Posts Tagged benchmark tests

Gamebench claims to be “uncheatable” benchmarking tool

Benchmarking has become unreliable. What started as Samsung cheating on benchmark tests quickly morphed into just about everyone spiking their results, making us wonder if we were in the Android steroid era. While benchmarks are meant to provide a barometer of what can be expected from your device, they simply can’t be trusted.

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Like the steroid era in Baseball, new testing methods are making their way to us. One such test is Gamebench, which promises their test is “uncheatable”. Rather than go for the one-time approach in which the app runs and attempts to exploit the device, Gamebench runs alongside the games you play, watching your real-world use. This is meant give an actual idea of how the device works in a day-to-day scenario.

Engadget ran Gamebench through its paces, testing it on an HTC One and Samsung Galaxy S4 using four games: Real Racing 3, Minion Rush, Dead Trigger, and Deer Hunter 2014. The results? The S4 won, but that’s not the story here. The real win has to do with the testing itself, which gives a better idea of what a device is actually capable of.

It also shows battery drain, which is a major concern for Android gaming fans. In the testing, the S4 did really well with frames-per-second, but accomplished that feat with increased battery drain. We should expect to see the app hit sometime early next year, and we’ll be sure to test it out with some legacy devices and compare tests when we get our hands on it.

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Google Nexus 5 with Android 4.4 KitKat spotted in benchmark tests

At this point we’re pretty confident in saying the new Nexus 5 will be made by LG, and is coming soon. Between the leak yesterday of the Nexus 5 being found at a bar, Google’s own video showing off the phone, and more. Well, today we can add one more sighting complete with additional details found from a GFXBench result.

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We know most of the important details at this point about the upcoming Nexus smartphone, which here is being called the Google Nexus 5. Not the LG Nexus 5. Showing the brand being Google, and the name being Nexus 5. This leaked benchmark result, if accurate, also shows the device running Android 4.4 KitKat.

Confirming what we already knew this is teasing the quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 processor at 2.26 GHz, 2GB of RAM, and a 1080p full HD display. It’s showing 1794 x 1080 because the use of on-screen navigation keys of course. Then we’re still seeing “Key Lime Pie” instead of KitKat, with the Android version build being KRS71D. Which of course the K is for KitKat (or KeyLimePie) just like all current builds start with a J for Belly Bean.

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While this could be fake we’ve seen similar results turn up accurate from GFXBench before, not to mention this mirrors countless other leaks and rumored specs. At this point all we really need to know is what carriers will get it, if Google can get all (read: Verizon) on board, and when it will be released. Latest tips suggest an October 14th reveal and end of October release date.

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Smartphones with the fastest benchmark tests

Which are the smartphones with the fastest benchmark tests?

We came up with a list of twenty of the fastest smartphones, based on Geekbench benchmark tests.

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Benchmark tests

Benchmark tests are useful for determining the speed of smartphones. They are particularly important in comparing how one device is better or worse than another in terms of specific categories like CPU, graphics, or memory performance. If you are in the market for a new smartphone, these tests can aid in your decision, especially if performance is your top priority.

Methodology

Geekbench is a benchmark test app that measures the performance of the CPU and memory of various devices across different platforms. On its official website, it shows the results from tests performed by actual users and shows the average scores. Geekbench results are based on a scale whose baseline is a score of 1,000, the score of a single-processor Power Mac G5 running at the speed of 1.6GHz. On such scale, higher scores are deemed better. The chart is updated every two hours, so consumers are ensured that the results are always up-to-date.

Apart from Geekbench, various benchmark tests are available, including Androbench, AnTuTu, CFBench, GLBench, Google Octane, Google V8, Quadrant Standard, SunSpider, and Vellamo. Some of these tests are not compatible with the different operating systems. For instance, AnTuTu, NenaMark, Quadrant Standard and Vellamo are not suitable for testing iOS devices. Meanwhile, others like Androbench or Google Octane, only focus on particular elements, such as storage or JavaScript performance.

Results

According to Geekbench results, the Samsung Galaxy S4, particularly the model with the the quad-core Exynos 5 Octa 5410 1600 MHz processor, has the highest score. Said model of the Galaxy S4 scored an average of 3510, which is 300 points higher than the LTE version with the quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 1900 MHz processor. Following the Samsung flagship is the HTC One, then two LG smartphones: the LG Nexus 4 and the LG Optimus G. The list continues with the Sony Xperia Z, the Xiaomi MI-2, two models of the Samsung Galaxy Note II, and the HTC Droid DNA in tenth place. In the lower half of the list, we find the first non-Android device, the Blackberry Z10, followed by several Android smartphones again: the HTC Butterfly and three models of the Samsung Galaxy S II. In sixteenth place is the dual-core Apple iPhone 5 with the Apple A6 1300 MHz processor, another Samsung Galaxy S III model, and the CDMA+GSM version of the Apple iPhone 5. Finally, at the bottom of the top twenty list are the Sony Xperia T and the HTC One X+.

The list of the smartphones with the fastest benchmark tests is dominated by Android smartphones. Only three devices in the list are from other platforms, specifically Blackberry and iOS. There was no information on Windows Phone devices in the Geekbench results, which explains why no Windows-based devices appear on the list.

Sony Xperia ZU, Pantech IM-A880

Also missing from the list are the Sony Xperia ZU and the Pantech IM-A880, two devices that recently underwent AnTuTu benchmark tests. These two devices have both scored higher on such test compared to the the Samsung Galaxy S4 with the Exynos 5 Octa processor. However, no Geekbench test results are available for such devices as of the moment.

Sources: primatelabs 1, 2, mostly-tech

The post Smartphones with the fastest benchmark tests appeared first on The Droid Guy.

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Mysterious LG device with Snapdragon 800 spotted in benchmark tests, most likely G2 not Nexus 5

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Another LG device was spotted in AnTuTu Benchmarks, and the speculation is that it could be the Nexus 5. It has a model number of LG-F320 and scored 32,000 points with its 2.3GHz Snapdragon 800 CPU. I know a lot of people are hoping for a Nexus 5, but this is probably a G2 variant for Korea.

Remember, LG confirmed they aren’t working on a Nexus 5. Of course, shortly after, it was reported that they produced a prototype, but there are a lot of prototypes that never hit the market. I am still on record as saying there won’t be a Nexus phone this year, and instead, it’s going to be just Google Edition and Motorola phones from here on.

