Posts Tagged Chrome

‘Easy Unlock’ feature for Chrome OS leaks, could unlock a Chromebook with a nearby smartphone

easy_unlock_chrome_os_dev_leak

Chromebooks keep getting better and better. They are a great alternative to a full laptop if you are already connected to all of Google’s offerings. And now it looks like Chrome OS, the backbone for a Chromebook, is getting an expanded layer of security. The people over at Android Police found a feature titled Easy Unlock in the Chrome OS development channel. Easy Unlock would unlock a user’s Chromebook and smartphone are within a reasonable range from one another.

The feature is not yet ready to be fully used; however, the reason for that could be since an official application is going to be released.

Would you use Easy Unlock as a way to easily access a Chromebook?

Source: Android Police

Come comment on this article: ‘Easy Unlock’ feature for Chrome OS leaks, could unlock a Chromebook with a nearby smartphone

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Unfinished ‘Easy Unlock’ Feature Creeps Into Chrome OS Dev, Will Potentially Skip The Password Prompt If Your Phone Is Nearby

EasyUnlock-ThumbA new feature has snuck into the Chrome OS dev channel that, while not yet fully baked (okay, it’s still mostly a block of ice), could one day allow users to unlock their Chromebooks automatically just by having their phone in close proximity. This feature is “Easy Unlock.”

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The feature is disabled by default, but people running on the dev channel can enable it at chrome://flags/#enable-easy-unlock.

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After restarting, Chrome OS will toss up a notification with the option to enable the feature.

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Unfinished ‘Easy Unlock’ Feature Creeps Into Chrome OS Dev, Will Potentially Skip The Password Prompt If Your Phone Is Nearby was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Chrome Remote Desktop now available for Android

Accessing your desktop computer form anywhere just got a lot easier, as Chrome Remote Desktop has left the closed beta program and launched publicly. Currently available on the Play Store, CRD lets you access your computer from any Android device. It’s a neat workaround for remote access, and like Chrome — crosses platforms.


It works pretty simply — download the apps for Chrome and Android (via the Play Store and Chrome Web Store, links below), setting it up on the desktop first. A security code is given for authorization to access your computer, which must be referenced back to your mobile device. From there, it’s smooth sailing, and your Android device acts like a full-fledged remote access point for your computer.

We will caution that CRD asks that you allow some things you may not have been utilizing in the ability to allow devices to access your computer remotely. The Chrome Remote Desktop app for Chrome does a good job of walking you through it all, but keep in mind you may want/need to enable and disable features each time you wish to use it.

In toying with it early on, it definitely looks the part. We are able to use the same gestures as we would with a laptop trackpad, so it really looks as though Google has done their diligence with this one. For those looking to access a computer from the road, this might be the solution. We’ll be sure to bring you more news on this as it develops.

Source: Play Store, Chrome Web Store

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Chrome Remote Desktop for Android browses a PC or Mac from your phone

While we’d seen rumblings that it was in beta testing, Google’s Chrome Remote Desktop app for Android made its official debut today. This means that those who fancy Mountain View’s mobile OS can take a gander at files that reside on a Windows or Mac machine that’s safely docked in the office. The Remote Desktop app has been available on the desktop for quite some time, and now the same access is available through Chrome on Android smartphones and tablets. For those who prefer Apple’s devices, an iOS version of the software should be on the way soon.

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Source: Google Chrome Blog, Google Play

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Chrome Remote Desktop app exits beta, controls your computer on any ICS and above device

Just a couple of weeks after a full-fledged Chrome Remote Desktop app entered closed beta testing it has been opened up for all to use through the Play Store. The completely free app will let your Android device — assuming it’s running Android 4.0 or above — connect to and control any computer you have the Chrome Remote Desktop software installed on.

The client is simple, but mimics closely what you find doing computer-to-computer remote access with its existing Chrome and desktop clients. You can see all computers listed by the Google account they’re associated with, connect by entering a PIN and control your computer from anywhere. You simply swipe around on the screen to move the cursor, tap to click and tap and hold to drag for selections or to move windows. The app offers a full on-screen keyboard for text input and a one-tap ctrl-alt-del button for those controlling Windows machines.

