The Nokia N1 tablet is sleek, well priced and a little familiar looking

Nokia announced the N1 Android tablet in late 2014 for launching in the Chinese market this year. Now, the Foxconn made, brand licensed tablet has made the trip to Mobile World Congress and we can finally see it for ourselves.



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Mortal Kombat X brings its Fatalities to Android devices in April

Developer NetherRealm Studios is bringing a version of its upcoming fighting game Mortal Kombat X to Android devices this April. The free-to-play game should be released around the same time as its previously announced PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC counterparts.



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Intel @ Mobile World Congress liveblog – 9 a.m. EST

We’re coming at you live from Intel’s booth in the booming Hall 3 at Fira Gran Via at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain. And … that’s really all that we know is about to happen at 3 p.m. CET — that’s 9 a.m. in New York City.

So let’s do this liveblog thing and see what sort of trouble we can get into.



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Watch us get Androidified at MWC 2015

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Androidifying yourself is nothing new. The app has existed for quite some time and Google continues to utilize the resulting Android caricatures in advertising and media. This year at MWC 2015 they are inviting all attendees to Androidify themselves, offering custom badges and tote bags to commemorate the experience. Naturally, it’s one of the first things we had to do upon setting foot inside the show gates.

It’s hard to miss the giant Android head that adorns Google’s outdoor booth. We went right inside and got to work on making our Android counterparts by way of several large touchscreens adorning the walls. You can see the end result in the below video.

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Sundar Pichai Confirms MVNO Ambitions and Android Pay, Was Wearing an Unreleased Device Earlier

Early this morning, Google’s Sundar Pichai sat down for a keynote address at Mobile World Congress to talk about a handful of new ideas that his company is working on. From Google Translate to Project Loon delivering LTE to Project Titan’s little planes taking over the skies, he touched on a bunch of interesting topics in an opening chat. He then transitioned into a Q&A session where he acknowledged the fact that Google is looking to enter the wireless game as an MVNO, and that Android Pay is a new API that is coming soon.

I can’t find a replay of the event, but The Verge has a transcription of the talk. 

When asked about Google being in talks to become an MVNO (sell wireless service on another carrier’s towers):

The core of Android is an ecosystem approach with partners, we’ve always tried to push the boundary of what’s next, we do that with hardware and software today (Nexus). For you to drive the next gen, you need to drive both, that’s why we do Nexus devices.

It’s a very small scale compared to the rest of the OEM industry, but it pushes the needle. I think we’re at the stage where we need to think of hardware, software, and connectivity together. Especially with things like watches. We don’t intend to be a carrier at scale, and we’re working with existing partners. You’ll see some of our ideas come to fruit in the next few months.

On if companies like Verizon and AT&T will have a problem with this:

We’ve talked with them about all this, we’re working with some partners to do what we’re doing. Carriers in the US are what powers most of our Android phones and that model works really well for us.

On if this means lowering prices:

We’re trying to show innovations, like calls automatically reconnecting if someone drops on one end. Those are the kinds of ideas we’re pursuing with this project.

We want to break down the barriers on how connectivity works.

From there, the chat moved onto Android Pay, which was rumored at the end of last week. The idea with Android Pay is to push mobile payments forward like never before. Pichai notes the obvious, that your phone is always with you, so why couldn’t you use it to do more, like pay for everything? Android Pay is a new API layer in Android and a “platform approach” that uses NFC and maybe even something else he wouldn’t mention. He did say that this won’t compete with Samsung Pay, though.

Finally, during the interview, Sundar was asked why he wasn’t wearing an Android Wear device. As it turns out, he was wearing an unreleased product and needed to remove it before coming on stage. Any guesses?

Via:  The Verge

Sundar Pichai Confirms MVNO Ambitions and Android Pay, Was Wearing an Unreleased Device Earlier is a post from: Droid Life

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A look at the new “Edge Screen” features on the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge [VIDEO]

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The original Galaxy Note Edge was Samsung’s first attempt at a curved edge display. It could be used as a ruler, or to display a stopwatch, flashlight, sports scores, app shortcuts, and more. The idea was cool, but the execution was not there yet. With the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge they’ve put the curved display on both sides and added some much nicer special features.

Instead of special apps for the edge display they’ve added shortcuts for your favorite contacts and cool color coded notifications. When you swipe in from the side you’ll see a vertical list of your favorite contacts, each with their own color. If you tap on a contact you’ll have the option to call them or send SMS.