Going back to the G2, we should get a lot of info on the device at LG’s event on August 7.

source: GSMInsider

Come comment on this article: Mysterious LG device with Snapdragon 800 spotted in benchmark tests, most likely G2 not Nexus 5

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Mysterious LG device with Snapdragon 800 spotted in benchmark tests, most likely G2 not Nexus 5

LG_F320_AnTuTu_Benchmark

Another LG device was spotted in AnTuTu Benchmarks, and the speculation is that it could be the Nexus 5. It has a model number of LG-F320 and scored 32,000 points with its 2.3GHz Snapdragon 800 CPU. I know a lot of people are hoping for a Nexus 5, but this is probably a G2 variant for Korea.

Remember, LG confirmed they aren’t working on a Nexus 5. Of course, shortly after, it was reported that they produced a prototype, but there are a lot of prototypes that never hit the market. I am still on record as saying there won’t be a Nexus phone this year, and instead, it’s going to be just Google Edition and Motorola phones from here on.

Going back to the G2, we should get a lot of info on the device at LG’s event on August 7.

source: GSMInsider

Come comment on this article: Mysterious LG device with Snapdragon 800 spotted in benchmark tests, most likely G2 not Nexus 5

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Samsung SCH-i425 Godiva outed in benchmark tests, headed for Verizon

DNP Samsung SCHi425 Godiva outed in benchmark testing, likely headed for Verizon

Like Lady Godiva herself, a phone dubbed the Samsung Godiva has been seen naked – at least as far as benchmarks are concerned. The site GLBenchmark has revealed it has a 1.4GHz MSM8960 Snapdragon S4 SoC on board, along with Adreno 305 graphics, a 720p screen, Android 4.1.2 Jelly Bean and support for Verizon’s LTE network. Its SCH-i425 model number points to the possibility that it might be the successor to the Stratosphere II (which was known as the SCH-i415) and could therefore sport a sliding keyboard, but that remains firmly speculative at the moment. Yet, seeing as how Samsung’s mobile offerings at CES 2013 were practically non-existent, we’re betting the Godiva — unlike the Lady of Coventry’s ride in the nude — is more fact than fiction.

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Via: Phone Arena

Source: GLBenchmark

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Nexus 10 and iPad 4 Go Head to Head in Benchmark Brawl

It is time for a NO HOLDS BAR fight to the death, match-up between the iPad 4 and the supposed iPad killer, the Nexus 10. Yeah we have heard that name many times. Everyone seems to call any new awesome tablet the iPad killer, and when the Nexus 10 started showing its pretty face around the web, it was certain that it was going to be a killer as well. Then the benchmark tests started. Seems that the Nexus 10 might have brought a knife to a gun fight.

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The gallery below shows 6 different benchmark tests that not only show the iPad and Nexus 10, but smartphones and other tablets. The main focus, though, is the comparison of the two tablet giants. Sadly it seems that the iPad out-performs the Nexus 10 in nearly every category. Something you do not really want to hear, but then again, who really cares, right? It is really all about preference, and even though certain tests show that the Nexus 10 does not perform as well as the iPad, it is still a very sexy, high-powered tablet. I do not think this would sway any of you not to get a Nexus 10 if you were thinking about purchasing one. I know it has not changed my mind one bit, and I am still hoping Santa Claus drops one down the chimney, my house does not have. Let us know what you guys think.

 

Source: Android Guys

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Sony LT25 “Tsubasa” handset destined for several international markets

Sony is continuing work on their LT25 handset codenamed “Tsubasa” with signs pointing toward several versions being available. Indications are the Sony LT25 will be a global phone. Already a version with the model number LT25c has shown up in benchmark tests indicating it is destined for China Telecom. Other model numbers include an LT25h which will be used in international HSPA+ markets and the LT25i which will be used in international LTE markets.

If model numbers are any indication, the LT25 “Tsubasa” will be a step down from the Experia S which carries the LT26i model number. Various benchmark tests indicate the Tsubasa will have a dual-core S4 Snapdragon running at 1.5GHz mated to an Adreno 225 GPU. The screen will be running at 1280 x 720 although the size is not yet known.

source: Xperia Blog


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Qualcomm S4 Pro quad-core developer tablet benchmarks and hands-on

Earlier today we gave you a bit of information on Qualcomm‘s new Snapdragon S4 Pro developer tablet, but now we’re back with more info thanks to a number of benchmark tests SlashGear has performed. As expected, the Snapdragon S4 Pro delivered some really impressive results in the tests, thanks to its quad-core APQ8064 chipset, 2GB of RAM, and Adreno 320 GPU. Since this tablet is intended for developers, you may not be surprised to hear that it performed well in benchmark tests, but we have a feeling that you’ll be left at least a little impressed nonetheless.


First up is the test with Quadrant. Here, the Snapdragon S4 Pro posted some staggering results, with its numbers coming dangerously close to 8,000. Since we’re used to seeing the most powerful devices end up closer to 5,000, that gives us some pretty high hopes for the S4 Pro. Indeed, run-of-the-mill tasks like browsing, scrolling, and navigating the Google Play Store were incredibly smooth despite the fact that the S4 Pro ships with Ice Cream Sandwich instead of Jelly Bean, but then, the S4 Pro wasn’t made for such mundane tasks, was it? Check out the results for the Quadrant test above.

The S4 Pro posted similarly impressive results for the AnTuTu test, getting a result of 13,975. That puts it ahead of the Samsung Galaxy S III by a fair amount, with the S4 Pro enjoying wider margins on the ASUS Transformer Prime and the Samsung Galaxy Note. The Samsung Galaxy S III is widely considered to be one of the most powerful Android devices around, so the fact that the S4 Pro came out ahead of it in the AnTuTu test speaks volumes about what’s going on under the hood.

Finally, we come to the test with Vellamo, Qualcomm’s own in-house benchmarking suite. Vellamo mainly tests web browsing, and though the S4 Pro didn’t post the ridiculous margins we saw in the Quadrant and AnTuTu tests, it still came out on top.

So, the Snapdragon S4 Pro can deliver some jaw-dropping results when it comes to benchmarks, but the truth is that this tablet isn’t meant for the average consumer. The $1299 price point certainly reflects that, but it’s safe to say that if you have cash to burn and want a tablet that isn’t going to become irrelevant anytime soon, you might want to give the S4 Pro a look. The Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro is available now, and we’re expecting to see its quad-core processor show up in other Android devices later this year. Have a look at our full gallery of image below, which includes images from all of the tests discussed above (and additional tests), as well as a few of the tablet itself and the docking bay that comes with it!

