Posts Tagged collection

Sleevenote – The Music Player with Sleeves – for iPhone and iPad

Sleevenote  
Developer: Device and Application ltd  
Price: $4.99   Download

Device and Application introduces Sleevenote 1.0 for iOS. Sleevenote allows users to flick through their collection and flip over releases to view and play tracks, recalling the physicality of browsing through vinyl and CD collections. Utilising the gesture capability of iOS devices, the app allows album artwork to take centre stage without extraneous clutter.

Sleevenote gives iPhone, iPad and iPod touch users an intuitive and tactile way to interact with their music, creating ‘sleeves’ by faithfully attaching an interactive track listing to the reverse side of an album’s cover.

Key Features:
* Syncs with your music and artwork in iTunes
* Unique colour-matched album ‘sleeves’ created for your music collection
* Flick through your collection and flip over sleeves to view and play tracks by tapping a song
* Instantly browse by Artist or Album, using the A-Z sliders, revealed with a tap or swipe in the upper or lower areas
* Pinch for grid view for a quickly browsable overview
* Double-tap a sleeve to play, press and hold any sleeve for Now Playing
* Tap a cover for the standard music player controls
* Airplay enabled
* iTunes Match compatible, show or hide cloud tracks
* Filter your collection using the “Sleevenote playlist” setting

Sleevenote 1.0 is $4.99 USD (or equivalent amount in other currencies) and available worldwide exclusively through the App Store in the Music category.

“Sleevenote – The Music Player with Sleeves – for iPhone and iPad” originally appeared on AppCraver.com.

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Personalize your device with DecalSkin’s removable art Work

I was on a mission to find some new or super amazing looking wallpapers for everyone to see and have when I came across DecalSkin. They might be old news to some of you, but they are certainly new to us. We have seen SkinIt in the past and DecalSkin seems to be along the same lines. They offer an enormous collection of pre designed decals that you place on your device. They cover the front and rear of your device.

The decals are ultra thin and they say near weightless. Each decal is printed on UV-resistant material that helps protect your device from surface scratches. They are bubble-free to apply and release from your device easily. Where they take it up a small notch, is they offer a free matching wallpaper for DecalSkin you purchase. As you can see in a few images below, it really gives your device the complete look.

Decalskin Decalskin Galaxy S III 2The list of devices that you can get a decal for is huge. Covering pretty much any device that is out there. Including eReaders, tablets, gaming devices, laptops and more.  Equally as huge is the various collections to choose from. You can browse by artist, color scheme, device or collection. I could spend hours in here looking through them and not seem them all. DecalSkin is worth a look if you want to give your device just that little extra special customization.

As far as prices are concerned, All the Galaxy S III skins I looked at were on sale for $8.99 each. So where the skins for the Samsung Galaxy Note II and HTC One X. Where as the Asus EEE Pad Transformer TF 101 was $14.99. We image the prices are pretty similar across the boards with phones being $9 each and tablets being $15.

Feel free to head over to DecalSkin.com and take a little time to look around. You might find one that you just can’t NOT have on your device. Heck, grab matching ones for your phone, tablet, laptop and XBox.

 

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Gameplay Videos To Satisfy Your OUYA Curiosity

OUYA, the Android gaming console, is a relatively low-budget, yet intriguing approach to console gaming. In the minds of many in the Android community, it’s been high on promise but low on substance. Fortunately, we’re starting to see examples of actual gameplay on the device. The gaming site, Game Fans has put together a collection of videos showing some classics on the OUYA.

Checkout the N64 emulator, Street Fighter 2 Torbo and Sonic 4 on the OUYA. Hit the source for more videos.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Source: Game Fans
Via: Phandroid

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Gameplay Videos To Satisfy Your OUYA Curiosity

OUYA, the Android gaming console, is a relatively low-budget, yet intriguing approach to console gaming. In the minds of many in the Android community, it’s been high on promise but low on substance. Fortunately, we’re starting to see examples of actual gameplay on the device. The gaming site, Game Fans has put together a collection of videos showing some classics on the OUYA.

Checkout the N64 emulator, Street Fighter 2 Torbo and Sonic 4 on the OUYA. Hit the source for more videos.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Source: Game Fans
Via: Phandroid

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No Comments

Gameplay Videos To Satisfy Your OUYA Curiosity

OUYA, the Android gaming console, is a relatively low-budget, yet intriguing approach to console gaming. In the minds of many in the Android community, it’s been high on promise but low on substance. Fortunately, we’re starting to see examples of actual gameplay on the device. The gaming site, Game Fans has put together a collection of videos showing some classics on the OUYA.

Checkout the N64 emulator, Street Fighter 2 Torbo and Sonic 4 on the OUYA. Hit the source for more videos.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Source: Game Fans
Via: Phandroid

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SuperTooth Showcases New Bluetooth Gear at CES 2013 – DISCO TWIN and HD-VOICE

logo

SuperTooth Showcases New Bluetooth Gear at CES 2013 –
DISCO TWIN and HD-VOICE

Entire SuperTooth collection of audio & car kit accessories on display
at CES 2013 in South Hall 3, Booth # 30769 (January 8th-11th)
and at ShowStoppers Table # B19 (January 8th) at the Wynn Hotel

Las Vegas – January 7, 2013 – SuperTooth, Bluetooth expert and world’s leading in-car speakerphone brand, will showcase its industry-leading line of Bluetooth accessories – speakers, hands-free car kits and recently launched headphone line – at South Hall 3, Booth # 30769 at CES. Set to debut are the DISCO TWIN – stereo speakers sold in pairs and HD-VOICE – an in-car speakerphone able to speak in 12 languages.

“SuperTooth’s acute understanding of the Bluetooth space positions us to roll out the best technology at the most affordable price,” said Yves Le Reun, Vice President of Sales & Marketing. “Our products are designed to provide the best quality, most power and overall greatest value within their respective price points. This is why SuperTooth has built such a loyal following over the years, growing to 45% market share worldwide in the Bluetooth speakerphone space.”