When a notification arrives from one of these contacts you’ll see a subtle colored line on the edge of the display. Swipe on the line to pull out the notification and you’ll see a cool effect (pictured above). Here you can see the contents of the notification and take action to reply. The best feature comes when you set the Edge on its face. When a notification arrives the entire Edge screen will glow with the color of the contact.

You can also set up the Edge screen to show a “Information stream” of the time, weather, and certain notifications, and it can be used as a “Night clock.” Samsung has done a great job at turning what was originally seen as a gimmick into something people will actually use. Sometimes less is more. How do you like the Galaxy S6 Edge? Is it better than the Galaxy Note Edge?

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Lenovo Tries Its Hand At A Camera-Focused Smartphone With The Vibe Shot: 16MP, Laser Autofocus, OIS, Coming In June For $349

vibethumbThe photo-focused smartphone is becoming a definite niche, and at Mobile World Congress Lenovo is hoping to break in with a new model. The Vibe Shot (which sounds a lot like something you’d order at a questionable cocktail bar) is a Lollipop-equipped phone with a 16-megapixel rear camera and an 8MP front-facing shooter. Other photo-focused features include optical image stabilization, infrared autofocus, and a tri-color LED flash. Lenovo hopes to launch the Vibe Shot in June starting at $349.

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Lenovo Tries Its Hand At A Camera-Focused Smartphone With The Vibe Shot: 16MP, Laser Autofocus, OIS, Coming In June For $349 was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Hands-on with Samsung’s new Galaxy S6 Edge cases

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The Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge offers a unique new form factor, so it goes without saying we will see some interesting cases for the new flagship. Samsung will offer a few options out of the gate, including a new take on their S-View flip cover case as well as a lightweight plastic shell case.

The updated flip case features a translucent front providing a full-frontal view of the S6 display. Just as with previous Samsung flip covers, the phone can detect when the case is shut and displays a power-friendly clock and notification widget for at-a-glance updates. Lifting the cover will launch directly into your Galaxy S6 homescreen (provided you don’t have a screen lock enabled).

The case is curved to match the phone’s display and snaps snugly to the rear to offer 360 degrees of protection. We missed the presence of a magnetic clasp or other secure closure mechanism. The flip cover has a tendency to flap around freely otherwise.

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Samsung’s other case option for the S6 Edge is more or less the rear of the folio case without its flipping front — that is, a standard plastic shell case that snaps on over the rear of the device. The minimalist cases offer basic protection while showcasing the design of the device.

Samsung’s snap-on rear cases are transparent while the S6 Edge folio case is available in a selection of colors to match those of the Galaxy S6. All should be available at launch.

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Watch: Replay the Entire HTC One M9 Event

I think it’s safe to say that HTC didn’t have quite as good of a day yesterday as Samsung, but that doesn’t mean their new products aren’t worth familiarizing yourself with. After all, some of you probably won’t ever buy a Samsung device and instead prefer HTC’s metal and the silhouette of the One (M8), which is what the new One M9 looks like. Or maybe you are fascinated by their partnership with Under Armour or late entry into the VR world.

Whatever it is, you have a chance to relive the moments as they unfolded yesterday in Barcelona. The whole event was around 50 minutes, though, it felt much shorter and to-the-point than that. There isn’t a 60-second version, so you’ll need to either take an hour or do your best to jump to the good parts if you want to get through it in a hurry.

Related Coverage

Watch: Replay the Entire HTC One M9 Event is a post from: Droid Life

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Lenovo Announces An Affordable Duo Of LTE-Enabled Slates, The TAB 2 A10-70 And The A8

LenovoTAB2A10-70-ThumbLenovo has used this year’s Mobile World Congress as a chance to unveil two new affordable Android tablets that expand upon the immensely cheap TAB 2 A series introduced in January. These slates don’t aim for a lower price point ($99 is hard to beat, after all). Instead, both come with LTE.

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Left: TAB 2 A10-70, Right: TAB 2 A8

The TAB 2 A10-70 (not to be confused with the A7-10) has a 10 inch FHD screen, is only 8.9 millimeters thin, and weighs around 500 grams.