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Archos Readies ICS Gaming Console

A gaming console from Archos called the Ludo G10 has been seen in GL Benchmark tests recently by the folks at NotebookItalia. This gaming console is actually a tablet based on Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich that Archos will reportedly not package as a competitor against high-end devices with its specifications. Rather, the French company will possibly sell the device as one of the first gaming consoles based on Android OS in the market. Of course, by marketing it as such, Archos faces competition from the OUYA console, a device in the works that is expected to have an NVIDIA Tegra 3 processor, 8GB of internal storage, 1GB of RAM, Bluetooth, WiFi, and Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. The OUYA is aiming for a $95 to $99 price tag and could be released around March next year.

By comparison, the benchmark tests reveal that the Archos Ludo G10 console sports a high resolution display with 1920 x 1008 pixels, though the latter number is likely a typographical error and the resolution instead should be 1920 x 1080 pixels, which is more common. Its processor is the dual-core Texas Instruments 4470 chipset which has a clock speed of 1.8GHz. To date, this processor has not been released and will possibly be available sometime during the fourth quarter of this year. Meanwhile, the graphics processing unit of the gaming console could be the PowerVR SGX554 which should give excellent graphics on the high resolution screen.

If Archos does push through with this list of specifications, it should amount to a pretty decent package, especially if this device is paired with the budget-friendly prices for which Archos is known, which is a very likely possibility.

None of these have been confirmed, so as always, the rumor should be taken with a grain of salt. One change that Archos could make on the list is replacing Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich with Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, the newest version of the popular Linux-based OS.

Via androidauthority

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Benchmark Tests Reveal Quad-core CPU and 720p Display on Galaxy Note II

Recent benchmark tests have revealed that the upcoming Samsung Galaxy Note II will have a quad-core processor as well as a display with 720 pixels.

The benchmark tests did not exactly refer to the Samsung Galaxy Note II, but to the Samsung GT-N7100. Presumably, these two names refer to one and the same device, since the original Samsung Galaxy Note was called the Samsung GT-N7000.

Rumors of the forthcoming device had been circulating for some time, including one that points to a larger display and a smaller bezel which will allow the device to have a more compact form.

Going back to the benchmark tests, the Samsung Galaxy Note II is believed to have the Exynos 4412 CPU as its processor coupled with Mali 400 graphics. This is contrary to earlier rumors that surmised that the Note II would have a Cortex A15 processor. Those familiar with the innards of the Samsung Galaxy S III would recognize the CPU and GPU tandem as the same duo found on the S III. Samsung’s choice to stick with the same formula could mean that the Cortex A15 is for future iterations of the phablet or even on its tablets.

Despite having the same processor, the Samsung Galaxy Note II has a higher score compared to the S III in the Offscreen test. This possibly means that Samsung has done some overclocking on the device. Last year, the Korean company did the same with the first Galaxy Note and the Galaxy S II. The processor of the new Note has a maximum clock speed of 1.6GHz while the one on the S III has a frequency of 1.4GHz.

Meanwhile, the pixel display resolution of the Note II is said to be 1280 x 720 pixels whereas its OS is Android 4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich.

The device is expected to be announced at the IFA event in Berlin on August 30. Sales could start in September to pre-empt the launch of the new iPhone.

Via slashgear

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Pegatron E-Tab 4G Pops Up in Online Benchmark


The results of a benchmark test of a new Android tablet from Pegatron have just been divulged online. What is surprising, however, is that the device called the Pegatron E-Tab 4G, has never been announced. A Taiwanese firm, Pegatron manufactures devices and electronic parts such as tablets, notebooks, LCD TVs, game consoles for other companies such as Asustek. It is similar to Foxconn and Wistron.

According to the benchmarks test from two separate websites, Nenamark and GLBenchmark, the Pegatron E-Tab 4G carries a 1.4 GHz quad-core NVIDIA Tegra 3 processor and Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich OS. Its display has a resolution of 1280 x 752 in the benchmark test, but is possibly 1280 x 800 pixels in the actual screen. As the tablet’s name carries the word 4G, it may be assumed that it also offers LTE connectivity.

Benchmark tests assess the performance of a device by running several tests on it. The tests give scores or ratings that quantify the speed and efficiency of a device. The Pegatron E-Tab 4G fared quite well in the Nenamark benchmark test, with its minimum, average, and maximum being all 48.10. The GLBenchmark test also shows good results. Of course, these are not surprising granted that the Pegatron E-Tab 4G has a quad-core Tegra 3 chip under the hood.

The benchmark tests only reveal this much about the mysterious device, and the company itself is silent on the matter. Besides, it is still unknown whether this device will even make it to the market. If it does, it is very likely that it will end up under a different brand name.

This is not the first time that a device showed up in online benchmarking tests before it is unveiled to the public. The same thing happened to the Lenovo IdeaTab/LePad K2, and the Acer Iconia Tab A700, whose benchmark tests and some specifications were leaked months before their official launch.

 

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[Head-To-Head] HTC One XL (Qualcomm S4) Vs. HTC One X (NVIDIA Tegra 3) Reloaded

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Last week, we posted a benchmark battle between the HTC One XL (AT&T, Qualcomm Snapdragon S4) and the One X (Unlocked, Tegra 3). The reaction to the video was exactly as expected: the S4 enthusiasts defended the XL, while the Tegra 3 fans laughed and patted their favorite processor on the back.

Given how much buzz these two phones are generating right now (especially in comparison with each other), it’s definitely fun to watch them go head-to-head against in the benchmark arena, but the last video focused specifically on one test, and one test only (AnTuTu).

Are you interested in seeing how these two powerhouse phones compare to each other in several other benchmark tests?

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[Head-To-Head] HTC One XL (Qualcomm S4) Vs. HTC One X (NVIDIA Tegra 3) Reloaded was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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LG Optimus 3D Max wages dual-core war in benchmark tests

LG Optimus 3D Max wages a dual-core war in benchmark tests

A mere day has passed since we stumbled upon initial benchmarks for the Optimus 4X HD, and now, yet another LG smartphone has tossed its hat into the arena. In the Optimus 3D Max’s arsenal is a dual-core 1.2GHz CPU, which is part of the TI OMAP 4430 SoC. Today, we pitted it against two dual-core contemporaries from HTC and Samsung — namely, the One S and Galaxy S Blaze 4G. Sadly, the Optimus 3D Max failed to put up much of a resistance to either smartphone, and while its scores remain unofficial, its plainly obvious that this LG will look sorely dated upon its arrival. You can see how it all unfolded just after the break.

