Posts Tagged break

NVIDIA Project Shield photo gallery

Android Central

CES hasn't even officially begun yet, and already we've had what might be the biggest Android announcement of the show — NVIDIA's Project Shield. A hand-held Android-powered games console running NVIDIA's new Tegra 4 chip, Shield promises the ability to run Android games from Google Play and Tegrazone, as well as games streamed through a PC with a GeForce GPU.

We still don't know anything about when you'll be able to get your hands on Project Shield, or how much it'll cost, but what we can show you is a selection of photos of the device from today's NVIDIA press event in Las Vegas.

You can find 'em after the break, along with today's press release.

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Live from NVIDIA’s CES press event!

Android Central

Android Central @ CESOK, boys and girls. We're actually still some 36 hours short of the start of CES, but things get really cooking tonight. We're here at Rain nightclub at The Palms with none other than graphics guru NVIDIA. Frankly, we've got no idea what's coming. An update to the Tegra 3 platform in the form of Tegra 4? Good guess. Something more? It wouldn't surprise us in the least.

We've got it all coming at you after the break. Streaming video, our liveblog commentary and photos — and you're along for the ride. The show gets going at 8 p.m. Pacific time, or 11 p.m. on the East Cost. Let's go!

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Canopy Sensus case adds backscreen and side touch to iPhones (hands-on)

Canopy Sensus iPhone case hands-on

Canopy promised a whole new world of smartphone control with its Sensus iPhone case in the fall, and we’ve at last had a chance to gauge how well it works here at CES. If you’ll recall, it delivers 10-point touch input across the back and sides that let apps add interaction without blocking the screen — think of the PlayStation Vita’s back touch and you’ve got the idea. That theoretically sounds great for gamers, but we’d like to see how well it works outside of a dedicated console.

In practice, the case isn’t much different in dimensions to a standard protective iPhone case, if a little chunkier along the base. The whole thing locks in to the iPhone 4′s connector. although there’s still another port to charge through there. The case also has integrated apps attuned for the blind, with braille entry possible using all those multiple touchpanels. We’ve got a quick tour of how it all works after the break and you can expect to land this summer, where pricing will be somewhere between $59 and $99.

Mat Smith contributed to this report.

Continue reading Canopy Sensus case adds backscreen and side touch to iPhones (hands-on)

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Source: Canopy

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Fulton Innovation to demo tablet that doubles as wireless charging mat at CES

Fulton Innovation introduces tablet that doubles as Qicompatible mat

Fulton Innovation comes to CES each year armed with the latest tricks in the field of wireless charging, and this year is no exception. Starting things out with a bang, the purveyor of all things Qi will be on-hand to demonstrate its newest feat: the ability to charge your Qi-compatible phone… on the back of a tablet. Indeed, your 7- to 10-inch slate may someday be able to double as its own wireless charging mat, allowing you to feed battery from your tablet to your smartphone just by holding the two devices back-to-back.

Additionally, Fulton promises to show off a multi-device charging platform capable of powering up two devices simultaneously. Even better, this surface can recognize and adapt to the needs of each particular product — in other words, tablets and smartphones can charge together on the same pad, each device receiving the proper amount of juice. Check out the video and press release past the break to see a few ideas Fulton is bringing to the table this week, and fortunately we’ll get to take a closer look at all of them soon.

Continue reading Fulton Innovation to demo tablet that doubles as wireless charging mat at CES

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Apps of the Week: Super Monsters Ate My Condo!, Netflix New Releases, AntennaPod and more!

Apps of the Week

We said we'd be back in 2013 with our weekly app picks, and here we are. Trying to start off the year right before some of us make the trip to Las Vegas for CES 2013, we've got a whole grouping of great picks for you this week. A mix of games, utilities and overall fun apps can be found here, so stick around after the break and see how we did.

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AT&T Lights Up Several New LTE Markets In Michigan

4glte

After a short break for holiday festivities, AT&T continues their nationwide rollout of their 4G LTE service today with several new markets lighting up. As a Michigan resident, it’s great to see AT&T lighting up some of the lower populated areas. The carrier is getting to the point where they have covered most major markets in the United States, and as of late, it seems like they’re working on some of the lower populated areas as well. Users with a LTE-compatible handset will see the blazing fast data speeds in the markets below.

  • Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • Beverly Hills, Michigan
  • Birmingham, Michigan
  • Monroe County, Michigan
  • Kent County, Michigan

Now if only AT&T could rollout LTE in the Lapeer county area! We should start to see a whole lot more of these smaller rollouts through 2013 though. AT&T has plans to cover 80% of American citizens by the end of the year.

Has anyone in these areas tested out the fast data speeds yet? Are you liking it? Make sure to let us know in the comments section below!

AT&T Expands 4G LTE Coverage In Ann Arbor, Beverly Hills And Birmingham

Additional Cell Sites Upgraded to 4G LTE as Part of Ongoing AT&T Investment in Local Wireless Network

DETROIT, Jan. 4, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — As part of its continuing network investment and ongoing 4G LTE rollout, AT&T* has upgraded three mobile Internet cell sites in Ann Arbor, Beverly Hills and Birmingham to expand AT&T 4G LTE coverage for area residents and businesses.