The DISCO TWIN will debut at CES, priced at $199 for a set of two. The DISCO TWIN are a pair of portable, rechargeable speakers featuring true right / left stereo, each unit equipped with 16 watts RMS audio power, double speakers in front and a high efficiency bass reflex system in back, pairing together for a combined 32 watts of pure sound. Music can be streamed wirelessly from any Bluetooth-enabled device to the DISCO TWIN; users simply pair their Bluetooth device to both speakers, and Bluetooth stereo technology will channel audio to each. The integrated rechargeable batteries ensure 3-4 hours of non-stop, maximum-volume music or up to 10 hours of moderately played tunes. Watch the DISCO TWIN video

HD-VOICE, also debuting at CES priced at $89, is a Bluetooth hands-free car kit with instant installation – just clip
it to the sun visor in the car, pair it with any Bluetooth-enabled mobile phone and begin making hands-free calls in
any type of vehicle. The novelty of the HD-VOICE is its ability to verbalize pairing instructions and announce callers
in 12 languages, as well as its robust audio power – two speakers and two microphones for outstanding sound
quality, both in emission and reception. For incoming calls, the HD-VOICE announces the name of the caller and
users say ‘OK’ to pick up the call. The HD-VOICE also speaks aloud the battery level, connection status and GPS
instructions in 12 languages.

Also on display at the booth will be the entire SuperTooth collection of speakers (DISCO TWIN, Disco2 and Disco),
hands-free car kits (HD-VOICE, Crystal and HD), and recently introduced Melody headphone.
Visit the SuperTooth booth at South Hall 3, Booth # 30769 at the Las Vegas Convention Center and at ShowStoppers Table # B19 at the Wynn Hotel, Lafite Ballroom, 3131 South Las Vegas Boulevard.

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How to upload songs to Google Music from your smartphone or tablet using Dropbox

Google Music (now officially known as Play Music) is an incredible product. Google allows you to upload your personal music collection to their servers and stream it from your web browser or any Android device absolutely free! The only bummer is that Google has overlooked an important feature: the ability to upload music purchased outside of the Google Play Store to your Google Music account from your smartphone. Naturally, Google is trying to push users to purchase their music from Google Play, but what if you want to buy your music from the Amazon MP3 store, or download it using some other quasi-legal method (shame, shame).

If your looking to upload music from your Android device, (or even your non-Android device…gasp!), you’ve come to the right place. Jump past the break to learn how!

 

You will need a computer of any kind for this workaround to function properly. Got one? Good! We’ll break up our guide into two parts: Part 1: Setting Up Your Computer, and Part 2: Setting Up Your Phone

 

Setting Up Your Computer

Step 1: If you don’t already have it, download and install Dropbox on your computer (this will entail creating a free account, and they will give you 2GB of free storage for life).

Step 2: Once Dropbox is installed, create a folder within Dropbox called “Google Music from Phone” or something that will make it easy to identify later.

Step 3: Once you’ve got your folder created inside Dropbox, use your web browser to navigate to Google Music. If you don’t already have a Google Music account set up, do that now (it’s free).

Step 4: In the upper right hand corner of your Google Music page, click “Upload Music”. This will prompt you to download Google’s “Music Manager”.

Step 5: Once the download completes, double click the file and let it install on your computer. After it’s installed, it’ll ask you to log in using your Google account. Do that, and then select “upload songs to Google Play”.

Step 6: It’ll ask you where you keep your music collection. Select “other folders” (it’s the last option), then “add folder”. When the window pops up, navigate to your newly created “Google Music from Phone” folder (that should be in your Dropbox) and select it. Click next.

Step 7: This is very important! After you select your “Google Music from Phone” folder as the place that you want Google Music to upload from, the Google Music Manager will ask you: “Do you want to automatically upload songs that you add to your selected folders in the future?” YOU MUST CLICK YES!

Ok, your computer is set up and we’re ready to move onto part 2.

 

Setting Up Your Phone

Step 1: Download the Dropbox mobile application for your smartphone platform (hopefully Android!) and log-in.

Step 2: Download Astro file manager and link it to your Dropbox account.

Step 3: Using Astro file explorer, navigate to the folder where your downloaded music is stored and use the “copy” function to copy the folders that you want uploaded to Google Music.

Step 4: In Astro, click the Dropbox icon, find your “Google Music from Phone” folder, open it, and paste your folders there. (What this does is upload your music files from your phone into the Dropbox folder on you computer, where Google Manager will find them and automatically upload them to your Google Music account!  Give it a few minutes and your music will all be stored on Google’s servers.)

Step 5: If you haven’t already, download the Google Music app, select your account, and enjoy streaming your new music from your phone! All done! Good job!

Hopefully Google will add this feature to their mobile apps in the future, but for now, you just hacked the system! Congratulations!

 

Disclaimer: This will work with Google Drive or any other like service as long as autosyncing is on.

Disclaimer 2: This method will also work with iOS, Windows, and BlackBerry smartphones and tablets

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No Comments

How to upload songs to Google Music from your smartphone or tablet using Dropbox

Google Music (now officially known as Play Music) is an incredible product. Google allows you to upload your personal music collection to their servers and stream it from your web browser or any Android device absolutely free! The only bummer is that Google has overlooked an important feature: the ability to upload music purchased outside of the Google Play Store to your Google Music account from your smartphone. Naturally, Google is trying to push users to purchase their music from Google Play, but what if you want to buy your music from the Amazon MP3 store, or download it using some other quasi-legal method (shame, shame).

If your looking to upload music from your Android device, (or even your non-Android device…gasp!), you’ve come to the right place. Jump past the break to learn how!

 

You will need a computer of any kind for this workaround to function properly. Got one? Good! We’ll break up our guide into two parts: Part 1: Setting Up Your Computer, and Part 2: Setting Up Your Phone

 

Setting Up Your Computer

Step 1: If you don’t already have it, download and install Dropbox on your computer (this will entail creating a free account, and they will give you 2GB of free storage for life).

