Posts Tagged crop

What I used in 2012: Andrew Martonik

Andrew's Picks

We cover a whole lot of news here on Android Central, from phones and tablets to apps, accessories and a whole lot more. We put these products and services through their paces harder than most, so when something stands out enough to be used by one of the writers daily, it's usually the cream of the crop. Stick around after the break and see what I used throughout 2012.

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Nova Launcher 2.0 adds loads of new features

Fans of Nova Launcher will be watering at the mouth when they see what the latest version — which happens to be 2.0 — has in store for them. There’s a massive list of changes and new options to be had so let’s take a look and see what 2.3MB upgrade will bring you.

Starting with those who own the premium Nova Launcher Prime package, paying users can now customize the size of icons for app shortcuts, and will also be able to perform swipe actions on any of those icons.

The common crop of changes include custom wallpaper cropping, an infinite scroll drawer setting, a new alphabetical list view for the drawer, a setting for making small dock icons, custom wallpaper cropping, an option to keep the launcher in memory for faster access and more.

Nova launcher has quickly ascended to the thrown as the go-to launcher for those on Android 4.0 and higher, and that’s for good reason. No other Holo-based launcher is touching its list of features and customization options, and the app is backed by one of the most active developers you’ll find in the Play Store. Give it a whirl if you haven’t already, and if the Prime version adds even more value for your particular needs you can buy that for just about $4.

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Leaked images show new red and brown Galaxy Note 2 versions

Android Central

It looks as though the Galaxy Note 2 is going to have some new color options for 2013 — at least brown and red as seen in a leaked image today. The official color names are "Ruby Wine" and "Amber Brown," but we think just "red" and "brown" will do. Our first reaction is to think that these may be carrier- or region-specific variants that get the new colors, but considering that the original two colors made it around the world at launch, we could see these hit the U.S. carriers as well.

This may remind you of a leaked image from a couple days ago which showed a Note 2 in svelte black casing, but AndroidSlash has updated its original story to say that the image appears to be a fan-made fake. For now, the best bet is that we'll see brown and red along with the current crop of colors. Anything more is a bonus.

Source: UnwiredView; AndroidSlash

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(Rumor) Motorola Droid Razr M HD tipped, current top of the line becomes the new mid-range

As the new crop of 2013 super phones begin to leak out, the current top of the line specs are being demoted to a new, lesser role of mid-range. As 1080p displays become the norm for flagship phones, 720p displays will become the norm for lower priced and entry level phones. This is exactly the case in today’s news, as Phone Arena is reporting an anonymous tip about an upcoming upgrade to the current Motorola Droid Razr M, known as the Droid Razr M HD. Needless to say the Droid Razr M HD will have an HD display, rumored to be 4.5 inches at 720×1280 pixels, giving it a healthy pixel density of 326 ppi. Besides an upgraded display, the device is said to use a Snapdragon S4 Plus chip with a 1.5GHz dual-core Krait processor. All this will be powered by a whopping 3,300 mAh battery. All of this sounds very excellent for a mid-range device. Again, this one leans heavy in the rumor department, but if it is all true, living in the future is going to be fun for everyone! Hit the break for a full list of specs.

Design
Device type: Smart phone
OS: Android (4.1) upgradeable to Android 4.2
Form Factor: Candy Bar
Dimensions: 5.15×2.52x.035
Weight: 5.22 OZ

Display
Physical size: 4.5 inches
Resoultion: 720×1280 pixels
Pixel density: 326 ppi
Technology: TFT
Colors: 16 777 216
Touchscreen: Capacitive, Multi-touch
Features: Light sensor, Proximity sensor, Scratch-resistant glass

Battery
Talk time: 21.25 hours
Stand-by time: 15.65
Capacity: 3300 mAh
Type: Li – Polymer

Hardware
System chip: Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Plus MSM8960
Processor: Dual core, 1500 MHz, Krait
Graphics processor: Adreno 225
System memory: 1024 MB RAM (Dual-channel, 500 MHz) / DDR2 / 8192 MB ROM
Built-in storage: 16gb
Storage expansion: microSD, microSDHC up to 32 GB

Source: Phone Arena 

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(Rumor) Motorola Droid Razr M HD tipped, current top of the line becomes the new mid-range

As the new crop of 2013 super phones begin to leak out, the current top of the line specs are being demoted to a new, lesser role of mid-range. As 1080p displays become the norm for flagship phones, 720p displays will become the norm for lower priced and entry level phones. This is exactly the case in today’s news, as Phone Arena is reporting an anonymous tip about an upcoming upgrade to the current Motorola Droid Razr M, known as the Droid Razr M HD. Needless to say the Droid Razr M HD will have an HD display, rumored to be 4.5 inches at 720×1280 pixels, giving it a healthy pixel density of 326 ppi. Besides an upgraded display, the device is said to use a Snapdragon S4 Plus chip with a 1.5GHz dual-core Krait processor. All this will be powered by a whopping 3,300 mAh battery. All of this sounds very excellent for a mid-range device. Again, this one leans heavy in the rumor department, but if it is all true, living in the future is going to be fun for everyone! Hit the break for a full list of specs.