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Lenovo Announces An Affordable Duo Of LTE-Enabled Slates, The TAB 2 A10-70 And The A8 was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Watch: Replay the Entire Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge Event or the 60-Second Version

Yesterday, was a bit wild. Yesterday, was also a Sunday, so there is a good chance that you missed a bunch of it. If so, don’t worry! Both Samsung and HTC have hosted their MWC press events for replaying. We’ll start first with Samsung’s, because it was pretty impressive. From the Galaxy S6 to the S6 Edge, both of which have been completely redesigned from the ground up, we got the feeling after they exited the stage that Samsung was officially back in the driver’s seat. 

The full event is 45 minutes long, but Samsung also released a condensed 60-second version that will catch you up in a hurry. If you missed all of our coverage yesterday because you are a normal human being and didn’t attach yourself to a computer on a Sunday, now is your chance to get current.

You really don’t want to miss Samsung’s announcements.

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Related Coverage

Watch: Replay the Entire Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge Event or the 60-Second Version is a post from: Droid Life

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Intel @ Mobile World Congress liveblog – 9 a.m. EST

We’re coming at you live from Intel’s booth in the booming Hall 3 at Fira Gran Via at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain. And … that’s really all that we know is about to happen at 3 p.m. CET — that’s 9 a.m. in New York City.

So let’s do this liveblog thing and see what sort of trouble we can get into.



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Order and track Domino’s pizza deliveries on your Pebble and Android Wear

Domino’s today announced the company is providing customers with yet more ways to place, track and receive their orders. Should you own a Pebble or Android Wear-powered smartwatch, you’ll be able to use the provided Domino’s app to not only place an order, but track it too.



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Blackphone Introduces An Entreprise Privacy Platform With The Upgraded Blackphone 2 And A Blackphone+ Tablet

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Whether you subscribe to the whole debate on the lack of (and need for) privacy on a personal user level, there’s no denying that security is crucial in the enterprise. That’s the premise behind Silent Circle’s new Blackphone announcements today at MWC. The company, which recently purchased Geeksphone to gain complete control over its products, has unveiled its plans to foray into the enterprise with a complete suite of devices and services.

The Blackphone 2, which will be available in the second half of 2015, an upgraded version of the first generation, has switched to a larger 5.5″ 1080 display with a larger battery, faster octa-core processor, 3GB of RAM, and 32GB of storage.

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Blackphone Introduces An Entreprise Privacy Platform With The Upgraded Blackphone 2 And A Blackphone+ Tablet was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Samsung’s Galaxy S6 Unpacked Event Is Now Live On YouTube So You Can Relive Every Edge-Bending Moment

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If you were busy yesterday morning, or too hung over from Saturday night, you may have missed Samsung’s Unpacked presentation from Barcelona, Spain. Sure, you could read about the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge and their upcoming availability in the US, the revised Gear VR, and Samsung Pay… Or you could blow 40-some minutes watching the show in all its glossy grandeur. Did you really have anything better to do at work, today?

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Samsung’s Galaxy S6 Unpacked Event Is Now Live On YouTube So You Can Relive Every Edge-Bending Moment was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Qualcomm Reveals Its New Top-Of-The-Line Snapdragon 820 Processor At MWC, Shipping In The Second Half Of 2015

snappyQualcomm’s current top processor is the Snapdragon 810, which is only shipping in the LG G Flex 2 and set to appear in upcoming flagships like the HTC One M9. But at Mobile World Congress the Korean OEM is already taking the wraps off of its next-gen design, the predictably-named Snapdragon 820. Details on the exact capabilities of the new chip are scarce, but Qualcomm says it should be ready to ship to mobile manufacturers sometime in the second half of this year.

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Qualcomm Reveals Its New Top-Of-The-Line Snapdragon 820 Processor At MWC, Shipping In The Second Half Of 2015 was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Galaxy S6 vs iPhone 6: camera sample comparison

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We’ve already seen how the Samsung Galaxy S6 compares to the iPhone 6 in terms of its physical attributes, but we wanted to get an even better idea of how the two devices stacked up in terms of performance. Using what we had on hand, we put the camera of each phone to the test.

[In all subsequent test images, the Galaxy S6 appears first followed by the iPhone 6. Click to make each larger.]

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The immediate takeaway? There is definitely a difference in default white balance for the two. You can decide for yourself, but the iPhone 6 certainly has a more natural-looking color profile. The whites captured by the GS6 take on a off-white, almost yellow hue.