Step 2: Once Dropbox is installed, create a folder within Dropbox called “Google Music from Phone” or something that will make it easy to identify later.

Step 3: Once you’ve got your folder created inside Dropbox, use your web browser to navigate to Google Music. If you don’t already have a Google Music account set up, do that now (it’s free).

Step 4: In the upper right hand corner of your Google Music page, click “Upload Music”. This will prompt you to download Google’s “Music Manager”.

Step 5: Once the download completes, double click the file and let it install on your computer. After it’s installed, it’ll ask you to log in using your Google account. Do that, and then select “upload songs to Google Play”.

Step 6: It’ll ask you where you keep your music collection. Select “other folders” (it’s the last option), then “add folder”. When the window pops up, navigate to your newly created “Google Music from Phone” folder (that should be in your Dropbox) and select it. Click next.

Step 7: This is very important! After you select your “Google Music from Phone” folder as the place that you want Google Music to upload from, the Google Music Manager will ask you: “Do you want to automatically upload songs that you add to your selected folders in the future?” YOU MUST CLICK YES!

Ok, your computer is set up and we’re ready to move onto part 2.

 

Setting Up Your Phone

Step 1: Download the Dropbox mobile application for your smartphone platform (hopefully Android!) and log-in.

Step 2: Download Astro file manager and link it to your Dropbox account.

Step 3: Using Astro file explorer, navigate to the folder where your downloaded music is stored and use the “copy” function to copy the folders that you want uploaded to Google Music.

Step 4: In Astro, click the Dropbox icon, find your “Google Music from Phone” folder, open it, and paste your folders there. (What this does is upload your music files from your phone into the Dropbox folder on you computer, where Google Manager will find them and automatically upload them to your Google Music account!  Give it a few minutes and your music will all be stored on Google’s servers.)

Step 5: If you haven’t already, download the Google Music app, select your account, and enjoy streaming your new music from your phone! All done! Good job!

Hopefully Google will add this feature to their mobile apps in the future, but for now, you just hacked the system! Congratulations!

 

Disclaimer: This will work with Google Drive or any other like service as long as autosyncing is on.

Disclaimer 2: This method will also work with iOS, Windows, and BlackBerry smartphones and tablets

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No Comments

How to upload songs to Google Music from your smartphone or tablet using Dropbox

Google Music (now officially known as Play Music) is an incredible product. Google allows you to upload your personal music collection to their servers and stream it from your web browser or any Android device absolutely free! The only bummer is that Google has overlooked an important feature: the ability to upload music purchased outside of the Google Play Store to your Google Music account from your smartphone. Naturally, Google is trying to push users to purchase their music from Google Play, but what if you want to buy your music from the Amazon MP3 store, or download it using some other quasi-legal method (shame, shame).

If your looking to upload music from your Android device, (or even your non-Android device…gasp!), you’ve come to the right place. Jump past the break to learn how!

 

You will need a computer of any kind for this workaround to function properly. Got one? Good! We’ll break up our guide into two parts: Part 1: Setting Up Your Computer, and Part 2: Setting Up Your Phone

 

Setting Up Your Computer

Step 1: If you don’t already have it, download and install Dropbox on your computer (this will entail creating a free account, and they will give you 2GB of free storage for life).

Step 2: Once Dropbox is installed, create a folder within Dropbox called “Google Music from Phone” or something that will make it easy to identify later.

Step 3: Once you’ve got your folder created inside Dropbox, use your web browser to navigate to Google Music. If you don’t already have a Google Music account set up, do that now (it’s free).

Step 4: In the upper right hand corner of your Google Music page, click “Upload Music”. This will prompt you to download Google’s “Music Manager”.

Step 5: Once the download completes, double click the file and let it install on your computer. After it’s installed, it’ll ask you to log in using your Google account. Do that, and then select “upload songs to Google Play”.

Step 6: It’ll ask you where you keep your music collection. Select “other folders” (it’s the last option), then “add folder”. When the window pops up, navigate to your newly created “Google Music from Phone” folder (that should be in your Dropbox) and select it. Click next.

Step 7: This is very important! After you select your “Google Music from Phone” folder as the place that you want Google Music to upload from, the Google Music Manager will ask you: “Do you want to automatically upload songs that you add to your selected folders in the future?” YOU MUST CLICK YES!

Ok, your computer is set up and we’re ready to move onto part 2.

 

Setting Up Your Phone

Step 1: Download the Dropbox mobile application for your smartphone platform (hopefully Android!) and log-in.

Step 2: Download Astro file manager and link it to your Dropbox account.

Step 3: Using Astro file explorer, navigate to the folder where your downloaded music is stored and use the “copy” function to copy the folders that you want uploaded to Google Music.

Step 4: In Astro, click the Dropbox icon, find your “Google Music from Phone” folder, open it, and paste your folders there. (What this does is upload your music files from your phone into the Dropbox folder on you computer, where Google Manager will find them and automatically upload them to your Google Music account!  Give it a few minutes and your music will all be stored on Google’s servers.)

Step 5: If you haven’t already, download the Google Music app, select your account, and enjoy streaming your new music from your phone! All done! Good job!

Hopefully Google will add this feature to their mobile apps in the future, but for now, you just hacked the system! Congratulations!

 

Disclaimer: This will work with Google Drive or any other like service as long as autosyncing is on.

Disclaimer 2: This method will also work with iOS, Windows, and BlackBerry smartphones and tablets

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No Comments

How to upload songs to Google Music from your smartphone or tablet using Dropbox

Google Music (now officially known as Play Music) is an incredible product. Google allows you to upload your personal music collection to their servers and stream it from your web browser or any Android device absolutely free! The only bummer is that Google has overlooked an important feature: the ability to upload music purchased outside of the Google Play Store to your Google Music account from your smartphone. Naturally, Google is trying to push users to purchase their music from Google Play, but what if you want to buy your music from the Amazon MP3 store, or download it using some other quasi-legal method (shame, shame).

If your looking to upload music from your Android device, (or even your non-Android device…gasp!), you’ve come to the right place. Jump past the break to learn how!