[Thanks, Konstantinos]

Continue reading LG Optimus 3D Max wages dual-core war in benchmark tests

LG Optimus 3D Max wages dual-core war in benchmark tests originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 12 Apr 2012 00:46:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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LG Optimus 4X HD faces up to HTC One X in benchmark tests

As sure as night follows day, benchmark bickering follows the release of a new Android device. I guess we never really outgrow the childhood “My Dad’s bigger than your Dad” complex. Only a couple of days ago we showed you how HTC’s One S performed and now it’s big brothers turn as the One X goes head-to-head with LG’s Optimus 4X HD in a battle of the quad-core titans.

Techblog got its hands on both devices and put them through popular benchmarking tools Quadrant, AnTuTu and NenaMark2. Not surprisingly the results were relatively similar with each phone performing stronger in certain areas. Quadrant saw the LG score a very respectable 4,512 with the HTC posting a market leading 4,909. LG came out the narrow winner in the AnTuTu test posting a 11,147 over HTC’s 11,030.  Finally the HTC managed 47.6 fps ahead of the LG which managed 44.5 fps in the NenaMark test.

So whilst all the publicity and hype is firmly set around the HTC device it’s encouraging to see that LG’s flagship phone more than holds its own against the best in the market. The true test as always will come down to which one performs every tasks better, no doubt a story for another day. Will you be considering the Optimus 4X HD as an alternative to the LG One X? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

source : Techblog

via : engadget


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LG Optimus 4X HD faces up to HTC One X in benchmark tests

As sure as night follows day, benchmark bickering follows the release of a new Android device. I guess we never really outgrow the childhood “My Dad’s bigger than your Dad” complex. Only a couple of days ago we showed you how HTC’s One S performed and now it’s big brothers turn as the One X goes head-to-head with LG’s Optimus 4X HD in a battle of the quad-core titans.

Techblog got its hands on both devices and put them through popular benchmarking tools Quadrant, AnTuTu and NenaMark2. Not surprisingly the results were relatively similar with each phone performing stronger in certain areas. Quadrant saw the LG score a very respectable 4,512 with the HTC posting a market leading 4,909. LG came out the narrow winner in the AnTuTu test posting a 11,147 over HTC’s 11,030.  Finally the HTC managed 47.6 fps ahead of the LG which managed 44.5 fps in the NenaMark test.

So whilst all the publicity and hype is firmly set around the HTC device it’s encouraging to see that LG’s flagship phone more than holds its own against the best in the market. The true test as always will come down to which one performs every tasks better, no doubt a story for another day. Will you be considering the Optimus 4X HD as an alternative to the LG One X? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

source : Techblog

via : engadget


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Huawei’s New Quad-core Processor Blows the Competition Out of the Water in Benchmarks

Huawei announced their new Ascend D Quad XL with a quad-core chip that they designed themselves. No Tegra 3 or Qualcomm in this bad boy, and the benchmarks are very impressive. They certainly backed up their claim that this processor is indeed the “world’s fastest” with a few benchmark tests. Check out the some of them below.

As you can see with both tests, it destroys any other processor out there. Exynos and Tegra 3 do not quite measure up, but Exynos is not to far behind. Apple’s A5x processor is suppose to be 4x more powerful than Tegra 3, but shockingly that has yet to be proven. Don’t you just love Apple? The Ascend D Quad XL will be rocking some Ice Cream Sandwich, and with this quad-core chip they have built for it, it is sure to be the new bad boy on the block.

Source: Android Community

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Intel’s Medfield Fairs Well in Benchmark Tests

Intel has recently been talking a lot about its Medfield platform, the Atom Z2460 processor, and the Orange “Santa Clara”, a European phone that will feature the Intel chipset. Cascheys Blog has run some benchmark tests on the Santa Clara, and while the processor is only single-core, it bested several other devices.

One benchmark test that was run, the “Vellamo”, was created by Qualcomm and will test eleven areas to gauge a mobile browser’s performance. The results from each area are combined into one score, which can be compared between devices. As you can tell from the photo above, the Santa Clara beat lots of other devices, including the Samsung Galaxy Nexus. Its Javascript score was one of the strongest in the group, matched only by the ASUS Transformer Prime.

The other benchmark test that was used was the Rightware test. This benchmark test looks at phone’s ability to render Javascript and HTML. This time, the Santa Clara beat out the iPhone 4S.

I’m sure that Intel would readily agree with these results, as they’ve been talking nonstop about the greatness and improved power consumption of Medfield-powered devices. We do have to remember, though, that benchmarks aren’t everything, and ultimately the overall user experience is the most important thing.

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source: Caschys Blog
via: Android Central

 

 


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Snapdragon S4 MSM8960 benchmarks show dual-core is not dead

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There is no denying that quad-core processors are the next big thing in mobile, but new benchmark tests suggest we shouldn’t be sleeping on the next generation of dual-core CPUs. AnandTech got their hands on a developer device sporting Qualcomm’s upcoming Snapdragon S4 MSM8960 platform and the results simply blew away the competition. I the Linpack multi-threaded benchmark the MSM8960 torched every device on the market. Its next closest competitor was the Samsung Galaxy S II, which didn’t even match half of the new S4′s score. Closer was last year’s Snapdragon S3 developer device, but barely.

The MSM8960′s GLBenchmark GPU scores weren’t as impressive as the pure processing scores, but it’s Adreno 225 still managed to lead the pack. The score is expected, as the 225 offers only incremental improvements to its predecessor, the Adreno 220. The Adreno 300 series is where the real GPU power is expected.

Perhaps even better than the MSM8960′s impressive benchmark scores is the fact that it is manufactured on a 28nm process, which not only equals a more compact chip but also improved battery life over previous dual-core platforms. In short: dual-core is far from dead. One device said to utilize the new chip is the upcoming HTC Ville, which should make its debut at Mobile World Congress. It won’t be as impressive as the HTC Endeavor’s quad-core design on paper, but we are willing to bet it will hold its own when it comes to pitting power against power.

[via Anandtech]


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Quad-core LG X3 flexes its muscles in benchmark test, new details leak

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If you want to see the power of four cores working in tandem, look no further than the above benchmark results. What you see are the results for the mobile- World Congress-bound LG X3, a Tegra 3 device that is also said to feature a 4.7-inch 720p display. Even if you are of the school of thought that benchmark tests of this nature don’t accurately tell us much about any handset, the results at least give us an idea of how much power we can expect compared to a device like the Samsung Galaxy Nexus.

The X3′s Tegra 3 chip will be clocked to 1.5GHz (1.4GHz during multi-core use) and the phone will likely launch with Ice Cream Sandwich. Other rumored specs include an 8MP rear camera with 1.3MP front-facing camera, NFC support, and a 2,000mAh battery.