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The Galaxy S6 on the whole seems to produce images that are slightly darker than its iPhone counterpart, a quality that is very apparent given the shooting conditions we had (lots of bright lighting, a tony of shiny/reflective white surfaces). The impression is that the iPhone 6 camera is a bit more effortless than the Galaxy S6 when it comes to point-and-shoot photography. For the S6, getting the perfect shot will likely take a bit more fiddling around with settings and scene.

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One area where the S6’s camera excels is resolution. The phone’s 16MP shooter provides clarity beyond the iPhone’s sensor at close zoom levels. You can see a comparison in the two images above.

The final photographic results are important, but there are other things that go into making a smartphone camera unique or useful. As with previous releases, Samsung offer far more robust camera software than Apple, giving users a plethora of options. The scene settings and other tweaks add flexibility to the GS6 that isn’t really present with the iPhone 6 (though Apple has slowly been beefing up the software side of their camera in recent releases). The Galaxy S6 also promises super fast shooting with a camera app that Samsung claims can be launched in 0.7 seconds after double-tapping the phone’s home button.

A camera’s performance often comes down to how you use it, so mileage will always vary. While we think it’s pretty clear that Apple’s phone plays nicer with lighting and gives us photos with truer whites, it can’t match the clarity or versatility of the Galaxy S6.

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Cyanogen gets a new look, a new tone and a new business partner in Qualcomm

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It’s no secret Cyanogen could use a change of pace and scenery after the company’s public falling out with OnePlus One and the controversy that spawned of the Micromax deal in India. Cyanogen wants to turn the page from not only that, but from their core roots of security, customization and their open-source ideals.

The company wants to grow and evolve in a way that’s more inviting for, well, everyone. Their new logo, look and website — shots of which you can see above and below — supposedly embodies their new values, but to us it’s just a fresh (and pretty) coat of paint.

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What we really care about is their new found commitment to users, openness (not just in the open-source way) and a “democratic” approach to building an operating system, community and ecosystem. It’s a natural step forward for a company which publicly wants to “take Android away from Google.”

That’s not to say they want Google to simply hand over the rights to the operating system — that’s an insane notion — but they want to create a platform for manufacturers, developers and users to use Android on their products without having to worry about the hijinks that often come along with it.

We’re referring to Google Play Services and the need to adhere by Google’s strict licensing terms in order to get the “best” Android experience. It’s their belief (and ours, too) that the “best” Android experience shouldn’t have to be limited to those with enough resources and clout to gain access to Google’s apps and services. It’s that approach to building CyanogenMod that could help the company mature and reach new heights that we have yet to see from someone with their grassroots background.

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With all of this comes a new partnership with Qualcomm that will have the company’s ROM installed on Qualcomm’s Snapdragon reference design devices going forward. The partnership only covers reference designs from the Snapdragon 400 and Snapdragon 600 series to start, and there’s nothing that says the deal can’t expand to the top-line 800 series down the line.

In case you’re not aware, a reference device is a development device for manufacturers and developers to use for application and platform testing. They’re often tricked out with industry standard specs, but the cost of entry is typically higher than a similar device at retail and they don’t have the looks to be a viable everyday smartphone for most users.

They also don’t ship with a very exciting operating system, that being a barebones version of AOSP. This partnership will change that and give developers a platform just as exciting to use as the device they’re using it on.

We’re sure it’s Cyanogen’s hope that the partnership will inspire device manufacturers and developers to embrace CyanogenMod as not just a viable development environment, but also as a platform that they can potentially build their products with. Best of luck to them in achieving that goal.

[via Cyanogen]

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Sundar Pichai Essentially Confirms ‘Nova,’ Google’s First Foray Into Cellular Service

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Several weeks ago, rumors started floating around about a purported Google MVNO codenamed Nova. It looks like that’s a little more than a rumor now, as Android lead Sundar Pichai essentially spilled the beans at a talk today at Mobile World Congress. Now, before you get too excited, it looks like this is going to be on a much smaller scale than we originally thought, and is in fact not intended to go head-to-head with the Big Four.

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Sundar Pichai Essentially Confirms ‘Nova,’ Google’s First Foray Into Cellular Service was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Galaxy S6 Achieves Monstrously High Benchmark Scores, Leaves HTC One M9 In The Dust

GS6 thumbIt almost goes without saying, but benchmarks are not everything. These numbers don’t always tell you how a device will perform, but they do tell you something. Right now the Galaxy S6 is telling us that Samsung’s new Exynos chip is very, very fast. It’s putting up AnTuTu scores of nearly 70,000, well above the values produced by devices like the LG G3, Nexus 6, LG G Flex 2, and even the new HTC One M9.