 

You will need a computer of any kind for this workaround to function properly. Got one? Good! We’ll break up our guide into two parts: Part 1: Setting Up Your Computer, and Part 2: Setting Up Your Phone

 

Setting Up Your Computer

Step 1: If you don’t already have it, download and install Dropbox on your computer (this will entail creating a free account, and they will give you 2GB of free storage for life).

Step 2: Once Dropbox is installed, create a folder within Dropbox called “Google Music from Phone” or something that will make it easy to identify later.

Step 3: Once you’ve got your folder created inside Dropbox, use your web browser to navigate to Google Music. If you don’t already have a Google Music account set up, do that now (it’s free).

Step 4: In the upper right hand corner of your Google Music page, click “Upload Music”. This will prompt you to download Google’s “Music Manager”.

Step 5: Once the download completes, double click the file and let it install on your computer. After it’s installed, it’ll ask you to log in using your Google account. Do that, and then select “upload songs to Google Play”.

Step 6: It’ll ask you where you keep your music collection. Select “other folders” (it’s the last option), then “add folder”. When the window pops up, navigate to your newly created “Google Music from Phone” folder (that should be in your Dropbox) and select it. Click next.

Step 7: This is very important! After you select your “Google Music from Phone” folder as the place that you want Google Music to upload from, the Google Music Manager will ask you: “Do you want to automatically upload songs that you add to your selected folders in the future?” YOU MUST CLICK YES!

Ok, your computer is set up and we’re ready to move onto part 2.

 

Setting Up Your Phone

Step 1: Download the Dropbox mobile application for your smartphone platform (hopefully Android!) and log-in.

Step 2: Download Astro file manager and link it to your Dropbox account.

Step 3: Using Astro file explorer, navigate to the folder where your downloaded music is stored and use the “copy” function to copy the folders that you want uploaded to Google Music.

Step 4: In Astro, click the Dropbox icon, find your “Google Music from Phone” folder, open it, and paste your folders there. (What this does is upload your music files from your phone into the Dropbox folder on you computer, where Google Manager will find them and automatically upload them to your Google Music account!  Give it a few minutes and your music will all be stored on Google’s servers.)

Step 5: If you haven’t already, download the Google Music app, select your account, and enjoy streaming your new music from your phone! All done! Good job!

Hopefully Google will add this feature to their mobile apps in the future, but for now, you just hacked the system! Congratulations!

 

Disclaimer: This will work with Google Drive or any other like service as long as autosyncing is on.

Disclaimer 2: This method will also work with iOS, Windows, and BlackBerry smartphones and tablets

, , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

How to upload songs to Google Music from your smartphone or tablet using Dropbox

Google Music (now officially known as Play Music) is an incredible product. Google allows you to upload your personal music collection to their servers and stream it from your web browser or any Android device absolutely free! The only bummer is that Google has overlooked an important feature: the ability to upload music purchased outside of the Google Play Store to your Google Music account from your smartphone. Naturally, Google is trying to push users to purchase their music from Google Play, but what if you want to buy your music from the Amazon MP3 store, or download it using some other quasi-legal method (shame, shame).

If your looking to upload music from your Android device, (or even your non-Android device…gasp!), you’ve come to the right place. Jump past the break to learn how!

 

You will need a computer of any kind for this workaround to function properly. Got one? Good! We’ll break up our guide into two parts: Part 1: Setting Up Your Computer, and Part 2: Setting Up Your Phone

 

Setting Up Your Computer

Step 1: If you don’t already have it, download and install Dropbox on your computer (this will entail creating a free account, and they will give you 2GB of free storage for life).

Step 2: Once Dropbox is installed, create a folder within Dropbox called “Google Music from Phone” or something that will make it easy to identify later.

Step 3: Once you’ve got your folder created inside Dropbox, use your web browser to navigate to Google Music. If you don’t already have a Google Music account set up, do that now (it’s free).

Step 4: In the upper right hand corner of your Google Music page, click “Upload Music”. This will prompt you to download Google’s “Music Manager”.

Step 5: Once the download completes, double click the file and let it install on your computer. After it’s installed, it’ll ask you to log in using your Google account. Do that, and then select “upload songs to Google Play”.

Step 6: It’ll ask you where you keep your music collection. Select “other folders” (it’s the last option), then “add folder”. When the window pops up, navigate to your newly created “Google Music from Phone” folder (that should be in your Dropbox) and select it. Click next.

Step 7: This is very important! After you select your “Google Music from Phone” folder as the place that you want Google Music to upload from, the Google Music Manager will ask you: “Do you want to automatically upload songs that you add to your selected folders in the future?” YOU MUST CLICK YES!

Ok, your computer is set up and we’re ready to move onto part 2.

 

Setting Up Your Phone

Step 1: Download the Dropbox mobile application for your smartphone platform (hopefully Android!) and log-in.

Step 2: Download Astro file manager and link it to your Dropbox account.

Step 3: Using Astro file explorer, navigate to the folder where your downloaded music is stored and use the “copy” function to copy the folders that you want uploaded to Google Music.

Step 4: In Astro, click the Dropbox icon, find your “Google Music from Phone” folder, open it, and paste your folders there. (What this does is upload your music files from your phone into the Dropbox folder on you computer, where Google Manager will find them and automatically upload them to your Google Music account!  Give it a few minutes and your music will all be stored on Google’s servers.)

Step 5: If you haven’t already, download the Google Music app, select your account, and enjoy streaming your new music from your phone! All done! Good job!

Hopefully Google will add this feature to their mobile apps in the future, but for now, you just hacked the system! Congratulations!

 

Disclaimer: This will work with Google Drive or any other like service as long as autosyncing is on.

Disclaimer 2: This method will also work with iOS, Windows, and BlackBerry smartphones and tablets

, , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

How to upload songs to Google Music from your smartphone or tablet using Dropbox

Google Music (now officially known as Play Music) is an incredible product. Google allows you to upload your personal music collection to their servers and stream it from your web browser or any Android device absolutely free! The only bummer is that Google has overlooked an important feature: the ability to upload music purchased outside of the Google Play Store to your Google Music account from your smartphone. Naturally, Google is trying to push users to purchase their music from Google Play, but what if you want to buy your music from the Amazon MP3 store, or download it using some other quasi-legal method (shame, shame).