The app has worked pretty smoothly on our Nexus 7, but it’s clear that you won’t be getting any super heavy work done on a small screen controlling a full desktop operating system. For those who need remote desktop in pinch though, Chrome Remote Desktop is one of the simplest ways to go now.



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Chrome Remote Desktop Now Available For Android Devices

Have you ever been in a situation where you are outside your house and all of a sudden you needed a file stored in your home desktop? Instead of returning home and getting the file you could get it remotely if you have an app like TeamViewer installed in your desktop. Another good option is to use Google’s recently released Chrome Remote Desktop app for Android devices.

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If you mainly use the Chrome browser on your desktop then you can further enhance its features by getting the Chrome Remote Desktop from the Chrome Web Store. This allows you to remotely access your desktop using another computer or in this case, an Android device.

  • Go to the Chrome Web Store and search for the Chrome Remote Desktop app
  • Click on Add to Chrome to install the app
  • When a confirmation appears just click on Add

As soon as the app has been added a new tab will appear in the Apps section. If this is the first time that you will be using the app you will have to authorize the permissions that it needs which include

  • See your email
  • See your Chrome Remote Desktop computers
  • Receive and send chat messages
  • Perform these actions when you are not in front of the computer

You will also need top setup s PIN of at least 6 digits which will later be used to gain remote access to your desktop.

Once everything has been setup on the desktop side you can proceed to get the free Chrome Remote Desktop over at the Google Play store for your Android device. The app requires a device running on at least Android 4.0 and has a weight of 2.1MB.

Setting up the app on your mobile device is easy and once it is up and running you only need to enter the previously assigned PIN to gain access to your desktop.

In terms of performance, the remote connection went smoothly over a Wi-Fi connection as well as over a mobile data network.

For those concerned about the security of their data here is Google’s privacy policy

  • We encrypt many of our services using SSL.
  • We offer you two step verification when you access your Google Account, and a Safe Browsing feature in Google Chrome.
  • We review our information collection, storage and processing practices, including physical security measures, to guard against unauthorized access to systems.
  • We restrict access to personal information to Google employees, contractors and agents who need to know that information in order to process it for us, and who are subject to strict contractual confidentiality obligations and may be disciplined or terminated if they fail to meet these obligations.

via google play

The post Chrome Remote Desktop Now Available For Android Devices appeared first on The Droid Guy.

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Chrome Remote Desktop App Now Available on Google Play

Chrome Remote Desktop App Now Available on Google Play

Google’s Chrome Remote Desktop is now out of beta, available for all on Google Play to download. The app and Chrome extension allows users to securely access their computers via an Android device, much like other third party software that has been available for years. 

Once a remote client is set up on your computer, and is online, all you will need to do is open the Remote app on your Android device, then you will have full control over the desktop.

The app is completely free, but does require an Android device running Android 4.0 and up.

Go grab both apps and get to it.

Play Link | Chrome Web Store Link

Chrome Remote Desktop App Now Available on Google Play is a post from: Droid Life

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Google Releases Chromoting App For Accessing Computers Remotely From Android Devices

imageGoogle is simply on a roll today! As it turns out, the stock camera app wasn’t the only new app to hit the Play Store today – we now have the Chromoting app as well. Chromoting, for those unfamiliar with it, is a way to securely access your computer remotely by connecting to Chrome running a special Chrome Remote Desktop app. Anyone familiar with Remote Desktop, VNC, and other similar apps should feel instantly at home with Chromoting.

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Google Releases Chromoting App For Accessing Computers Remotely From Android Devices was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Office Online arrives in the Chrome Web Store

Microsoft has made Office Online available on the Google Chrome Web Store. While Office Online has always worked in Chrome, Chrome users install Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote Online in the Chrome App Launcher. Office Online will go head-to-head with Google’s productivity apps right in Google’s own store.