AT&T 4G LTE is the latest generation of wireless network technology and provides several benefits for local residents, including faster mobile Internet speeds —up to 10 times faster than 3G, improved performance and innovative new 4G LTE-compatible devices.

AT&T launched its ultra-fast 4G LTE network in Detroit in September 2012. The new cell sites are one part of AT&T’s ongoing efforts to expand 4G LTE coverage and to drive investment and innovation to deliver the nation’s best, most advanced mobile Internet experience for customers.

AT&T Expands 4G LTE Coverage To More Monroe County Customers

Additional Cell Site Upgraded to 4G LTE as Part of Ongoing AT&T Investment in Local Wireless Network

MONROE, Mich., Jan. 4, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — As part of its continuing network investment and ongoing 4G LTE rollout, AT&T* has upgraded one mobile Internet cell site in Lambertville to expand AT&T 4G LTE coverage for area residents and businesses.

“AT&T’s innovation and investment in Monroe County means bringing the next generation of technology to local families and job providers,” said State Rep. Dale Zorn (R-Ida).  “Partners like AT&T and this next-generation technology are helping keep southeast Michigan competitive in the global economy.”

AT&T 4G LTE is the latest generation of wireless network technology and provides several benefits for local residents, including faster mobile Internet speeds up to 10 times faster than 3G — improved performance and innovative new 4G LTE-compatible devices.

AT&T launched its ultra-fast 4G LTE network in Monroe County in November 2012. The new cell site is one part of AT&T’s ongoing efforts to expand 4G LTE coverage and to drive investment and innovation to deliver the nation’s best, most advanced mobile Internet experience for customers.

AT&T Expands 4G LTE Coverage To Kent & Ottawa Counties

Additional Cell Sites Upgraded to 4G LTE as Part of Ongoing AT&T Investment in Local Wireless Network

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., Jan. 4, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — As part of its continuing network investment and ongoing 4G LTE rollout, AT&T* has upgraded 4 mobile Internet cell sites throughout Grand Rapids to expand AT&T 4G LTE coverage for area residents and businesses.

AT&T 4G LTE is the latest generation of wireless network technology and provides several benefits for local residents, including faster mobile Internet speeds —up to 10 times faster than 3G, improved performance and innovative new 4G LTE-compatible devices.

AT&T launched its ultra-fast 4G LTE network in Detroit in September 2012. The new cell sites are one part of AT&T’s ongoing efforts to expand 4G LTE coverage and to drive investment and innovation to deliver the nation’s best, most advanced mobile Internet experience for customers.

“Our goal is for our customers to have an extraordinary experience, and they’ll be able to download, upload, stream and game faster than ever before on our 4G LTE network,” said Jim Murray, president, AT&T Michigan. “As part of the Metro Detroit community, we’re always looking for new opportunities to provide enhanced coverage, and our investment in the local wireless network is another way we’re accomplishing that.”

AT&T’s 4G Network
AT&T’s innovation and investment have resulted in the nation’s largest 4G network, covering 275 million people with ultra-fast speeds and a more consistent user experience. That’s coverage in 3,000 more 4G cities and towns than Verizon.

AT&T is the only U.S. service provider to deploy two compatible 4G technologies to deliver more speed to more customers. Our 4G LTE network delivered faster average download speeds than any of our competitors in PCWorld’s most recent 13-market speed tests.

 

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The week in international Android news – Jan. 5

Android Central

Happy New Year! CES is literally days away from us now, and with Alex en-route to Las Vegas as we speak, it falls to me to round up the weeks international Android news. CES leaks and rumors have dominated the headlines as we might expect since we returned from the holiday break, but there's been plenty to talk about since our last international round up.

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New ‘Amber Brown’ Galaxy Note 2 shows up again, this time in real photos

Amber Brown Galaxy Note 2

Quickly following on the heels of leaked renders of two new colors of the Galaxy Note 2, we've got some real hands-on images of the Amber Brown version of the device. The device seems to be all the same as the other Note 2 varieties, but now covered in a deep brown color. This is probably going to be a bit of a polarizing color — either love it or hate it — if we have to be honest, but more options are always better. This model is a Japanese version for the carrier NTT Docomo but it's feasible that we could see this color, along with the new "Ruby Wine" (aka red) color, come to other markets also.

We've got one more look at the device for you after the break. The source link below has several more with pictures of the box, accessories and color-matched brown flip cover as well.

Source: GizChina

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T-Mobile to offer truly unlimited data on Monthly 4G prepaid plans

T-Mobile Prepaid SIM

Just a few months after debuting its truly unlimited data plan for contract customers, T-Mobile will begin offering the same service option to Monthly 4G prepaid customers as well. Prior to this, the highest tier of the Monthly 4G service was $70 for unlimited talk, text and data — with a throttle after 5GB of usage. It seems that this level will be replaced by a plan of the same price with truly unlimited, unthrottled data. This is a great move for T-Mobile, especially as it moves more of its spectrum to the 1900MHz frequency for HSPA+, which opens up possibilities to a whole host of new unlocked devices. Monthly 4G plans are prepaid, require no credit check or contract and can be used with any unlocked GSM device that supports its frequencies.