If your looking to upload music from your Android device, (or even your non-Android device…gasp!), you’ve come to the right place. Jump past the break to learn how!

 

You will need a computer of any kind for this workaround to function properly. Got one? Good! We’ll break up our guide into two parts: Part 1: Setting Up Your Computer, and Part 2: Setting Up Your Phone

 

Setting Up Your Computer

Step 1: If you don’t already have it, download and install Dropbox on your computer (this will entail creating a free account, and they will give you 2GB of free storage for life).

Step 2: Once Dropbox is installed, create a folder within Dropbox called “Google Music from Phone” or something that will make it easy to identify later.

Step 3: Once you’ve got your folder created inside Dropbox, use your web browser to navigate to Google Music. If you don’t already have a Google Music account set up, do that now (it’s free).

Step 4: In the upper right hand corner of your Google Music page, click “Upload Music”. This will prompt you to download Google’s “Music Manager”.

Step 5: Once the download completes, double click the file and let it install on your computer. After it’s installed, it’ll ask you to log in using your Google account. Do that, and then select “upload songs to Google Play”.

Step 6: It’ll ask you where you keep your music collection. Select “other folders” (it’s the last option), then “add folder”. When the window pops up, navigate to your newly created “Google Music from Phone” folder (that should be in your Dropbox) and select it. Click next.

Step 7: This is very important! After you select your “Google Music from Phone” folder as the place that you want Google Music to upload from, the Google Music Manager will ask you: “Do you want to automatically upload songs that you add to your selected folders in the future?” YOU MUST CLICK YES!

Ok, your computer is set up and we’re ready to move onto part 2.

 

Setting Up Your Phone

Step 1: Download the Dropbox mobile application for your smartphone platform (hopefully Android!) and log-in.

Step 2: Download Astro file manager and link it to your Dropbox account.

Step 3: Using Astro file explorer, navigate to the folder where your downloaded music is stored and use the “copy” function to copy the folders that you want uploaded to Google Music.

Step 4: In Astro, click the Dropbox icon, find your “Google Music from Phone” folder, open it, and paste your folders there. (What this does is upload your music files from your phone into the Dropbox folder on you computer, where Google Manager will find them and automatically upload them to your Google Music account!  Give it a few minutes and your music will all be stored on Google’s servers.)

Step 5: If you haven’t already, download the Google Music app, select your account, and enjoy streaming your new music from your phone! All done! Good job!

Hopefully Google will add this feature to their mobile apps in the future, but for now, you just hacked the system! Congratulations!

 

Disclaimer: This will work with Google Drive or any other like service as long as autosyncing is on.

Disclaimer 2: This method will also work with iOS, Windows, and BlackBerry smartphones and tablets

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No Comments

[Deal Alert] N.O.V.A. 3 currently on sale for $0.99, supports Moga Too

N.O.V.A. 3Still don’t have your fill of apps and games just yet? Well Gameloft has your back, yet again. Looking to help you ring in the new year with another one of their great games. They have just placed N.O.V.A. 3 Near Orbit Vangaurd Alliance on sale from $6.99 clear down to just $0.99. The price alone makes it worth picking up.

N.O.V.A. 3 is the most current release of the series. It brings with it some incredible grapahics, 10 immersive levels across the galaxy, up to 12 player mulitplayer battles in 6 various modes. Let’s not forget to mention that N.O.V.A. 3 is also supported by the Moga controller. So all of you that snagged one of those up during the free controller special have a chance to add another supported game to your collection.

 

As always, feel free to click or scan the QR code below to pick it up before the sale ends.

Application: N.O.V.A. 3
Developer: Gameloft
Cost: $0.99 on sale for a limited time

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Google Music matching explicit songs with clean ones, but contains a stopgap fix

Google Music graffiti Android

Early iTunes Match adopters will remember the unintentional bowdlerization of their music libraries: they’d listen to their scanned music collection on a second device and lose all the colorful language. As we’re quickly learning, Google Music’s newly added scan and match feature isn’t exempt from that problem, either. Those streaming matched copies of explicit songs through the newer service are getting clean versions, with no obvious way to preserve the filth. Google declines to comment on whether or not there’s a long-term fix in the works, although we do know that there’s a temporary solution — choose the “fix incorrect match” option and Google Music will typically upload the raw tracks. We just hope Google starts matching the correct tracks by the next time we want an unfiltered experience for our ears.

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Via: The Verge

Source: Droid-Life

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Gameloft offers ‘Holiday Sale’ on large collection of games in the Play Store, all for $0.99 Each

GameloftTowards the end of last week, Gameloft put a few of their games on sale in the Play Store. We saw Wild Blood and Order & Chaos Online go on sale for a steal at just $0.99. Looks like Gameloft decided to go all-in just the other day and changed the price tags of a very large number games they have to offer in the Play Store. For a limited time you can pick up quite the collection of games, such as Modern Combat 2 and 3, N.O.V.A 2 and 3, The Amazing Spiderman and plenty of other great titles for just $0.99. If you have been waiting for a sale from Gameloft, this is probably the best it is going to be. You can snag any title listed below, or just head to Gamelofts page of apps in the Play Store.

The Dark Knight Rises

Gangstar Rio: City of Saints

N.O.V.A 2

N.O.V.A 3

Modern Combat 2: Black Pegasus

Modern Combat 3: Fallen Nation

9MM

BackStab

The Amazing Spiderman

The Adventures of Tin Tin

Order & Chaos Online

Wild Blood

There could be others, but those are the ones that we know for certain that are on sale. Of course those prices could change at any time, so don’t dilly dally around if you want any of them.