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Galaxy S6 Achieves Monstrously High Benchmark Scores, Leaves HTC One M9 In The Dust was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Hands-on with the Samsung Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge [VIDEO]

AndroidForums.com Discussion: Galaxy S6, Galaxy S6 Edge

We finally got some personal time with the new Samsung Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge. These two devices are identical in almost every way. The Edge has one big difference, which of course is the curved display on the long edges. This time Samsung hasn’t used that area for a special display, but it can still do some cool stuff, and makes swiping from the edge a lot easier.

The big story with the S6 and Edge is the brand new design. Gone is the faux metal and plastic. Samsung has replaced those old materials with glass on the front and back and metal around the edges. Many people have accused the devices of taking cues from the iPhone, but you can’t say it’s not a huge improvement. They’ve also added built-in wireless charging for Qi and PMA, which is a super handy addition.

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As mentioned above, these devices are almost identical. They both have 2560 x 1440 Super AMOLED HD displays, 16MP cameras (5MP on front), Samsung Exynos processors, 3GB of RAM, and 2550 mAh batteries. You can check out the full spec sheet for the Galaxy S6 here and the Galaxy S6 Edge right here.

On the software side of things there have been some improvements to TouchWiz. Samsung was very proud about how they’ve cut down on features by “40%.” You know when someone brags about removing features there were some problems. The best new software feature might be the super fast camera. It’s always running in the background so it can be launched in less than a second with a double-tap of the home button.

The funny thing with this new generation of devices is the Edge might be the most attractive option. The previous Edge looked lopsided with a curved display on only one side. The S6 Edge might be the most ergonomic phone on the market. The curved display on both edges make it very comfortable to hold. The curves just add to the overall sleekness of Samsung’s new design. Check out our hands-on video to get a feel for this new device.

Which new Samsung Galaxy device do you like the most? Would you get the Edge over the standard S6 model?

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Samsung Pay now official, will debut on new Galaxy S 6, S 6 edge

Last year, we said that Samsung was looking at payment process through smartwatches. We first thought it would be partnering with PayPal but as it turned out, the South Korean giant went ahead to acquire LoopPay. The company was all set to rival Apple Pay and Google Wallet. And since the newest flagship phone was revealed by Samsung over the weekend, the tech giant is also introducing the official mobile payment system called Samsung Pay.

Samsung is bringing the newest payment solution which could set a new trend in e-commerce and mobile payments. Why, Samsung Pay may be new but it can work with traditional magstripe terminals. That means, you can use it with existing point-of-sale terminals. There’s less need to change the terminals in stores because the new Samsung Pay can still work on them, therefore, it will benefit more people. As well all know, electronic mobile payments and mobile wallets, no matter how great the features are, will always depend on the terminals.

Samsung wants to bring mobile payments technology to more people so it’s taking advantage of Near Field Communication (NFC) and Magnetic Secure Transmission (MST) technologies. The latter is a new tech but it makes mobile payment more accessible to both consumers and merchants.

Aiming to deliver the best solution in mobile payments, Samsung partnered with Visa and MasterCard, two of the major payment networks in the world today. The company is still in discussion with Citi, US Bank, JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, and American Express to expand the ecosystem and provide the solution to more customers all over the world.

Samsung Electronics’ CEO and Head of IT & Mobile Communications Division JK Shin takes pride in this new product. He said:

“Samsung Pay will reinvent how people pay for goods and services and transform how they use their smartphones. The secure and simple payment process, coupled with our robust partner network, makes Samsung Pay a truly game-changing service that will bring value to consumers and our partners in the ecosystem.”

This development makes mobile commerce more interesting agrees Visa’s Executive Vice President McCarthy. He said, “Combining Visa’s expertise in payment technology with Samsung’s leadership in creating innovative mobile experiences, gives more choice to financial institutions who want to enable their customers to pay by phone.” Meanwhile, Bank of America’s CEO, Chairman and Director Brian Moynihan thinks “Samsung Pay is another significant move in that direction for our 17 million mobile customers.”