TmoNews claims the service will go live just a few short days from now on January 9th, and we'll be sure to check back in and see if that is the case. We've got a picture of the marketing materials for the plans for you to check out after the break. There's another image and more information at the source link below as well.

Source: TmoNews

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What I used in 2012: Andrew Martonik

Andrew's Picks

We cover a whole lot of news here on Android Central, from phones and tablets to apps, accessories and a whole lot more. We put these products and services through their paces harder than most, so when something stands out enough to be used by one of the writers daily, it's usually the cream of the crop. Stick around after the break and see what I used throughout 2012.

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BlackBerry Z10 parts reportedly surface, include a 4.3-inch display

BlackBerry Z10 parts surface, reportedly include a 43inch display

The pieces of the BlackBerry Z10 puzzle are slowly coming together — and today, that’s almost literally true. ETrade Supply has obtained what’s claimed to be the LCD, touchscreen digitizer and housings for RIM’s future flagship device. The more production-worthy components appear to fit together properly, and they hint at a mid-size smartphone with a 4.3-inch screen and a microSD card slot. The biggest surprise may be the SIM slot, whose position varies depending on the parts at hand: the incongruity could either reflect late-stage design tweaks or else variants for different networks. We’ll have to sit tight until January 30th to know what the individual elements represent when they’re part of a working device, but those who don’t mind seeing an upcoming phone in its rawest form can catch a video after the break.

Continue reading BlackBerry Z10 parts reportedly surface, include a 4.3-inch display

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Via: N4BB

Source: ETrade Supply (1), (2)

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Agenda for Android: The iOS calendar favorite makes the leap

Agenda for AndroidAgenda for Android.

Looks like I just found my new calendar app. Agenda — long a favorite on iOS — has made its way to Android. (It's currently $1.99.) It ties into your Google calendars, of course, but it's the interface that's much improved over what Google's given us. The basic UI is much cleaner in black-and-white (the colors you see here are my custom label colors) and moreover you can swipe left and right to change from a year-at-a-glance view, to monthly, to daily and agenda, to single events.  There's a clear button for adding events, the bullseye takes you to the current day, and you can pick and choose which calendars to display.

It's still slightly rough around the edges — the odd crash, and vertical scrolling could be a little smoother. But for form and function, Agenda's among the best we've seen, though we'd love to see some sort of agenda widget to go along with it.

We've got more screenies after the break. Hit the link above to give it a go for yourself.

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Dan Morrill shows us the Android mascot that almost was

Back in 2007, it was impossible to know that Android was going to blow up and become as huge as it is today. In fact, for quite some time, it was impossible to know if Android even existed, as Google kept quiet on the flood of rumors until it came time to officially unveil the mobile OS. In the lead up to this announcement, we imagine many things about Android changed, and today Google’s Dan Morrill is giving us a look at a canned Android mascot he thought up in the rush before the company launched the first iteration of the OS we all know and love today.

dandroidred-w580

Believe it or not, that guy you see above was almost Android’s mascot – a far cry from the Bugdroid that has worked its way into out hearts over the years. Morrill explains the creation of these robots, which have come to be called Dandroids, on his Google+ page. Apparently, these Dandroids were born out of a last-minute need to have a mascot for the internal developer launch of Android:

My job was developer relations, but I took a much-needed break of a couple hours and spent some quality time with Inkscape to create these… things.

See, we were prepping for an internal developer launch (meaning, we were going to ask Googlers to start fooling with the APIs and give us early feedback), and I had no eye candy for the slides we were putting together. Hence these guys.

Even though the Dandroids experienced a period of popularity around Google’s offices, that all came to a screeching halt when Irina Blok introduced the Bugdroid, which would ultimately become Android’s mascot. We have to be honest and say that we like ol’ Bugdroid a fair bit better than these Dandroids, but it’s interesting to learn that these guys were almost the Android mascots nonetheless.

dandroidyellow-w580

It would seem that Morrill put a significant amount of work into these as well, posting pictures of Dandroids in red, yellow, green, and blue. Morrill says he found these images while cleaning out an old NAS, so perhaps there are more fascinating tidbits from the early days of Android hidden away on that server? One can only hope. In the meantime, let us know what you think of these Dandroids!

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Dailymotion app updated with new UI and features

Dailymotion

Dailymotion Streaming Video, an app that is the second largest video provider on the internet, has just updated its app substantially in both design and functionality. This newest version — 3.0.1, to be exact — has a completely overhauled UI that fits nicely into Android 4.0 and above's holo design, taking advantage of the new tabbed interface, overflow settings button and UI fragments.

As if that wasn't enough, there's also a lot of new behind the scenes fixes to improve overall responsiveness of the app. The video player is quicker, there's a new offline mode and improved search suggestions. The latest small update brought many bug fixes to keep everything smooth as well. If you want to know a little more about Dailymotion you can take a look at the press release after the break, or just head straight to the app at the Play Store link above.

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The 2012 Android Central Reader’s Choice Awards

Android Central Awards

Having already presented for your approval (or not) our 2012 Android Central's Editor's Choice Awards, it's now time to turn to something even more important — the Reader's Choice Awards. These are the best smartphones and tablets and apps for which you voted. Over the past few weeks we saw thousands and thousands of votes pour in. Some went as you might expect. Others threw a little bit of a curveball. 