 

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SEGA pushes new Sonic Jump to the Play Store

Sonic JumpWe are sure many of you ran to the Play Store over the last few days and picked up your share of Sonic games from SEGA. They are have a pretty good sale going on right now. If you are looking for some more Sonic action to add to your collection, SEGA has just released a new game, Sonic Jump.

Taking a classic side scrolling platformer and making it go vertical in a jumper game. Sonic, Tails and Knuckles join the action, each with their own unique ability. You will face 48 various levels in story mode across familiar terrain from Green Hill Zone, plus new worlds including Mountain and Jungle Zones. There are even boss battles to take down the evil DR. Eggman. As you progress you will collect rings that you can use to unlock more characters and special abilities to help you along the way. We can’t forget to mention an endless arcade mode as well. Take a gander at some screen.

Sonic Jump 3 Sonic Jump 2 Sonic Jump 1It looks like it should be a pretty great addition to the Sonic legacy. If you are interested in picking up this new title, just click or scan on the QR down below. If you are looking to snag some of the other games from SEGA, you can see what is on sale right now via our SEGA Sale post.

Application: Sonic Jump
Developer: SEGA of America
Cost: $1.99

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Free Scan and Match Feature of Google Play Music offered in the U.S.

Google-Play-Music

Music-lover Android users in the United States must be all pleased to learn about the launch of Google Play Music scan and match feature in the country on Tuesday. The new feature comes almost a month following its first release in Europe last month. Google is also giving its US subscribers with a special treat this holiday season, as it offers matching of the first 20,000 tracks without a charge.

The announcement came after the Internet giant secured contracts with some record companies, giving it a go signal to evaluate their music library and compare it with its own digital collection. It then follows the integration of the scan and match feature to the used-to-be known Android Market and now called, Google Play Music.

The new scan and match service feature of Google Play Music is primarily designed for scanning and rebuilding music collections on cloud media. The feature is incorporated to the user’s online library to facilitate the music uploading procedure.

Given its presence at Google Play Music, Android users in the U.S. will then be able to enjoy instantaneous music downloads, and experience a hassle-free scanning and rebuilding of tracks. Gone were the days when users would have to wait for several days to complete the uploading process of their favorite tracks and add them in to their music collection.

The only reported downside of Google’s scan and match feature at Play Music is the quality of its own collection of tracks, which purportedly could vary sometimes. This denotes a chance that best tracks may not be available to specific users. Unlike before, manual upload is no longer an option if the service could not find a certain track.

Other existing Google Play Music customers may also take advantage of the scan and match feature, a few weeks from now. As initially planned, all previously-uploaded songs in these users’ library will automatically be replaced by then. This could mean bad to some while good to others, depending on their library’s existing contents.

Rivals’ Edge

Compared to its rival scan and match service from Apple and Amazon, Google’s offer takes an edge over pricing.

Rival services would usually cost a user $24.99 a year, just to hold up to 250,000 of storage, by the time they exceed 250 tracks, whereas, Google does not charge its customers at all for the first 20,000 tracks. Google Play however does not offer an option to buy extra storage to upload beyond the specified number of sound tracks for now.

With Apple’s iTunes Match, the users’ music library will be scanned and match up with the tracks available at the iTunes Store. The maximum number of tracks the iTunes Match service could scan and match is at 25,000. But then again, it costs users almost $25 a year.

Amazon’s service, on the other hand, allows its users to import tracks up to 250 for free in the Cloud Player. It also offers a premium subscription called the Cloud Player Premium, which costs around $25 a year, allowing users to import up to 250,000 songs to their music library.

While Amazon has officially released its Cloud Player application for the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, Google has yet to release a Google Music client for iOS devices. It may be offered by some third party at App Store, though.

All downloaded music via Google Play Music can be accessed through Android devices and on a computer with a web-based tool installed.

Google Music was first introduced by the company in November 16, 2011, originally comprising of music store and artist hubs, with Google+ feature.

Source: Phone Arena

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Review: Sherlock Holmes for iPad is Classic Doyle with Modern Enhancements

Sherlock Holmes for the iPad  
Developer: GUTENBERGZ INC  
Price: $1.99   Download

The curiously investigative mind of Doyle comes to life in a modern, interactive way with Sherlock Holmes for the iPad by Gutenbergz. An featuring a small, abridged collection of the adventures of Sherlock Holmes, complete with music, sound effects and hidden surprises, Sherlock Holmes for the iPad introduces the super sleuth to a new generation and breathes new life into old stories for life-long fans. The story of The Five Orange Pips is included in the free download of Sherlock Holmes for iPad and four other stories are available to buy.

Unlike reading a book in plain epub (or similar version) format, reading Sherlock Holmes for the iPad is like a grown-up picture book set to music. In fact, the animation, interactions and music do such a good job of setting the mood for a Sherlock Holmes story it feels like a whole new way to read. Find new hidden objects and interactive elements with each page, or simply read through the story merely taking in the atmosphere. (more…)

Finish reading “Sherlock Holmes for iPad is Classic Doyle with Modern Enhancements” and see screenshots for the app on AppCraver.com.

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Here’s a Compilation of the Top 15 Android Smartphones With the Best and Worst Battery Life

top15-best-battery

Let’s face it, Android devices aren’t generally known for their battery life, with a few exceptions of course. And this holds true because there’s so much running in the background that it’s hard for devices to keep going for long. And to further determine as to which device out there holds the most battery and which one does a bad job at it, the folks at rootuninstaller.com have compiled a list of 15 devices with the best and the worst battery life. And undoubtedly the list is crowded with Samsung smartphones as you would imagine. The surprising part however is that the Motorola Razr Maxx or the Razr Maxx HD aren’t included in the list. So we’re guessing the list included only devices which have a “normal” battery. These statistics were compiled on 474 Android devices and after gathering 5585 battery usage reports. So there’s substantial data collection involved in the making of this list.