[via MoDaCo]


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Galaxy Nexus Franco kernel shows us the need for speed, and great battery life

Recently here at Android Community we’ve been enjoying many different kernels for the Galaxy Nexus and have even featured a few here in the recent past. While many are great and work well today we have what appears to be one of the absolute best at the moment. That is the Franco kernel. More details and impressions after the break.

Now since I love a few different kernel builders like Morfic I’ve decided to add in a few screenshots of the Galaxy Nexus running stock, Morfic’s Trinity kernel, and the latest Franco build for a good comparison. We have a few Quadrant benchmark tests below for those interested although benchmarks aren’t everything. Daily usage performance needs to also be better, and that is exactly what we have with Franco’s latest update that dropped today.

If you’ve been looking for a kernel that will make your Galaxy Nexus scream with performance while giving you exceptional battery life then look no further than Franco. It really is the best we’ve tried thus far and was actually quite impressive. From loading up the browser, launching the gallery and even benchmarks — performance was boosted across the board. We’ll have to update on battery life but so far things are looking good.

Running the Galaxy Nexus completely stock on Verizon with Android 4.0.2 Ice Cream Sandwich we get roughly 1600 in Quadrant — quite low for a 1.2 GHz dual-core device although daily usage suggests otherwise as it performs great. With a good CM9 build and Franco’s latest kernel build #15 with tons of updates and improvements this boosts way up to 2600 and I/O results were increased 5 fold. It’s safe to say that while stock this device is great, but with the addition of this latest kernel build from Franco it simply flies.

Obviously there are a lot of different variables here with settings, overclocking, the ROM you are running and more but all of these tests were on the stock settings right after flashing. Trinity performs great and we’ve been running it for a few days now but the benchmark tests were extremely low. Looking through the changelog and extremely close attention to detail from Franco we can safely say his kernel is as good as it gets — for now.

Check out the screenshots below to see the results from stock, Trinity, and then Franco and see for yourself just how impressive it really is. If you’re the kernel flashing type, running Android 4.0.3 and would like to give it a try check out the XDA Thread here for all the details, changes, and download links.

franco-about
franco-main
gnex-franco
gnex-stock
gnex-trinity
franco-numbers

Device Specifications and Information
Device Info

    Device Name : GALAXY Nexus 4G [Verizon]
    Manufactuer : Samsung
    Carrier : Verizon
    Announced Date : December 14, 2011
    Release Date : December 15, 2011
    Also Known As : Nexus Prime

Display

  • Screen Size : 4.65 Inch
  • Resolution : 1280×720
  • Screen Type : Super AMOLED
Dimension & Weight

  • Height : 5.33 Inch
  • Width : 2.67 Inch
  • Depth : 0.37 Inch
  • Weight : 150 Grams
Battery & Power
    Battery Type:
  • Lithium Ion
  • Battery Capacity : 1850 mAh
  • Talk Time : NA
  • Stand By Time : 150 hours
Software
    Android OS:
  • 4.0.x
    Audio Playback:
  • AAC
  • AAC+
  • AMR
  • MID
  • MP3
  • WAV
  • WMA
    Video Playback:
  • h.264 / AVC
    Messaging:
  • SMS
  • MMS

Hardware

    CPU : OMAP 4460
    CPU Clock Speed : 1200 Mhz
    Core : 2
    Ram : 1000 MB
    Internal Storage : 32 GB
    Front Facing Camera :
    Camera Resolution :5 MP
    Camera Features:
  • Auto focus
  • Flash
  • 1080p Video Recording
    Sensors:
  • Accelerometer
  • Ambient light
  • Proximity
    QWERTY :
Cellular Network
    Network Technology:
  • CDMA
    CDMA Band:
  • 900
  • 1900
Device Connectivity
    Wi-Fi:
  • 802.11b
  • 802.11g
  • 802.11n
    Bluetooth:
  • Bluetooth 3.0
    Location Features:
  • Compass
  • GPS
  • Cellular location
  • Wi-Fi location
    FM Radio :
    NFC :

[via +Vincent Nguyen]


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LG and Prada invites us to see its 2012 collection in London, we dust off the tux

No sooner had the LG and Prada partnership reappeared in benchmark tests did this glossy JPEG arrive at our inbox. Vowing to show us “the new Prada Phone by LG 3.0,” we’re undergoing a rigorous fashion transformation in preparation, and will be there next Wednesday night to clue you in on what the collaboration’s got up its perfectly-ironed sleeves.

LG and Prada invites us to see its 2012 collection in London, we dust off the tux originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 09 Dec 2011 07:02:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Samsung Galaxy S II overclocked to 1.6 GHz destroys benchmarks, nearly 7800 in Quadrant

WOW is all I have to say. We see benchmarks almost daily between custom ROM’s, new versions of Android, and devices that have beefed up or new dual-core processors. What we have today is the popular and widely known standard Bell Galaxy S II that has been tweaked, hacked, and manhandled to achieve one of the highest Quadrant benchmark tests we’ve ever seen. All the details on this crazy overclock and high performing kernel can be found below.

This bad boy running with one of the most popular kernels for the Galaxy S II known as SiyahKernel v2.1, manages to score almost 7800 in Quadrant Advanced — yes I said 7800, but its 7778 to be exact. I know some might mention that Quadrant results can be faked but this came right from a few friends of ours over on Google+ that love tweaking and overclocking their Android devices as much as we do. Cheers to Jamie Doege and Simms for the results shown above.

Jamie states that he’s running Checkrom v2.0.0 for the original Galaxy S II with SiyahKernel v2.1.1 clocked at 1.6 GHz to achieve the perfect winning combination for these deadly benchmark results. Take into consideration that stock the Galaxy S II scores around 3600 give or take, as shown in our original review here, these results just look even more impressive. We overclocked the G2x to 1.5 GHz and were able to squeeze out around 4600 in Quadrant but getting nearly 8000 is jut downright crazy. I think it’s safe to say the Samsung Galaxy S II is the new benchmark king, as if we didn’t know that already.

The links below will give you all the information you need if you feel like giving this ROM and custom kernel a try yourself. As usual try these sorts of crazy things at your own risk but most of all, have fun and enjoy it.