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Chrome Beta 35 for Android Update Brings in Chromecast Video Support

Chrome Beta for AndroidChrome Beta 35 became available yesterday for desktop PC users and brought a heck of a lot with it. It is full of more developer control over touch input, new javascript features and unprefixed Shadow DOM. Basically a lot of great stuff for those that know what is going on, for the average user, you are better off with sticking to the regular Chrome browser build. Following up with the Chrome Beta 35 build release is a new update for Chrome Beta for Android.

Chrome Beta for Android is the app where Google gives you a sneak peak at features they are working on for the standard Chrome for Android app. Sometimes they work, sometimes they fail and other times they eat your neighbors dog. (Which might not always be a bad thing.) Needless to say, the Chrome Beta for Android is one you might want to install along side the traditional app for experimenting purposes.

In today’s update there are the usual stability and performance fixes to make it faster and more stable. It also has an “Undo Tab Close” which will let you restore and accidentally closed tab. I know you have done it, I certainly have. You will also find fullscreen video with subtitles and HTML5 controls, support for some multi-window devices (Samsung primarily) and, probably the most notable change, support to directly cast some videos to your Chromecast.

If you want to poe around the new build then head into the Play Store and pick it up. Just click the “Get it on Google Play” button below.


Get it on Google Play

Source: Google Blogspot

Via: 9to5Google


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Chrome Beta update lets you ‘undo’ a closed tab, adds support for some multi-window devices

Quickly re-open that tab you accidentally closed while reading

Those of you on the beta track of Chrome on Android will be receiving an update today with a small, but useful, set of features. First up is the ability to “undo” an accidental tab closure — something that we’re all used to being able to do on desktop browsers. Next is improvements to the video player, letting your phone or tablet make use of HTML5 full-screen video with subtitles and on-screen playback controls.

The update also includes support for the multi-window features on some devices (although which ones aren’t specified), as well as support for sending some videos from the browser to Chromecast directly. The update is now available from the Play Store at the link above, so long as you’re okay with moving over to the beta channel of the browser.

Source: Google Chrome Releases



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Chrome For Android Beta Version 35 Adds Undo Tab Close, Better Fullscreen Video, And Samsung Multi-Window Support

unnamedTime keeps marching forward, and Google keeps improving the mobile version of its Chrome browser. Those who want to see the new goodies before everyone else can check out the official Chrome for Android Beta, which updates to version 35 today. The official changelog mentions some interesting additions, including at least one that was there already: support for Chromecast on HTML5 videos.

Screenshot_2014-04-10-16-27-07 Screenshot_2014-04-10-16-27-49

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Videos on your device have gotten better too, with better HTML5 controls and subtitle support (for those clips that include them).

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Chrome For Android Beta Version 35 Adds Undo Tab Close, Better Fullscreen Video, And Samsung Multi-Window Support was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Newest Chrome Beta update lets you undo closed tabs, adds Chromecast support

Chrome Beta update

Google is pushing out an update to Chrome Beta for those of us living on the bleeding edge. The update adds a handful of extremely handy features, namely, the ability to undo closed tabs. It works similar to Gmail and the like, with a little popup asking if you’d like to undo your action.

The update also adds support for “multi-window” devices, as well as new video features including full screen video with subtitles and HTML5 controls, and the ability to ‘cast some videos to your Chromecast. Oddly enough, YouTube video casting isn’t available quite yet, but then again, there’s always the app for that.

If you want to give Chrome Beta a shot, you can download it free from the Google Play store via the link below.

Download on Google Play: Chrome Beta

Thanks, Wade!

[Chrome Releases]

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Chrome Beta Version 35 Brings New Features, Tab Closing Undo and Chromecast Video Support

Chrome Beta Version 35 Brings New Features, Tab Closing Undo and Chromecast Video Support

In a move which breaks Google’s usual Wednesday update ritual, we are seeing an update this afternoon to the Chrome Beta app with a couple of feature enhancements.

The first feature on the changelog is the ability to undo closing a tab, which may be quite the addition for a few users out there. We also have support for fullscreen video with Subtitles and HTML5 controls, the ability to use Chrome with “some multi-window devices,” and support for casting “some” videos with Chromecast. Most certainly another notch in the HDMI dongle’s belt. 