So let's not waste any more time. After the break are your choices. Your picks. Your favorite smartphones and tablets and apps for the past year or so, with a little commentary from your's truly.

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What I used in 2012: Richard Devine

Android Central

And so, with 2012 now behind us, the traditional reflection on the year past begins. Being British, last year was pretty memorable — the Diamond Jubilee celebrations and the Summer Olympics in London two standout moments. We've also seen the mobile world continue to grow at an incredible rate, as our smartphones and tablets become an increasingly integral part of every day life. 

AC's editor-in-chief, Phil Nickinson, couldn't have put it better — "In this job, you can't help but be buried in plastic from time to time." It's true of each member of the team. We talk about devices and apps all day every day, but we don't really talk about what we're using in our own, every day lives. It's been a heck of a year in these parts, so click on past the break to find out what I've been using the most during 2012. 

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How to upload songs to Google Music from your smartphone or tablet using Dropbox

Google Music (now officially known as Play Music) is an incredible product. Google allows you to upload your personal music collection to their servers and stream it from your web browser or any Android device absolutely free! The only bummer is that Google has overlooked an important feature: the ability to upload music purchased outside of the Google Play Store to your Google Music account from your smartphone. Naturally, Google is trying to push users to purchase their music from Google Play, but what if you want to buy your music from the Amazon MP3 store, or download it using some other quasi-legal method (shame, shame).

If your looking to upload music from your Android device, (or even your non-Android device…gasp!), you’ve come to the right place. Jump past the break to learn how!

 

You will need a computer of any kind for this workaround to function properly. Got one? Good! We’ll break up our guide into two parts: Part 1: Setting Up Your Computer, and Part 2: Setting Up Your Phone

 

Setting Up Your Computer

Step 1: If you don’t already have it, download and install Dropbox on your computer (this will entail creating a free account, and they will give you 2GB of free storage for life).

Step 2: Once Dropbox is installed, create a folder within Dropbox called “Google Music from Phone” or something that will make it easy to identify later.

Step 3: Once you’ve got your folder created inside Dropbox, use your web browser to navigate to Google Music. If you don’t already have a Google Music account set up, do that now (it’s free).

Step 4: In the upper right hand corner of your Google Music page, click “Upload Music”. This will prompt you to download Google’s “Music Manager”.

Step 5: Once the download completes, double click the file and let it install on your computer. After it’s installed, it’ll ask you to log in using your Google account. Do that, and then select “upload songs to Google Play”.

Step 6: It’ll ask you where you keep your music collection. Select “other folders” (it’s the last option), then “add folder”. When the window pops up, navigate to your newly created “Google Music from Phone” folder (that should be in your Dropbox) and select it. Click next.

Step 7: This is very important! After you select your “Google Music from Phone” folder as the place that you want Google Music to upload from, the Google Music Manager will ask you: “Do you want to automatically upload songs that you add to your selected folders in the future?” YOU MUST CLICK YES!

Ok, your computer is set up and we’re ready to move onto part 2.

 

Setting Up Your Phone

Step 1: Download the Dropbox mobile application for your smartphone platform (hopefully Android!) and log-in.

Step 2: Download Astro file manager and link it to your Dropbox account.

Step 3: Using Astro file explorer, navigate to the folder where your downloaded music is stored and use the “copy” function to copy the folders that you want uploaded to Google Music.

Step 4: In Astro, click the Dropbox icon, find your “Google Music from Phone” folder, open it, and paste your folders there. (What this does is upload your music files from your phone into the Dropbox folder on you computer, where Google Manager will find them and automatically upload them to your Google Music account!  Give it a few minutes and your music will all be stored on Google’s servers.)

Step 5: If you haven’t already, download the Google Music app, select your account, and enjoy streaming your new music from your phone! All done! Good job!

Hopefully Google will add this feature to their mobile apps in the future, but for now, you just hacked the system! Congratulations!

 

Disclaimer: This will work with Google Drive or any other like service as long as autosyncing is on.

Disclaimer 2: This method will also work with iOS, Windows, and BlackBerry smartphones and tablets

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How to upload songs to Google Music from your smartphone or tablet using Dropbox

Google Music (now officially known as Play Music) is an incredible product. Google allows you to upload your personal music collection to their servers and stream it from your web browser or any Android device absolutely free! The only bummer is that Google has overlooked an important feature: the ability to upload music purchased outside of the Google Play Store to your Google Music account from your smartphone. Naturally, Google is trying to push users to purchase their music from Google Play, but what if you want to buy your music from the Amazon MP3 store, or download it using some other quasi-legal method (shame, shame).

If your looking to upload music from your Android device, (or even your non-Android device…gasp!), you’ve come to the right place. Jump past the break to learn how!

 

You will need a computer of any kind for this workaround to function properly. Got one? Good! We’ll break up our guide into two parts: Part 1: Setting Up Your Computer, and Part 2: Setting Up Your Phone

 

Setting Up Your Computer

Step 1: If you don’t already have it, download and install Dropbox on your computer (this will entail creating a free account, and they will give you 2GB of free storage for life).

Step 2: Once Dropbox is installed, create a folder within Dropbox called “Google Music from Phone” or something that will make it easy to identify later.