Checkrom v2.0
SiyahKernel v2.1

SGSII quad 7800
Quad 7800

[via Jamie Doege] — Thanks Simms

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Mobile Miscellany: week of October 3, 2011

This week was packed with news on the mobile front, so it was easy to miss a few stories here and there. Here’s some of the other stuff that happened in the wide world of wireless for the week of October 3, 2011:

  • The Pantech Hotshot featurephone (above left) launched on Verizon this week. It’s a full 3.2-inch touchscreen with a 3.2 megapixel camera and video capture. It’s offered for $100 with a two-year contract. [PhoneScoop]
  • AT&T launched the Pantech Link II (above right) this week, a follow-up to the popular Quick Messaging Device. It features BREW mobile 1.0.2 and is available for $10 with a two-year commitment.
  • Cincinnati Bell launched the HTC Sensation 4G for $250 with a two-year contract and after a $50 mail-in rebate.
  • The HTC Amaze 4G is heading north. Canadian carrier Telus has given the device its own piece of real estate on its site, having it listed as “coming soon.” [AndroidCentral]
  • According to benchmark tests, the Sony Ericsson Nozumi actually has a 1.5GHz dual-core Qualcomm CPU and uses Android 2.3.5. [LandofDroid]
  • Open Range Communications, a WiMAX provider in the Denver area, is laying off more than a hundred employees, shutting down its WiMAX service to new customers and the CEO resigned. [PhoneScoop]
  • Prefer the Washington Post over the New York Times? The former has its own Android app now available in the Market for free. [AndroidCentral]
  • The Nokia N9 is now officially for sale in Australia, on Telstra. Vodafone and Optus haven’t put the device on sale yet, though both companies have announced intentions to do so at some point. [ComputerWorld]

Mobile Miscellany: week of October 3, 2011 originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 08 Oct 2011 11:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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AT&T Samsung Galaxy S II Review [Video]

Welcome back to one of the quickest and highest selling Android-based smartphone series in the Google-based mobil OS’ history, here representing with the AT&T version of the Samsung Galaxy S II. This device is the third smartphone to be released with the Galaxy S II name attached, and it’s certainly not the last, having been preceded by the original international edition Galaxy S II and the largest display-having version yet in the Galaxy S II Epic 4G Touch, followed here in the states by the T-Mobile version (also titled Galaxy S II), it having the same large display as the Epic 4G Touch at 4.5-inches but with a different processor than all released versions at this time. This 4.32-inch Super AMOLED Plus display-having dual-core chip toting handset is under the magnifying glass today here by yours truly at Android Community.

Before we go anywhere, have a look here at our unboxing and hands-on video with this device so that you’ve got an alright idea of what you’re getting into. Then head down for a relatively large amount of videos and photos and words galore composed to make you understand the device at hand.

AT&T Samsung Galaxy S II Unboxing and Hands-on

Hardware

We’ve had some time now with the other two versions of this device that’ve been released now, noting here that the AT&T version is thus far the closest version we’ve seen to the original SGSII release, it having the same display size and type, the same processor – the Samsung-made Exynos dual-core SoC clocked at 1.2GHz. [Note here that the next version of this device, the T-Mobile SGSII, will feature a processor created by an entirely different manufacturer.] The version of the Exynos SoC we’ve got here is one of the top two if not THE top dual-core processor we’ve come in contact with thus far for Android devices as evidenced by a collection of benchmark tests we performed back a couple of months ago. As you’ll see in the Performance section of this review, this remains true today here in the AT&T version of the SGSII.

The chassis on this device, though not absolutely precisely as thin as the original, are still the thinnest on a dual-core device on AT&T – this is also true of each of the other versions of the SGSII for each of their carriers smartphone collections. This phone is also amongst the lightest if not the lightest dual-core device on any carrier, this due in part to the fact that the majority of the device is made of light plastic. This plastic is not light in a way that makes it feel cheap, however, this entire device feeling rather classy and high-quality whilst making a call or tapping away at the web.

You’ll find a standard headphone jack at the top aside one of two noise-canceling microphone holes, the other at the bottom of the device aside a microUSB port – this USB port is also MHL enabled, this meaning that you’ve only to grab your Samsung MHL converter cable to run full-sized HDMI out (at 1080p, no less). At the back of the device on the opposite side of the mic is a speaker grill, this grill sitting inside the smooth part of the plastic which wraps around all parts of the device that aren’t the display glass or the battery cover. This battery cover features the GALAXY S II logo in the center in raised matte silver lettering while the bulk of the cover is comprised of a teeny-tiny pebble pattern which makes for a lovely feeling in the hand.

The back-facing camera appears very similar to the original SGSII’s composition, it having a silver ring, circular ribs for the cover, and lens aside single-LED flash horizontally – below the flash is 8.0 MEGA to remind you of the rating for the camera’s photo-taking abilities, while you must remember 1080p for video on your own. More on this in the Camera section below.

On the right of the device is a single power/lock button, on the right is your volume knob, and on the front you’ll find your classic light-up haptic-feedback set of Android menu buttons below a tiny silvery SAMSUNG logo. This is below your 4.32-inch Super AMOLED display, above which the AT&T logo sits at the same scale as the logo below, a speaker grill above this. Your front-facing camera sits to the left aside light and proximity sensors, while your notification light sits hidden on the opposite side of the speaker grill.

You’ll find the display to be as bright as you’ve ever seen a display be and the pixels as dense as you’ve likely ever seen them, this device amongst the highest definition smartphones on the market today. Though the other two SGSII devices have a slightly larger 4.5-inch display, your humble narrator has found that when faced with a Samsung device at that size or this size, this size feels more like the sweet spot. This is after having used the Samsung Infuse 4G (also 4.5-inch Super AMOLED Plus) for several weeks and the SGSII Epic 4G Touch for a couple weeks. To see both Super AMOLED Plus displays side by side, simply head to your AT&T store and ask to hold the Infuse 4G next to this SGSII.

One thing I’d like to see samsung push for, and I’ve noted this before, is more metal. No matter how nice the device feels with this plastic molded in such a precise way that it looks like metal, it simply cannot feel like metal, and at the moment it is metal, more than almost anything else, that makes a smartphone instantly seem high-quality to yours truly. That and curved glass, but that’s a story for a different day. Meanwhile this is the most solidly designed smartphone Samsung has on the market today (with perhaps the exception of the international edition with its lovely central button on the front).

Have a look at this hands-on video from when we got to check this device out for the first time at the launch event in New York City:

AT&T Samsung Galaxy S II pre-release hands-on

Then check out our brief encounter with the upcoming accessories for the device as well:

Samsung Galaxy S II accessories eyes-on video

Software

There’s a slew of new apps here on the Samsung Galaxy S II with AT&T, many of them exclusive to this line of devices, straight outta Samsung. Aside from your Google apps like Gmail, Music, and the Android Market, you’ve got such helpful apps as Kies air (see below) and Media Hub (which allows you to view movie trailers, and rent or download both movies and TV shows.) Samsung also adds Social Hub (for Facebook, Twitter, and the like — Samsung! Where is Google+?), and a rather well-marketed and well-working voice command system powered by Vlingo.

ac_apps0
ac_apps1
ac_apps2
ac_apps3
ac_mediahub
ac_photoeditor
ac_photoeditor2
ac_qik
ac_taskmanager
ac_tilt
ac_ui_options
ac_ui_options5
ac_ui_options6
ac_ui_options7
ac_videoeditor
ac_voicecommand
ac_voicerecord

There’s a lovely app by the name of Featured Apps on this version of the Galaxy S II that’s presented by AT&T and aimed at this phone specifically. Inside you’ll find lovely apps galore, each of them quite well suited to this SGSII environment.