The upgrades are not quite ready for the non-beta app yet, as a few features are incomplete. YouTube Casting is not yet fully complete through the browser, and neither are fullscreen video controls.

The update is rolling out over the next few hours on Google Play, but we have an APK file available for you to sideload down below.

Play Link | Download

Via: Chrome Releases Blog

Chrome Beta Version 35 Brings New Features, Tab Closing Undo and Chromecast Video Support is a post from: Droid Life

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Chrome OS Dev update recognizes tethered devices

When tethering your WiFi capable devices to an Android smartphone, it’s usually to check email or other quick work. The last thing you want is for cumbersome tasks to draw you into a long tethering session, but Chromebooks sometimes do. With the latest Chrome OS Dev Channel update, though, that could change.


The latest Chrome OS update now identifies that the Chromebook you’re using has attached itself to a network that is using cellular data. Recognizing that you’re just trying to see a cat meme (or, you know, whatever you need to do urgently), your Chromebook won’t perform things like checking for updates. The device has been treating all networks equally, but this update changes that.

It’s a great little tweak from the Chrome team, too. With unlimited data slowly going the way of the dinosaur, we don’t really want to spend bandwidth searching for non-crucial updates. Chrome OS now recognizes the difference in networks, and will let you do what you need to do without getting in the way. Subtly brilliant, really.

When you find yourself on a proper WiFi network, your Chromebook will also recognize that, and perform those back-end services it needs to to keep you up to date. This is a nice addition for travellers who like to tether, but users are already calling for a toggle to this. It’s only in Dev channel, so it will take some time to reach most Chromebook users. We hope users get what they need by then.

Source: Chromium Review

Via: Francois Beaufort

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Chrome Remote Desktop hits invite-only beta

chrome remote desktop

Google’s Chrome Remote Desktop app has taken one step closer to an official release today, with an invite-only beta going live in the Play Store. Unfortunately, that means you probably won’t be able to test it out, but considering Google publicly releases a ton of products with beta tags, this might be widely available sooner than you think.

The app appears to work pretty similarly to most other remote desktop clients. You install the Chrome extension on your PC, then install the Android app from the Play Store, then sign into your Google account to start a connection. Pretty simple, for better or worse.

There’s no shortage of remote desktop apps available for Android, but a (free) Google option might convert a few users.

source: Droid Life

Come comment on this article: Chrome Remote Desktop hits invite-only beta

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Chrome for Android will translate the web into emoji

Lest you think you’d have to wait for April 1st for all of Google’s April Fools’ Day jocularity, there’s more to be had tonight: try translate to emoji in Chrome on for size. That’s what Google has in store for Chrome on Android, but they very cleverly intended it be saved for the day itself — the hidden feature doesn’t activate until the date and time matches that of April 1st. But you can trick it by manually skipping your date forward to April 1st, when a tap on the overflow menu will offer you the Translate to Emoji (with a little yellow dude on a surfboard). [Android Police]

    



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[What Does That Say?] Google Translates Text In Chrome To Emoji For April Fools’ Day

Chrome-ThumbGoogle does its part to celebrate the major US holidays, not to mention quite a few others, but April Fools’ Day appears to be its favorite. The company goes all out every year, and it’s already looking like 2014 may just be its very best effort yet. In addition to scattering Pokemon all over Maps, Google is now dispersing emoji all throughout Chrome.

The feature is optional, but once enabled, Chrome will replace certain words with emoji.

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[What Does That Say?] Google Translates Text In Chrome To Emoji For April Fools’ Day was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

    

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Chrome Beta For Android Comes With Mysterious New Contextual Search Feature

unnamedGoogle sometimes gives us a hint of what it’s working on if you’re willing to dig for it. Buried in the new Chrome Beta for Android update is something called contextual search. It’s not completely functional right now, but you can take a peek at some aspects of it.

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To enable contextual search in Chrome Beta, go to chrome://flags/#contextual-search in the address bar. Tap enable to activate this feature, then restart the browser using the button that pops up.