Step 3: Once you’ve got your folder created inside Dropbox, use your web browser to navigate to Google Music. If you don’t already have a Google Music account set up, do that now (it’s free).

Step 4: In the upper right hand corner of your Google Music page, click “Upload Music”. This will prompt you to download Google’s “Music Manager”.

Step 5: Once the download completes, double click the file and let it install on your computer. After it’s installed, it’ll ask you to log in using your Google account. Do that, and then select “upload songs to Google Play”.

Step 6: It’ll ask you where you keep your music collection. Select “other folders” (it’s the last option), then “add folder”. When the window pops up, navigate to your newly created “Google Music from Phone” folder (that should be in your Dropbox) and select it. Click next.

Step 7: This is very important! After you select your “Google Music from Phone” folder as the place that you want Google Music to upload from, the Google Music Manager will ask you: “Do you want to automatically upload songs that you add to your selected folders in the future?” YOU MUST CLICK YES!

Ok, your computer is set up and we’re ready to move onto part 2.

 

Setting Up Your Phone

Step 1: Download the Dropbox mobile application for your smartphone platform (hopefully Android!) and log-in.

Step 2: Download Astro file manager and link it to your Dropbox account.

Step 3: Using Astro file explorer, navigate to the folder where your downloaded music is stored and use the “copy” function to copy the folders that you want uploaded to Google Music.

Step 4: In Astro, click the Dropbox icon, find your “Google Music from Phone” folder, open it, and paste your folders there. (What this does is upload your music files from your phone into the Dropbox folder on you computer, where Google Manager will find them and automatically upload them to your Google Music account!  Give it a few minutes and your music will all be stored on Google’s servers.)

Step 5: If you haven’t already, download the Google Music app, select your account, and enjoy streaming your new music from your phone! All done! Good job!

Hopefully Google will add this feature to their mobile apps in the future, but for now, you just hacked the system! Congratulations!

 

Disclaimer: This will work with Google Drive or any other like service as long as autosyncing is on.

Disclaimer 2: This method will also work with iOS, Windows, and BlackBerry smartphones and tablets

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No Comments

How to upload songs to Google Music from your smartphone or tablet using Dropbox

Google Music (now officially known as Play Music) is an incredible product. Google allows you to upload your personal music collection to their servers and stream it from your web browser or any Android device absolutely free! The only bummer is that Google has overlooked an important feature: the ability to upload music purchased outside of the Google Play Store to your Google Music account from your smartphone. Naturally, Google is trying to push users to purchase their music from Google Play, but what if you want to buy your music from the Amazon MP3 store, or download it using some other quasi-legal method (shame, shame).

If your looking to upload music from your Android device, (or even your non-Android device…gasp!), you’ve come to the right place. Jump past the break to learn how!

 

You will need a computer of any kind for this workaround to function properly. Got one? Good! We’ll break up our guide into two parts: Part 1: Setting Up Your Computer, and Part 2: Setting Up Your Phone

 

Setting Up Your Computer

Step 1: If you don’t already have it, download and install Dropbox on your computer (this will entail creating a free account, and they will give you 2GB of free storage for life).

Step 2: Once Dropbox is installed, create a folder within Dropbox called “Google Music from Phone” or something that will make it easy to identify later.

Step 3: Once you’ve got your folder created inside Dropbox, use your web browser to navigate to Google Music. If you don’t already have a Google Music account set up, do that now (it’s free).

Step 4: In the upper right hand corner of your Google Music page, click “Upload Music”. This will prompt you to download Google’s “Music Manager”.

Step 5: Once the download completes, double click the file and let it install on your computer. After it’s installed, it’ll ask you to log in using your Google account. Do that, and then select “upload songs to Google Play”.

Step 6: It’ll ask you where you keep your music collection. Select “other folders” (it’s the last option), then “add folder”. When the window pops up, navigate to your newly created “Google Music from Phone” folder (that should be in your Dropbox) and select it. Click next.

Step 7: This is very important! After you select your “Google Music from Phone” folder as the place that you want Google Music to upload from, the Google Music Manager will ask you: “Do you want to automatically upload songs that you add to your selected folders in the future?” YOU MUST CLICK YES!

Ok, your computer is set up and we’re ready to move onto part 2.

 

Setting Up Your Phone

Step 1: Download the Dropbox mobile application for your smartphone platform (hopefully Android!) and log-in.

Step 2: Download Astro file manager and link it to your Dropbox account.

Step 3: Using Astro file explorer, navigate to the folder where your downloaded music is stored and use the “copy” function to copy the folders that you want uploaded to Google Music.

Step 4: In Astro, click the Dropbox icon, find your “Google Music from Phone” folder, open it, and paste your folders there. (What this does is upload your music files from your phone into the Dropbox folder on you computer, where Google Manager will find them and automatically upload them to your Google Music account!  Give it a few minutes and your music will all be stored on Google’s servers.)

Step 5: If you haven’t already, download the Google Music app, select your account, and enjoy streaming your new music from your phone! All done! Good job!

Hopefully Google will add this feature to their mobile apps in the future, but for now, you just hacked the system! Congratulations!

 

Disclaimer: This will work with Google Drive or any other like service as long as autosyncing is on.