top15-worst-battery

Among the list of devices with the best battery life, Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 comes in at number one, followed by the LG Optimus Pro and the Nexus 7 in third. This doesn’t surprise us as these devices have pretty good battery backup, and two of them are tablets, which traditionally come with bigger battery packs. Samsung also tops among the Android devices with the worst battery life. Its Galaxy Mini S5570B and Galaxy Mini S5570L took the first and second place respectively. The Xperia X8 was in third place while the recently launched LG flagship, the Optimus G was at fourth place. Besides the Optimus G, there aren’t too many new devices in the list, which we feel is all thanks to newer versions of Android which do a good job at saving power.

killer-apps

A third graph shows us of the top 15 battery killer apps/processes. These include the OEM applications thanks to the skins and customization bundled with most devices these days. This is not a major concern as processes and apps differ from device to device. The whole list in fact gives us an idea as to how Android devices stand when it comes to battery life. Although, it was a little strange that the list didn’t include the likes of the Galaxy S III, the Galaxy Note II or the Motorola Razr Maxx or Maxx HD. The Galaxy S III and the Note II aren’t necessarily battery hogs, so I don’t think there’s much cause for concern anyways. It was also mentioned that on average, an Android smartphone lasts up to 20.4 hours.

Source: Root Uninstaller
Via: Phone Arena

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Official RedBox Instant app sneaks into the Play Store; rooted users need not apply

We’ve been hearing a lot about Redbox Instant as of late. It has been rumored to be a collaboration between Redbox and Verizon, a natural marriage considering the “red” nature of both companies. A competitor to the likes of Netflix, Redbox Instant will allow you to access a nice collection of movies instantly via streaming. It’s a paid monthly service that Redbox seems to claim will provide more value than Netflix, and checking it out for the first month will cost you no more than the time and bandwidth it takes to download.

One problem is that the app doesn’t seem to be working for rooted devices. Since the error message rooted users receive is a generic error code we can’t tell if Verizon and Redbox meant to implement this restriction, but as it stands Redbox is enjoying an unhealthy dosage of one-star reviews in the Play Store due to the restriction.

The Redbox instant app goes beyond the streaming aspect of it as it has incorporated mobile Redbox reservation features. You can reserve movies at your local box to ensure the movies will be there before you drive out to pick it up. The free month you get will also net your 4 DVD credits so you can check out the physical Redbox service in full.

Other features of the app include the ability to buy and rent titles to watch on your devices, so if there’s one specific movie you want to see without being tied to a subscription option then that certainly is an option. We imagine the selection for buying and renting will be a lot deeper than the selection offered to you through the monthly streaming subscription so that’s one reason why you’d want to go that route for a movie night.

Strangely enough the app is available to non Verizon devices despite Verizon putting its stamp all over it. We’re not sure if this is an early mix-up (without an official announcement they probably didn’t expect it to matter) but let’s hope this isn’t an exclusive for Verizon customers — we would hate for anyone to be left out of the fun. Go ahead and take a look for yourself in the Google Play Store.

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Google Play Music Brings Music Match Feature To The US

You might be thinking, doesn’t Google Play Music already stream my own music back to me? Yes it does but now it does it in a way that has a few hidden bonuses. Not only does matching the music in your collection with music in Google’s library mean all of your music will be played back at 320 kbps, it also eliminates the need for the long upload process. As a guy who still has tracks ripped at 128 kbps, this makes me very happy.

Google launched Play Music, including the music match feature, last month in Europe. The free service has a 20,000 song max. If that’s not enough music for you, check out our guide to the best music streaming options out there.

Source: Google Play on Google+

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Google Play Music Brings Music Match Feature To The US

You might be thinking, doesn’t Google Play Music already stream my own music back to me? Yes it does but now it does it in a way that has a few hidden bonuses. Not only does matching the music in your collection with music in Google’s library mean all of your music will be played back at 320 kbps, it also eliminates the need for the long upload process. As a guy who still has tracks ripped at 128 kbps, this makes me very happy.

Google launched Play Music, including the music match feature, last month in Europe. The free service has a 20,000 song max. If that’s not enough music for you, check out our guide to the best music streaming options out there.

Source: Google Play on Google+

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Google Play Music Brings Music Match Feature To The US

You might be thinking, doesn’t Google Play Music already stream my own music back to me? Yes it does but now it does it in a way that has a few hidden bonuses. Not only does matching the music in your collection with music in Google’s library mean all of your music will be played back at 320 kbps, it also eliminates the need for the long upload process. As a guy who still has tracks ripped at 128 kbps, this makes me very happy.

Google launched Play Music, including the music match feature, last month in Europe. The free service has a 20,000 song max. If that’s not enough music for you, check out our guide to the best music streaming options out there.

Source: Google Play on Google+

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Google Music cloud matching feature now live in the US

When Google finally delivered Google Music to the United Kingdom, the search giant introduced a new feature that many were excited to see. They introduced the ability to automatically scan and match your music in order to add it to your Google Music account, all without the need to endure ridiculously long upload times or even initiate the process yourself. Well, Google has finally brought it to those of us who dwell in the United States.

This is a huge convenience feature that I wish existed when I uploaded my 4,000 song music collection the day Google Music went live. Since I tend to buy a lot of my music from the Play Store now — and since anything I buy outside the Play Store is few and far between — I haven’t had to deal with uploading much music to my account, but I’ll still get a kick out of this feature for the sheer simplicity of it. The music is made available for streaming in bitrates up to 320kbps so you can ensure you’re getting the best quality.

We’re not sure if Google’s going to have any reservations about how it identifies your music. If they go based on the file’s ID3 tags then there should be no issues with any of your music that’s been properly tagged. DRM-enabled music is a different beast altogether that I can’t personally test (I avoid DRM wherever I can).

If you happen to use the feature to add some music you’ve acquired recently let us know how things go in the comments section below, then proceed to grab some headphones and knock yourself out. You can get started at music.google.com.

[via Google+]

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Google Music adds matching for US-based users

Google Music launched in Europe about a month ago, and when it arrived it did so with a feature that was not available for US-based users. That feature was music scanning and matching and in fact, it remained unavailable for US users until today. Simply put, Google has officially announced that those in the US now have access to music matching.

google-music

This feature should make things easier for those just getting started with Google Music. After all, with matching you now have the potential for faster upload times. Well, faster set-up times may be more accurate as the matching can potentially save you from some uploading. As Google notes, they will “scan your collection and quickly rebuild it in the cloud.”