AT&T Samsung Galaxy S II Featured Apps app hands-on

Your user interface is the same (or essentially the same from what I can see here) as what we’ve seen on the Epic 4G Touch, this including your ability to resize widgets for a fit that’s what Samsung calls their magazine-style on your homescreens and a rather impressive set of ways to edit both your homescreens and your apps drawer in various ways. Have a look at the following two videos and see what you’ve got in store. Note that the first shows Philip Berne showing off the Epic 4G Touch, but that the features he’s showing off in TouchWiz are the same as what you get here in the AT&T SGSII:

Philip Berne hands-on with TouchWiz 2.3 for USA launch of SGSII

Then watch as we get our first look at all the added features in this version of TouchWiz again courtesy of Samsung’s Vice President of Consumer & Enterprise Services Gavin Kim at the SGSII USA launch event as well, all of this taking place in NYC.

Gavin Kim presents USA added TouchWiz 3.4 features rundown

In particular, again, be sure to check out Kies Air when and if you get this device in your hands – it’s slick – one button and you’ve got the entire contents of your smartphone available from any browser on any device inside the same wireless network:

ac_kiesair
ac_kiesair2
ac_kiesair3

You’re running on the Exynos 1.2GHz dual-core processor here, so you’re going to be zipping along as fast as your fingers can carry you. You can play any app that isn’t specific to a different processor (there’s a collection that only works on NVIDIA, for example) or to a different version of Android (the only example being Honeycomb at the moment as it’s specifically tablet-sized), with everything you can play or work with here working at its peak performance. This combined with the rather well-working AT&T HSPA+ 4G network here on this device AND the fact that you can take a screenshot simply by holding the Home button and tapping the Power button made the review process for this device a real breeze. Have a look here first at some speed benchmarks and marvel at how well the AT&T HSPA+ appears to be working:

ac_speedtest_01
ac_speedtest_02

Then witness the firepower of this fully armed and operational battle station with some SGSII benchmarks of all kinds, including AnTuTu, Quadrant (standard and advanced), Linpack (not pro because it rarely works on any device we test it on), CF-Bench, Smartbench (2011 and 2010), and Vellamo.

ac_antutu01
ac_antutu02
ac_cfbench1
ac_cfbench2
ac_cfbench3
ac_linpack1
ac_linpack2
ac_linpack3
ac_linpack4
ac_linpack5
ac_linpack6
ac_linpack7
ac_quadrant
ac_quadrantadvanced
ac_smartbench2010
ac_sunspider
ac_vellamo1
ac_vellamo2

Remember also that the kernel source for this device is already released, this meaning that not only are new ROMs and other hacks galore on their way, the original Galaxy S II creations on the underground circuit are sure to make their way over to this version soon too!

Camera and Battery

The battery time on this device isn’t quite the magical multi-day no-charge masterpiece that its predecessor, the original Galaxy S II, was. Instead you’ve got a device that, with a few minutes charge here and there (as evidenced in the following image), you’ll get days of work without a problem. This isn’t the massive battery drainer you’re used to with other dual-core, 4G, bright-screen-having devices. Instead Samsung has come one step closer to making the outdated science of regular rechargeable batteries a non-issue.

The camera you’ve got here is top class for USA-based devices and certainly high up there for the rest of the world as well. The only reason I’d say this isn’t the top camera on a smartphone in the world right at this moment is, for example, the Nokia N8 has a 12 megapixel camera – but then again, it can only record video in 720p. The Samsung Galaxy S II records video in 1080p and takes photos at 8 megapixels, and the camera app isn’t half bad, having a customizable interface and many different shooting modes and sizes galore.

Have a look at some photo examples and a video example below to see the full fury:

ac_photo_01
ac_photo_02
ac_photo_03

Wrap-Up

What you’ve got here is the most high-quality smartphone to have been released by Samsung here in the United States thus far. I’d even go so far as to choose this version over the original Galaxy S II because of its improved user interface, (candy de-rezzed, icons clean, and all the rest), and of course, the price (2-year contract notwithstanding). You can grab this phone from AT&T on the 2nd of October, 2011, for $199.99, and believe you me, it’s worth every penny.

Samsung has optimized the Samsung Galaxy S II to be the best Android smartphone on the planet, and if you ask me, that’s exactly what it is. For now. It’s got the most advanced version of Samsung’s vision for an ideal device, and here they are to be trusted. Samsung is, on the other hand, creating more versions of the Galaxy S II every day, and until we’ve got them all in our hands, and until Android ceases to be an operating system, there will be no best device.

At the moment though, this is certainly one of the best. Texas Instruments OMAP4 is ramping up to be a magical dual-core processor in some fantastic future devices and NVIDIA still holds their ground on both the smartphone AND tablet front with their seemingly omnipotent Tegra 2 processor, but as you well know, Samsung has brought it’s A-game and it’s jamming on all opponents.

ac_attlogo
ac_batterycover
ac_bottomplug
ac_bottomup_full
ac_cameraface
ac_hanginout
ac_headphonejack
ac_hero
ac_hero2
ac_justchillin
ac_mhl
ac_powerbutton
ac_speakerhole
ac_texture
ac_volume

Device Specifications and Information
Device Info

    Device Name : Galaxy S II
    Manufactuer : Samsung
    Carrier : AT&T
    Announced Date : February 13, 2011
    Release Date : April 28, 2011
    Also Known As :

Display

  • Screen Size : 4.27 Inch
  • Resolution : 480×800
  • Screen Type : Super AMOLED Plus
Dimension & Weight

  • Height : 4.93 Inch
  • Width : 2.6 Inch
  • Depth : .33 Inch
  • Weight : 116 Grams
Battery & Power
    Battery Type:
  • Lithium Ion
  • Battery Capacity : 1650 mAh
  • Talk Time : NA
  • Stand By Time : 710 hours
Software
    Android OS:
  • 2.3.x
    Audio Playback:
  • AAC
  • AAC+
  • MP3
    Video Playback:
  • h.263
  • h.264 / AVC
  • MPEG-4 (MP4)
    Messaging:
  • SMS
  • MMS