Disclaimer 2: This method will also work with iOS, Windows, and BlackBerry smartphones and tablets

, , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

How to upload songs to Google Music from your smartphone or tablet using Dropbox

Google Music (now officially known as Play Music) is an incredible product. Google allows you to upload your personal music collection to their servers and stream it from your web browser or any Android device absolutely free! The only bummer is that Google has overlooked an important feature: the ability to upload music purchased outside of the Google Play Store to your Google Music account from your smartphone. Naturally, Google is trying to push users to purchase their music from Google Play, but what if you want to buy your music from the Amazon MP3 store, or download it using some other quasi-legal method (shame, shame).

If your looking to upload music from your Android device, (or even your non-Android device…gasp!), you’ve come to the right place. Jump past the break to learn how!

 

You will need a computer of any kind for this workaround to function properly. Got one? Good! We’ll break up our guide into two parts: Part 1: Setting Up Your Computer, and Part 2: Setting Up Your Phone

 

Setting Up Your Computer

Step 1: If you don’t already have it, download and install Dropbox on your computer (this will entail creating a free account, and they will give you 2GB of free storage for life).

Step 2: Once Dropbox is installed, create a folder within Dropbox called “Google Music from Phone” or something that will make it easy to identify later.

Step 3: Once you’ve got your folder created inside Dropbox, use your web browser to navigate to Google Music. If you don’t already have a Google Music account set up, do that now (it’s free).

Step 4: In the upper right hand corner of your Google Music page, click “Upload Music”. This will prompt you to download Google’s “Music Manager”.

Step 5: Once the download completes, double click the file and let it install on your computer. After it’s installed, it’ll ask you to log in using your Google account. Do that, and then select “upload songs to Google Play”.

Step 6: It’ll ask you where you keep your music collection. Select “other folders” (it’s the last option), then “add folder”. When the window pops up, navigate to your newly created “Google Music from Phone” folder (that should be in your Dropbox) and select it. Click next.

Step 7: This is very important! After you select your “Google Music from Phone” folder as the place that you want Google Music to upload from, the Google Music Manager will ask you: “Do you want to automatically upload songs that you add to your selected folders in the future?” YOU MUST CLICK YES!

Ok, your computer is set up and we’re ready to move onto part 2.

 

Setting Up Your Phone

Step 1: Download the Dropbox mobile application for your smartphone platform (hopefully Android!) and log-in.

Step 2: Download Astro file manager and link it to your Dropbox account.

Step 3: Using Astro file explorer, navigate to the folder where your downloaded music is stored and use the “copy” function to copy the folders that you want uploaded to Google Music.

Step 4: In Astro, click the Dropbox icon, find your “Google Music from Phone” folder, open it, and paste your folders there. (What this does is upload your music files from your phone into the Dropbox folder on you computer, where Google Manager will find them and automatically upload them to your Google Music account!  Give it a few minutes and your music will all be stored on Google’s servers.)

Step 5: If you haven’t already, download the Google Music app, select your account, and enjoy streaming your new music from your phone! All done! Good job!

Hopefully Google will add this feature to their mobile apps in the future, but for now, you just hacked the system! Congratulations!

 

Disclaimer: This will work with Google Drive or any other like service as long as autosyncing is on.

Disclaimer 2: This method will also work with iOS, Windows, and BlackBerry smartphones and tablets

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Huawei D2, Mate and W1 reportedly pose for press images

Huawei D2, Mate and W1 reportedly pose for press images

Huawei has already left little doubt as to what we’ll see from its smartphone line at CES. If official teasers aren’t enough, however, well-known phone tipster @evleaks has given Unwired View what’s purported to be press images for the three key introductions. The Ascend W1 Windows Phone (at left) looks much like we’ve seen from live shots, just with newer black and pink hues; the Ascend D2 (right) isn’t quite so rainbow-like, but supports what’s been claimed of the 5-inch phone’s aesthetic and custom interface. A shot for the Ascend Mate (after the break), despite representing the company’s stand-out device, is the least surprising given that executive Richard Yu showed customers the real thing just days ago. We’d still give these images a long look — while there’s chances for inaccuracies or surprises, they may be the best glimpses of Huawei’s early 2013 lineup before we see it first-hand.

Continue reading Huawei D2, Mate and W1 reportedly pose for press images

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Source: Unwired View

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How to upload songs to Google Music from your smartphone or tablet using Dropbox

Google Music (now officially known as Play Music) is an incredible product. Google allows you to upload your personal music collection to their servers and stream it from your web browser or any Android device absolutely free! The only bummer is that Google has overlooked an important feature: the ability to upload music purchased outside of the Google Play Store to your Google Music account from your smartphone. Naturally, Google is trying to push users to purchase their music from Google Play, but what if you want to buy your music from the Amazon MP3 store, or download it using some other quasi-legal method (shame, shame).

If your looking to upload music from your Android device, (or even your non-Android device…gasp!), you’ve come to the right place. Jump past the break to learn how!

 

You will need a computer of any kind for this workaround to function properly. Got one? Good! We’ll break up our guide into two parts: Part 1: Setting Up Your Computer, and Part 2: Setting Up Your Phone

 

Setting Up Your Computer

Step 1: If you don’t already have it, download and install Dropbox on your computer (this will entail creating a free account, and they will give you 2GB of free storage for life).