MasterCard is also excited about this development in mobile payments. Chief Emerging Payments Officer Ed McLaughlin of Mastercard shared, “As consumers are increasingly relying on their mobile devices in their everyday lives, we are excited to work with an industry leader like Samsung to deliver new payment options to our cardholders around the world. We have been a pioneer of mobile commerce innovation for years and together we’re delivering a digital payment experience that is both simple and secure.”

Once everything is in order, Samsung Pay could have the the widest coverage of mobile payments. It could be accepted in about 30 million merchant terminals because of the Magnetic Secure Transmission (MST) that will allow Samsung Pay to work with current payment terminals in most countries. E-commerce and mobile payments have the potential to become bigger and widely accepted, thanks to Samsung’s Magnetic Secure Transmission (MST) technology. Samsung Pay will also support private label credit cards (PLCC) once companies like Synchrony Financial and First Data Corporation officially partner with Samsung.

Unlike other mobile payment systems already available, Samsung Pay offers a more universal mobile payment solution because of the technologies being used. This special feature will be debut later this 2015 on the new Samsung Galaxy S 6 and Galaxy S 6 edge.

SOURCE: Samsung, MasterCard, Visa

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Hands-on with Huawei’s first Android Wear smartwatch

For those who like traditional watches on their wrists but are looking for more functionalities from their accessory, the design of a lot of the smartwatches in the market leave a lot to be desired. Chinese OEM Huawei announced their first smartwatch, and it will try to convince that segment of the market to try out their take on the wearable, which looks like an elegant, “normal” watch but is in fact laden with features and functionalities more than just telling the time.

The Huawei Watch comes in standard silver and black and gold, looking like a beautiful timepiece. It has a sapphire crystal lens with a 1.4-inch roundfaced touchscreen. The display has a 400×400 pixel, 286 ppi resolution, which may not be that impressive, but is relatively better than some of the (very few) circular smartwatches in the market. The device’s cold-forged stainless steel is 40% harder and is scratch-resistant. There is also a physical button at the 2 o’clock position that is more natural for your grip than say, the Moto 360′s button. It really does look like more of a regular watch than the other wearables we’ve seen so far, which may appeal to those who don’t want to look like they’re wearing a smartwatch for some reason.

In terms of what’s inside, it has a built-in heart rate monitor and 6-Axis motion sensors to monitor your physical activities, including walking, running, biking, hiking, and even your sleeping habits. You can also record and keep track of how many calories you’ve burned, how many steps you’ve taken, how high you’ve climbed, and how far you’ve traveled, pretty standard fare for wearable devices nowadays.

The Huawei watch has a 512MB memory, 4GB of storage, and of course a Bluetooth 4.1 to connect it to your smartphone. It will also have a magnetic charging station, although they have not announced yet details about its battery life, pricing, and availability.

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VIA: SlashGear

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Intel Unveils A Trio Of New Mobile Chips: Atom x3, x5, and x7 – Coming To Phones, Tablets, And Other Stuff

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This week at MWC, Intel revealed its 2015 and 2016 mobile chipset lineup, as well as the fact that the company is adopting a similar naming scheme to its Core line of processors with these new chips. They’ve been dubbed x3, x5, and x7, and as with the Core processors, bigger is generally better.

Intel has long been something of a dark horse in the mobile industry. The company has seen negligible penetration in smartphones to date (though not none) and competes almost exclusively in the low to mid-range segment in Android tablets.

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Intel Unveils A Trio Of New Mobile Chips: Atom x3, x5, and x7 – Coming To Phones, Tablets, And Other Stuff was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Huawei debuts ‘slimmest’ 7-inch phablet at MWC

China-based manufacturer Huawei continues its drive to become one of the world’s leading brands in Android smartphones and tablets with the release of this new 7-inch phablet, the MediaPad X2. This is among the products Huawei is presenting to the public in the ongoing Mobile World Congress 2015 in Barcelona. Let’s see what the new phablet has to offer.

At its size, users will normally begin to wonder if 7 inches is a legitimate size for a handheld device that still incorporates phone functionality. Be that as it may, Huawei claims that the MediaPad X2 is designed for “easy one-handed use” – we wonder how that is. Huawei also claims that this is the thinnest 7-inch phablet around at 7.28mm. The phablet device provides an 80% screen-to-body ratio, giving users much needed screen real estate.