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Chrome Beta For Android Comes With Mysterious New Contextual Search Feature was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

    

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New Google Play Music update brings the ability to upload audio files directly via Chrome

Play Music

Google has brought a significant update to Play Music which now allows users to add music files directly through the Chrome browser. This essentially means that you can drag and drop audio files directly from your computer onto the Play Music account via Chrome.

Google claims this feature is from its beta labs, so it requires users to enable the feature manually (link below). But barring that, it should function quite smoothly without much trouble. The update also brings a mini music player right within your browser along with the ability to download music files directly. The addition of this new feature means that Google’s Music Manager app is no longer required for users to upload files to their Play Music account. This update makes uploading music an easier process for users of the Google Chromebook.

Users can also set Google Play Music to upload music automatically whenever they add audio files to a selected folder on the computer. The addition of these features is certainly a step in the right direction from Google and will make lives much easier for subscribers.

Google Play Music

Source: Google Play Music Labs, Google+

Via: Talk Android

The post New Google Play Music update brings the ability to upload audio files directly via Chrome appeared first on The Droid Guy.

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Updated LastPass app now autofills passwords in Android apps and mobile Chrome browsers

LastPass

LastPass, a fantastic password manager, has updated their Android application to create a much better experience across the Android OS. The new app will now autofill passwords in on your mobile applications, as well as the mobile Chrome browser. Autofilling passwords are already handled by Chrome, but if you use LastPass, you already know that it’s a slightly more secure, easier to manage option.

The biggest advantage now is the autofill option in applications. As long as you’re on Android 4.1 and up, whenever you open an app that has a username and password field, a pop up will appear that will let LastPass fill in your information. Since very few apps offer the ability to save passwords, this will definitely save you a lot of typing.

You can find the updated LastPass app below. The app is a 14 day trial, and you’ll have to subscribe to a LastPass premium service ($12 a year) to continue using it after the trial.

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Play Store Download Link

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LastPass Updated To Version 3.2 With Automatic Password Entry For Apps And Chrome Browser

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Few -if any- password managers have gained a following quite like LastPass. It’s secure, extensively cross-platform, and easy to use. When up-and-coming competitor PasswordBox hit the scene last month with the ability to insert login credentials directly into native apps, it left many LastPass users anxiously requesting the same feature. The wait is finally over as LastPass for Android has been updated to enable automatic fill-in for apps and Chrome.

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LastPass blocks screenshots within the app, thus the photos

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Like PasswordBox, LastPass is using the Accessibility Services API in Android to enable automatic fill-in.

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LastPass Updated To Version 3.2 With Automatic Password Entry For Apps And Chrome Browser was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

    

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Google releases a Photowall app experiment for Chrome and Android

Google has a neat Chromecast application to show off today. Photowall lets you and your friends get together and display images right on your television.

You can create a Photowall using your Android phone or tablet, or from your laptop using the Photowall Google Chrome Experiment page. Everyone sends photos to the big screen, and when you’re finished the application automatically generates a video and drops it on YouTube so you can share it with friends who weren’t around to help make it.

    



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Google Now rolling out to Chrome desktop users

We’ve seen Google Now for Chrome on the desktop for folks using beta builds, but starting today it’s pushing out to all users. You won’t need to fiddle with any settings or flags or do any sort of wizardry, but you will need to be on the latest version of Chrome — which you should be anyway for security reasons. Once Google Now for Chrome is available for you, you use it just like you would on the phone, with reminders and cards in your tray, and voice commands through the Google website. For more information, see this Google help topic page.

    



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Google Now Is Rolling Out To Chrome Stable Channel On The Desktop

Chrome logo with white backgroundAndroid users have been enjoying Google Now for nearly two years, but Google’s algorithmically generated info cards are finally reaching the desktop. After showing up in the developer and beta channels, Google Now is rolling out to Chrome stable beginning today.

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Google Now on the desktop contains a subset of the cards you’d see on Android including package shipping status, weather, and directions to frequent destinations. The Chrome notification icon will sit in your Windows system tray or the OS X menu bar.