Step 2: Once Dropbox is installed, create a folder within Dropbox called “Google Music from Phone” or something that will make it easy to identify later.

Step 3: Once you’ve got your folder created inside Dropbox, use your web browser to navigate to Google Music. If you don’t already have a Google Music account set up, do that now (it’s free).

Step 4: In the upper right hand corner of your Google Music page, click “Upload Music”. This will prompt you to download Google’s “Music Manager”.

Step 5: Once the download completes, double click the file and let it install on your computer. After it’s installed, it’ll ask you to log in using your Google account. Do that, and then select “upload songs to Google Play”.

Step 6: It’ll ask you where you keep your music collection. Select “other folders” (it’s the last option), then “add folder”. When the window pops up, navigate to your newly created “Google Music from Phone” folder (that should be in your Dropbox) and select it. Click next.

Step 7: This is very important! After you select your “Google Music from Phone” folder as the place that you want Google Music to upload from, the Google Music Manager will ask you: “Do you want to automatically upload songs that you add to your selected folders in the future?” YOU MUST CLICK YES!

Ok, your computer is set up and we’re ready to move onto part 2.

 

Setting Up Your Phone

Step 1: Download the Dropbox mobile application for your smartphone platform (hopefully Android!) and log-in.

Step 2: Download Astro file manager and link it to your Dropbox account.

Step 3: Using Astro file explorer, navigate to the folder where your downloaded music is stored and use the “copy” function to copy the folders that you want uploaded to Google Music.

Step 4: In Astro, click the Dropbox icon, find your “Google Music from Phone” folder, open it, and paste your folders there. (What this does is upload your music files from your phone into the Dropbox folder on you computer, where Google Manager will find them and automatically upload them to your Google Music account!  Give it a few minutes and your music will all be stored on Google’s servers.)

Step 5: If you haven’t already, download the Google Music app, select your account, and enjoy streaming your new music from your phone! All done! Good job!

Hopefully Google will add this feature to their mobile apps in the future, but for now, you just hacked the system! Congratulations!

 

Disclaimer: This will work with Google Drive or any other like service as long as autosyncing is on.

Disclaimer 2: This method will also work with iOS, Windows, and BlackBerry smartphones and tablets

, , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

How to upload songs to Google Music from your smartphone or tablet using Dropbox

Google Music (now officially known as Play Music) is an incredible product. Google allows you to upload your personal music collection to their servers and stream it from your web browser or any Android device absolutely free! The only bummer is that Google has overlooked an important feature: the ability to upload music purchased outside of the Google Play Store to your Google Music account from your smartphone. Naturally, Google is trying to push users to purchase their music from Google Play, but what if you want to buy your music from the Amazon MP3 store, or download it using some other quasi-legal method (shame, shame).

If your looking to upload music from your Android device, (or even your non-Android device…gasp!), you’ve come to the right place. Jump past the break to learn how!

 

You will need a computer of any kind for this workaround to function properly. Got one? Good! We’ll break up our guide into two parts: Part 1: Setting Up Your Computer, and Part 2: Setting Up Your Phone

 

Setting Up Your Computer

Step 1: If you don’t already have it, download and install Dropbox on your computer (this will entail creating a free account, and they will give you 2GB of free storage for life).

Step 2: Once Dropbox is installed, create a folder within Dropbox called “Google Music from Phone” or something that will make it easy to identify later.

Step 3: Once you’ve got your folder created inside Dropbox, use your web browser to navigate to Google Music. If you don’t already have a Google Music account set up, do that now (it’s free).

Step 4: In the upper right hand corner of your Google Music page, click “Upload Music”. This will prompt you to download Google’s “Music Manager”.

Step 5: Once the download completes, double click the file and let it install on your computer. After it’s installed, it’ll ask you to log in using your Google account. Do that, and then select “upload songs to Google Play”.

Step 6: It’ll ask you where you keep your music collection. Select “other folders” (it’s the last option), then “add folder”. When the window pops up, navigate to your newly created “Google Music from Phone” folder (that should be in your Dropbox) and select it. Click next.

Step 7: This is very important! After you select your “Google Music from Phone” folder as the place that you want Google Music to upload from, the Google Music Manager will ask you: “Do you want to automatically upload songs that you add to your selected folders in the future?” YOU MUST CLICK YES!

Ok, your computer is set up and we’re ready to move onto part 2.

 

Setting Up Your Phone

Step 1: Download the Dropbox mobile application for your smartphone platform (hopefully Android!) and log-in.

Step 2: Download Astro file manager and link it to your Dropbox account.

Step 3: Using Astro file explorer, navigate to the folder where your downloaded music is stored and use the “copy” function to copy the folders that you want uploaded to Google Music.

Step 4: In Astro, click the Dropbox icon, find your “Google Music from Phone” folder, open it, and paste your folders there. (What this does is upload your music files from your phone into the Dropbox folder on you computer, where Google Manager will find them and automatically upload them to your Google Music account!  Give it a few minutes and your music will all be stored on Google’s servers.)

Step 5: If you haven’t already, download the Google Music app, select your account, and enjoy streaming your new music from your phone! All done! Good job!

Hopefully Google will add this feature to their mobile apps in the future, but for now, you just hacked the system! Congratulations!