The scanned and matched music will be streamed back at 320 kbps. Also worth noting, Google Music was, and remains available for free. All said and done, this seems like a win for existing Google Music users and it should also be enough for those who held back because they had large music collections and were turned off by the long upload times.

In fact, the one question that seems to remain is whether or not these matched tracks will count against your 20,000 track limit. We suspect they do, however given you are not technically uploading any music, it would be nice if those were not counted towards the 20,000. Of course, we have to wonder how many users are actually uploading 20,000 tracks.

[via Google+]

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Wunderlist 2.0 update now available in Google Play

Wunderlist has been updated and the most recent release can be found in Google Play. And while some may say this app had been overdue considering the previous update came back in June, this 2.0 release appears to have been worth the wait. Yup, Wunderlist has gone up to version 2.0 and along with a fancy new number comes some new features and a new look.

wunderlist

That being said, lets get the basics out of the way — Wunderlist 2.0 is free to download, free to use and requires Android 2.2 or later for use. For those not familiar with Wunderlist, it is a to-do app. But perhaps more important, a to-do app that also syncs with the web as well as with your Mac or Windows computer. Some of the new features include reminders as well as recurring tasks and subtasks.

Other goodies that have come along with v2.0 include improvements in terms of speed and stability, a new background collection, improved widget, Smart Lists, advanced sharing of lists over Facebook, email or phone and what is being described as a new “supercharged” Cloud Sync. The app has also gotten notifications which can be delivered over push or email. In terms of notifications, Wunderlist also has the in-app notifications as well as a new Notification Center.

All said and done, if you were using the previous version of Wunderlist you are going to want to grab the 2.0 release sooner rather than later. And for those who have considered, but not yet begun using Wunderlist, this 2.0 release seems like as good a time as any to give it a shot.

[via wunderkinder]

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Google Music gains scan and match feature in the US

Google Music gains scan and match feature in the US

It wasn’t very long ago that Google Music landed in Europe — to the delight of local music lovers, we’re sure. On its trip across the pond, the service gained a unique new feature called scan and match, wherein Google scans your local music library and makes the songs it matches instantly available in the cloud — no upload required. Until now the feature, which is similar to iTunes Match, was only available in Europe, but it’s coming to the US starting today. From now on, any US Google Play users who upload their music collection will benefit from this new feature. Over time, the company will also upgrade users with existing cloud libraries. It’s a free service and it’s automatic — you’re unlikely to notice that it’s even happening. The upside is that entire collections will be uploaded faster. We’re not aware of any downsides yet — matched songs will be available for streaming at 320Kbps like regular Google Play purchases, while re-downloaded music will be available at or close to the bitrate of the original file.

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Source: Google Play (Google+)

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Google Finally Brings Scan And Match To Play Music, Doesn’t Require Uploading Your Whole Friggin’ Library Anymore

play music logoWhile Google’s been working feverishly to build out its Play Store, bringing it to other countries and expanding its offerings, the company’s music store has been lacking one crucial feature that its competitors have: library matching. Where Amazon and iTunes can scan your current collection and add the songs to your online storage, Google has, until recently, required users to upload every individual track manually. A long and tedious process. In mid-November, the scan and match feature came out for Europe, and today it arrives for US residents.

Where Google differs from Amazon and iTunes, however, is that this scanning and matching service will be entirely free.

Done With This Post? You Might Also Like These:

Google Finally Brings Scan And Match To Play Music, Doesn’t Require Uploading Your Whole Friggin’ Library Anymore was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Google Music scan and match feature now live in the US

Google Music

With the roll out of Google Music in Europe we saw Google include the scan and match feature that offers up a quick scanning of your library and then instantly makes the tracks available in the cloud much like how iTunes Match works. At the time, Google made no efforts to divulge when that feature would see other regions. Now though, they've gone ahead and made it available in the US as per their announcement on Google+:

Traveling this season and want to make sure your music goes with you? Add up to 20,000 songs from your music collection to Google Play and stream it to your Android devices and your computer, anywhere you go.

Our new music matching feature gets your songs into your online music library on Google Play much faster. We’ll scan your collection and quickly rebuild it in the cloud – all for free. And we’ll stream your music back to you at up to 320 kbps.

This feature is live today for people in the US, following our European launch last month. Check it out: http://goo.gl/Hehq6!  It’ll be music to your ears.

The advantage for Google here is the fact that they've kept it free and it's automatic. As a Google Music customer, you're likely to not even notice it happening as it's all pretty much done in the background. It's a pretty slick feature that a lot of people are sure to love.

Source: Google+

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Wunderlist 2.0 update now available in Google Play

Wunderlist has been updated and the most recent release can be found in Google Play. And while some may say this app had been overdue considering the previous update came back in June, this 2.0 release appears to have been worth the wait. Yup, Wunderlist has gone up to version 2.0 and along with a fancy new number comes some new features and a new look.

wunderlist

That being said, lets get the basics out of the way — Wunderlist 2.0 is free to download, free to use and requires Android 2.2 or later for use. For those not familiar with Wunderlist, it is a to-do app. But perhaps more important, a to-do app that also syncs with the web as well as with your Mac or Windows computer. Some of the new features include reminders as well as recurring tasks and subtasks.

Other goodies that have come along with v2.0 include improvements in terms of speed and stability, a new background collection, improved widget, Smart Lists, advanced sharing of lists over Facebook, email or phone and what is being described as a new “supercharged” Cloud Sync. The app has also gotten notifications which can be delivered over push or email. In terms of notifications, Wunderlist also has the in-app notifications as well as a new Notification Center.

All said and done, if you were using the previous version of Wunderlist you are going to want to grab the 2.0 release sooner rather than later. And for those who have considered, but not yet begun using Wunderlist, this 2.0 release seems like as good a time as any to give it a shot.

[via wunderkinder]

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