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Google Now Is Rolling Out To Chrome Stable Channel On The Desktop was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

    

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Google Now arrives on Windows and Mac OSX via Chrome web browser

Google Now Chrome screenshot

If you’ve got a computer with the Chrome desktop browser installed — good news! Starting today, you’ll now have the power of Google Now at your disposal. Google announced the good news on their Google+ page, and says the update will be pushing out to Chrome browsers over the next few weeks (so don’t freak out if you don’t have it yet).

Because this relies on both the Chrome web browser and your Android/iOS device, you should make sure both are signed into the same Google accounts to reap the benefits. Once done, you’ll have Google Now cards displaying on the side of the Google homepage, showing you everything from weather, sports scores, traffic commute times, and event reminders — all on your Windows or Mac computers. Cheers!

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Users will get access to Google Now notifications from the desktop version of Chrome

Chrome Google Now

Google is bringing an update to the desktop version of the Chrome browser with the ability to view Google Now notifications. This means that you can track current events, check the weather or see which of your favorite sports teams are playing right within your browser on the computer.

The update is rolling out gradually and could take a while to reach the entirety of the Chrome users, but Google assures that it’s on its way. Users will not have to do anything out of the ordinary after the update as everything takes care of itself once it goes live.

The browser will provide details based on the Google account you’ve used to sign into Chrome. Like you can see from the screenshot above, it won’t be too flashy or come in the way of your existing tabs. It will merely be a dropdown menu which can be seen at any convenient time.

This is a nifty addition to millions of Chrome users around the world who also rely on Google Now for information on current events and several other important data.

Source: +Chrome – Google Plus

Via: Android Guys

The post Users will get access to Google Now notifications from the desktop version of Chrome appeared first on The Droid Guy.

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[Nifty] Phandroid News Chrome extension now available

phandroid-featured-LARGE

Seeing as Chrome is the most popular web browser in the world, there’s a good chance that many Phandroid readers spend a good part of their day inside a Chrome tab or two. Just in case you didn’t have enough ways to get your Android news fix from us over here at Phandroid throughout the day, we’ve come up with a nifty Chrome Extension to let you when we’ve got words that need to be read, making your life that much easier.

Phandroid-Chrome-Extension

It’s quick and easy to install. Just head on over to the Chrome Web Store and add our Chrome extension to your Chrome Web Browser or Chromebook. When there’s Android news to be read, you’ll know thanks to Chrome’s pop-up or toast notification system and you’ll also see a nifty red number on the Phandroid logo beside your address bar. Just click the Phandroid logo to view the latest news headlines in a drop down cards UI format. You can mark all news as read if you’ve already read them say via the Phandroid News app or click on a link to get your news fix in another tab. You can also configure the time interval for checking for new articles as well as the amount of desktop notifications to appear at once.

Phandroid Chrome Extension Options

A special thanks to Steve for all of his hard work. Don’t forget to rate and review this extension on the Chrome Web Store. Your feedback helps. Thanks!

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Artist Works With Google To Create Interactive Sculpture Painted By Chrome Users

Sculpture-ThumbArtist Janet Echelman builds giant, living sculptures that respond to the elements around them. Typically, these giant works of art sway in the wind, flow with the water, or respond to light. This time, Echelman’s work is interacting with Chrome. Her piece, built in collaboration with Google Creative Director Aaron Koblin, now descends over water and walkways from a Vancouver skyscraper, changing color in response to the input it receives from visitors on the ground.

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Artist Works With Google To Create Interactive Sculpture Painted By Chrome Users was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

    

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Chrome update fixes audio bug that plagued the HTC One

A quick heads up, folks, that the Chrome browser for Android has gotten an update today. The changelog is vague in the usual ways, noting “stability and security updates.” But for those who are using an HTC One, you’ll need to download this new version right away, as it fixes a pretty annoying audio bug that would cause the phone to launch straight into speakerphone mode when placing a call — damned near deafening, thanks to that Boomsound thing.

    



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