 

Disclaimer: This will work with Google Drive or any other like service as long as autosyncing is on.

Disclaimer 2: This method will also work with iOS, Windows, and BlackBerry smartphones and tablets

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Android Central’s most popular stories of 2012

Most popular stories of 2012

It's time for a quick look back at the year that was. Frankly, we don't remember most of it. Apparently a year ago or so we were in Las Vegas for CES. Then Barcelona for Mobile World Congress. Then London for the Samsung Galaxy S3. Then New Orleans for CTIA. And San Francisco for Google IO. And Seoul for the LG Optimus G. And San Diego for MobileCON. And any number of other singletons in between. So, yeah. It was a busy year.

After the break we've got a look at some of our most popular stories of 2012. Not necessarily the most important. Not necessarily our favorites. But in terms of page views (we now have to get a second set of hands to count those on, by the way), this is what you guys and gals — our dear readers — were peeping over the past 12 months. Of course, it's a little biased toward older stories, but there are some rather recent ones tucked away in there, too. Enjoy!

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Apps of the Week: BBC iPlayer, Bloons TD 5, Superbrothers: Sword & Sworcery EP and more!

Apps of the Week

It's Saturday, and that means it's time for the Android Central app picks. We've got another smattering of random apps, games and utilities for your enjoyment here this week. This is our last roundup of app picks for 2012, but fear not, we're coming back stronger than ever in 2013 with more apps for you to check out. See how we did wrapping up 2012 after the break.

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Samsung’s Galaxy S3 extended battery to become available Jan. 5, in Germany at least

Android Central

Before the holidays, an OEM extended battery kit surfaced for the Samsung Galaxy S3, initially going on pre-order at a British retailer. While that same retailer is still taking pre-orders for the item without an expected shipping date, Amazon Germany has gone one better. 

According to the item's listing on Amazon.de, the Samsung Extended Battery Kit will become available on January 5. Pricing is relatively consistent with earlier reports, coming in at €39.90, slightly cheaper even than the expected RRP of £40 (€48) in the UK. There is no word yet on if/when we can expect to see wider availability of this. 

Additionally, click on past the break for a quick video — in Slovenian, and you'll want to spin on to about 1:05 — which demonstrates the extended battery and replacement battery door. The best news? It doesn't seem to add much additional thickness to the phone. 

Source: Amazon via All About Samsung

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Press: Google Reader done right? Or just different?

Press

Press, a brand new Google Reader news client, has been the focus of the Android app community since its release, being heralded for its great design choices and general ease of use. It certainly isn't the first — nor will it be the last — in this arena, but right now its one that has everyone watching, and early indications are that it's living up to the hype.

Do the design and features offer enough of a draw to pull you away from another reading app of your choice? Stick around after the break and see if Press is worth your consideration.

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Press Google Reader client review

Press

Press, a brand new Google Reader news client, has been the focus of the Android app community since its release, being heralded for its great design choices and general ease of use. It certainly isn't the first — nor will it be the last — in this arena, but right now its one that has everyone watching, and early indications are that it's living up to the hype.

Do the design and features offer enough of a draw to pull you away from another reading app of your choice? Stick around after the break and see if Press is worth your consideration.

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Google Announces The 12 Best Apps Of 2012

 

As 2012 comes to an official close, Google decided to take some time and announce its picks for the best apps for 2012. While many of these have been outstanding apps for some time now, Google made its picks based off usability, functionality and most of all— the 12 apps’ contributions to more users adapting the platform. In addition, Google also touts the fact that these apps are available for users worldwide, not just out in pockets.

The full list of apps can be found below— many of them are staples among Android users while others… not so much. Regardless, here’s the full list after the break:

Zappos

Evernote

Pinterest

Snow White

Pocket

Expedia

Ancestry

Fancy

Mint.com

SeriesGuide

Pixlr Express

TED

 

source: Google’s 12 Best

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‘Leaked’ BlackBerry 10 info shows video chat and screen sharing in BBM, new task manager

'Leaked' BlackBerry 10 info shows video chat and screen sharing in BBM, new task manager

Top dog at RIM Thorsten Heins heavily implied that video chat would be added to BBM when BlackBerry 10 showed up, and now possible confirmation of the feature has come from what are thought to be leaked presentation slides. Originating on CrackBerry’s forums, the images have been taken down on various sites, leading us to believe they’re legit and that strongly worded requests have led to their removal. Not only do they suggest BBM video chat is coming to BB10, but also the ability to screen share during these video calls. Another slide details a new task manager for the OS called “BlackBerry Remember,” which can sync with Outlook and — based on its description and what was uncovered in the gold SDK — may include Evernote integration. We’ve contacted RIM for comment and will update you with any response, but until then, take a look at the slide above and the pair hidden after the break to assess for yourself whether they’re the real deal.

Update: Here’s RIM’s statement, which doesn’t really come as much of a surprise:

“We understand that there is a lot of excitement for BlackBerry 10. We will launch the platform on January 30th and until then we won’t comment on speculation.”

Continue reading ‘Leaked’ BlackBerry 10 info shows video chat and screen sharing in BBM, new task manager

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Via: All About Phones

Source: CrackBerry (1), (2)

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