Under the hood, we find a 2.0GHz Kirin 930 chipset with a 64-bit octa-core CPU and a Mali-T628 graphics chip. The phablet comes in two versions: one backstopped with 2GB RAM and 16GB internal storage and is encased in a silver aluminum back plate, and a gold version with 3GB RAM and 32GB of internal storage. The 7-inch screen is a full HD (1080p) IPS display, and the phablet comes with a robust 5,000mAh battery for 2-day operations on a single charge.

The phablet will be running Android Lollipop out of the box, and will have LTE connectivity and dual SIM options. Pricing and availability have not been announced at this point. Continue to monitor all the goings-on at the MWC via our MWC 2015 tag.

VIA: SlashGear

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Google is launching their own payments framework: Android Pay

Android Pay is real, and it’s going to power mobile payments across Android. But it’s not so much an app or even user-facing feature, as a service that developers will be able to leverage as an API framework to build payments into their own apps.



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Google’s Sundar Pichai confirms MVNO is happening

We’re liveblogging Google’s Sundar Pichai from his Q&A at Mobile World Congress, and he’s just confirmed that Google is working on some sort of limited wireless operating status.



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Intel’s new Atom chips cover cheap phones to premium tablets

Intel’s been slow to transform itself for the new mobile world, but with its latest family of Atom chips it may finally be able to go toe-to-toe with Qualcomm. The chip giant announced the Atom X3, X5 and X7 processors at Mobile World Congress today, giving it an arsenal that can fit into both budget and high-end devices (and everything in between). Specifically, Intel’s targeting the new X3 chip at devices under $75, while the X5 and X7 are aimed at gadgets $150 or more. The X3 also marks the first time Intel’s been able to integrate a modem into a system-on-a-chip (it’s available in both 3G and LTE variants).

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The Big Picture: HTC’s Vive VR headset up close and personal

This is what HTC’s Vive VR headset looks like in real life. It’s not a dummy model, those sensors are fully functional. It’s on my actual head. The first thing you may notice (if you don’t, check the gallery below), is that it looks a little bigger than the Oculus Rift. Or at least, thanks to the height of the sensor-housing faceplate, it feels that way. Those sensors are also exposed, a bit like they were on Oculus’ Crystal Cove prototype at CES 2014. Take a look around the headset from different angles, and you’ll see that HTC may not have deviated from the current virtual reality design script too far, but at the same time it doesn’t feel entirely derivative. Can this thing blow our minds like we hope it will? Is the VR race now officially on (given, you know who’s newest headset has just debuted too)? We’ll let you know once HTC finally pours its Valve-powered VR into our eyes later this week. %Gallery-slideshow269256%

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Hands-on with the new HTC One M9 [VIDEO]

Talk about the HTC One M9 at AndroidForums.com!

Yesterday the HTC One M9 was officially announced at Mobile World Congress. We were in attendance at the event, and we had a chance to check out the device in person. The One M9 looks a lot like the One M8. In fact, it’s pretty much identical. From the front they look the same, but the back and insides are what set the M9 apart.

Specs are a very important part of any phone, but even more so for the One M9. Since HTC didn’t change the outer design they have put all the focus on the specs and software. The M9 has a 5-inch 1080p display, 20.7MP camera (2 “UltraPixel” front), Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 processor, and 2840mAh battery. Check out the full HTC One M9 specs here.

HTC One M9 DSC08389

On the software side you’re getting Android 5.0.2 and Sense 7. Like the design of the M9, there aren’t many visual changes in Sense 7, but the functionality has big changes. The biggest change is a new “Sense Home” widget that you’ll find on the home screen by default. HTC tries to predict what apps you’ll need for certain situations and put them in this widget.

If your phone detects that you’re at work it can fill up the widget with productivity apps, and when you’re home it will display entertainment apps. At least that’s the general idea. If you don’t want HTC to try to figure all of this out for you it can be set up manually. There are also “Smart Folders” that automatically organize things for you.

Another cool new software feature is custom navigation buttons. By default you have back, home, and recent, but you can add a virtual power button, notification shade shortcut, fullscreen button, and quick settings, and more. It’s a really cool idea that we’d love to see more manufacturers embrace.

The One M9 lacks the excitement of previous HTC phones, but this is still an excellent device. The M9 will be one of the top devices of 2015. Do you think HTC did enough to improve from the M8? Will you be buying the HTC One M9? Let us know what you think about this device!

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