Hardware

    CPU : Exynos
    CPU Clock Speed : 1200 Mhz
    Core : 2
    Ram : 1000 MB
    Internal Storage : 16 GB
    Front Facing Camera :
    Camera Resolution :8 MP
    External Storage:
  • MicroSD
  • MicroSDHC
    Camera Features:
  • Auto focus
  • Flash
  • 1080p Video Recording
  • 720p Video Recording
    Sensors:
  • Accelerometer
  • Proximity
    QWERTY :
Cellular Network
    Network Technology:
  • GSM
    GSM Band:
  • 850
  • 900
  • 1800
  • 1900
Device Connectivity
    Wi-Fi:
  • 802.11b
  • 802.11g
  • 802.11n
    Bluetooth:
  • Bluetooth 3.0
    Location Features:
  • Compass
  • GPS
  • Cellular location
  • Wi-Fi location
    FM Radio :

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AT&T Samsung Galaxy S II Unboxing and Hands-on [Video]

In the mail today we’ve received a lovely surprise, no less than the AT&T version of the Samsung Galaxy S II. What we’ve got for you below is a full hands-on rundown of the features you’ll be working with here on the AT&T iteration of this device specifically along with a brief review of what this device will contain in our full review. Remember that this is not the first time the Galaxy S II has been released here in the states, but it is the closest we’ve gotten to the original version yet – more on that in the deep! AT&T, are you the best carrier of this device yet?

What this AT&T version has that the Epic 4G Touch does not is a whole tiny handful of things, most of them carrier-specific apps. The most obvious point of difference you’ll notice right away though is the size of the display. While the Epic 4G Touch has an enlarged 4.5-inch display, the AT&T Galaxy S II has the same 4.32-inch display that the original (international) version of the device. Of course there are quite a few differences between the original and any of the USA versions of this device, apps and the giant joystick on the original being the most obvious.

The good thing we can rely on here is the original Samsung Exynos dual-core processor clocked in at 1.2 GHz. This is one of the most powerful dual-core processors on the market today and has beaten out several other dual-core processors in benchmark tests here on Android Community in the past. This device might be the last (of two) devices in the USA to carry this exact processor, the first one being the Epic 4G Touch. You can see in the video in this post that the device is made to fit nicely in the hand and hit the sweet spot for optimal everyday use as well as screen brightness and sharpness with its Super AMOLED Plus display.

We’re looking forward very much to taking this device through the obstacle course soon to give you a good idea what you’re looking at for the October release. My own first impression is that I’ll be using this version much more than I’ve used the Epic 4G Touch simply because the WiMAX (and the 3G, for that matter,) have been very unreliable thus far AND because this 4.32-inch display seems like, again, the sweet spot for optimal everyday use.

Check out the video and let us know what you need to know about this device so I can answer all your questions in the full review!

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HP TouchPad with Cyanogenmod Benchmarked [Early Build]

If you’ve got a TouchPad and you’re here reading Android Community, chances are you know what CyanongenMod 7 is and what it means for TouchPad users. Last we spoke, CyanogenMod was THIS CLOSE to being complete – of course even THIS CLOSE is relative, so we’re still not quite there yet. That said, some intrepid folks out there in alpha-build-land have taken it upon themselves to benchmark the still incomplete software / hardware combo. Would you like to know more? Click!

Of course getting CyanogenMod working on your TouchPad isn’t the only reason why you may have purchased the ultra-inexpensive tablet, reading John Scheible’s analysis of the situation should give you a handful of reasons why an Android user may have jumped on the situation. It’s time to take a check though of what it could basically feel like to roll with the Cyan flavoring of Android via some basic benchmark tests. A mister fattire from RootzWiki took a few minutes out of his otherwise busy day to rack up these tests for you!

The closest to average scores for Linpack were as follows:

[multithread]
MFLOPS 70.958
Time: 2.38 seconds
Norm Res: 3.24
Precision 2.220446049250313E-16

[single thread]
MFLOPS: 44.333
Time 1.89 Seconds
Norm Res 5.68
Precision: 2.220446049250313E-16

Then there’s some information on Quadrant and frames per second tests:

~28fps on the fractal thing ~6fps (!) on the staircase ~60fps (!) on the planets, & 25 fps on the DNA.

And the final score is thus: 2753.

Mister fattire reminds us of course that all of this is for fun for so many more reasons than one, and to take it all with a grain of salt and pepper.

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Droid Bionic’s Browser Benchmarked

We’ve got some images from a browser benchmark on the Droid Bionic. While benchmark tests don’t always mirror real-world usage, this at least gives us somewhere to start when comparing. While the Bionic is running full blur, it look the lead over a stock Nexus One running Android 2.3.4 (as it certainly should with it’s dual-core goodness). Initial thoughts in the report was that the phone is extremely light, pretty thin, and boots up very quickly. I can’t wait to see this phone in person it looks to be a solid device for sure. Hit up the break for the Bionic and Nexus comparison images.

Read More…

Droid Bionic’s Browser Benchmarked


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Review: Verizon Samsung Droid Charge [video]

The Droid Charge, one of the most popular phones on Verizon’s network, has found its way into TalkAndroid’s house, so what are we to do with it? Review it, of course! We were able to get our grubby little paws on Verizon’s pride and joy, and we must say, we’re impressed. The 4.3″ Super AMOLED Plus display is gorgeous, with deep darks and vibrant brights. The interface is snappy, and, while the benchmark tests don’t come back as astounding, you would never know it. Touchwiz is present, but heavily saturated with the Droid feel we’ve come to know and love – mainly from Motorola.

All in all, Samsung did a great job with this device. The physical aspects of the phone are great as well, with a slick back and a form factor that makes it steady, although some may complain it’s too big. However, this writer found it to be well-built and worth his time.

Be sure to hit the break to see the unboxing and review videos, and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments.

Quick note – keep your eyes peeled over the coming hours, as we may have some big news involving a Droid Charge… the suspense!

Read More…

Review: Verizon Samsung Droid Charge


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Unboxing – Verizon Motorola Droid X2

The Motorola Droid X2 from Verizon has been crazy popular since it came out a couple of months ago. If you haven’t managed to get your hands on it yet, that’s okay… because we did that part for you. Today, we’ll be going through a quick unboxing and look at the X2, and later we’ll be giving you a full review, complete with a rundown of some benchmark tests and carrier comparisons.

Be sure to check out the video below, and let us know what you think of the device in the comments below.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Unboxing – Verizon Motorola Droid X2


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