Design
Device type: Smart phone
OS: Android (4.1) upgradeable to Android 4.2
Form Factor: Candy Bar
Dimensions: 5.15×2.52x.035
Weight: 5.22 OZ

Display
Physical size: 4.5 inches
Resoultion: 720×1280 pixels
Pixel density: 326 ppi
Technology: TFT
Colors: 16 777 216
Touchscreen: Capacitive, Multi-touch
Features: Light sensor, Proximity sensor, Scratch-resistant glass

Battery
Talk time: 21.25 hours
Stand-by time: 15.65
Capacity: 3300 mAh
Type: Li – Polymer

Hardware
System chip: Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Plus MSM8960
Processor: Dual core, 1500 MHz, Krait
Graphics processor: Adreno 225
System memory: 1024 MB RAM (Dual-channel, 500 MHz) / DDR2 / 8192 MB ROM
Built-in storage: 16gb
Storage expansion: microSD, microSDHC up to 32 GB

Source: Phone Arena 

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YouTube for 10 inch Android tablets gets refreshed UI with “Guide” feature

YouTube for 10 inch Android tablets has enjoyed a visually appealing carousel-driven UI ever since the Motorola XOOM launched, but it seems to have run its course in Google’s eyes. The company has upgraded the Android application today to introduce a brand new user interface for 10 inch devices.

At first glance this new design takes after those which can be found on phones and 7 inch tablets so there’s nothing too “new” here for those of us who have seen the latest from that crop of devices. The new YouTube Guide feature will feed you video recommendations, hot items from your subscriptions such as video uploads and comments, and more.

Google’s all about content discovery now so it was expected to happen in one way or another. The 10 inch interface is a tad different from the 7 inch interface as the former has a two-pane UI while in landscape mode. Other than that they appear to be the same so those coming from 7 inch tablets or even phones should be right at home here.

Google has also updated its mobile YouTube site to incorporate similar changes, mainly to drive users to the new YouTube Guide feature (though there are also easier controls for sending YouTube videos from your tablet to your internet-connected television). All these new goods can be had by upgrading the app in the Google Play Store or by hitting m.youtube.com.

[via Google+]

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Nik Software and Google bring Snapseed app to Android

Today, Google announced that it is bringing Snapseed to Google Play. The new app is available now on Google Play. You can head to Google Play, to get the app now, although some users are getting errors when clicking on the link.



According to Google’s announcement, “great pictures aren’t taken, they’re made.” Snapseed is an app designed for making photos interesting and fun. Snapseed is sort of like a more advanced version of Instagram; going beyond just the basic filters without crossing into the advanced territories of something like Photoshop.

The app includes basic adjustments such as crop, tune, and straighten. It also comes with plenty of filters to give your photos a more personal feel. Some included filters are drama, black & white, and vintage. Each can be applied individually or in combination.

Another cool feature of Snapseed is what they call Control Point technology. This allows you to only edit a portion of your photo. For example, you could choose to only edit the face of a subject in the picture. As you would expect, you can share your creations to Google+ and other social networks.

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Foodster wants to be your new favorite foodie app

Being the culinary inept person that I am, I’m not a huge fan of foodie apps. I’m more likely to take a Hot Pocket or two out of the freezer and stuff it into the microwave for dinner out of fear that I’ll royally destroy even the most basic of recipes. That said, this new app for Android made me want to get more excited about food just by looking at it.

It’s called Foodster, and developer Matthew Reilly had a hard time selling me on the idea that this app wasn’t made with the help of some nice corporate funding or a large team of developers. Foodster puts more than 10,000 recipes from your favorite sources into your pocket, and it allows you to do it in a way that integrates with your life.

Aside from your typical recipe search, Foodster allows you to keep and maintain shopping lists, as well as get recipes based on the odd crop of ingredients you might not have any obvious use for.

Recipes, shopping lists and folders can be synced across as many different devices as you want, too, so you can browse your favorites in bed at night on your phone, then bring them up on your tablet for easy viewing when you’re ready to make that breakfast masterpiece in the morning.

There’s more to come in version two, and Reilly gives us a sneak peak at what to expect ahead of time: support for Android 2.2 and higher will be added, a free, ad-supported version will be available, and “hipster filters” will allow people to find recipes for those who aren’t particularly interested in being the carnivorous beasts that humans can be.

For now you’ll have to pay $2.49 to experience Foodster in all its glory, but if you can’t bring yourself to give up a morning Starbucks coffee for this app then stay tuned for the free version. Find Foodster in the Google Play Store.

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Sharp’s 5-inch 1080p smartphone stands tall against competition

Samsung, HTC, Motorola and more might have the wireless industry’s ear more than any other crop of OEMs, but there is no shortage of great devices coming from those who aren’t particularly big in the smartphone market. Sharp is one of those companies, and its new 5 inch smartphone is looking to stand toe-to-toe with competition from the big boys.

The company’s 5-inch, 1080p SH930W impresses in a few different areas. The aforementioned display is just one of the many things we can give them a grand “thumbs up” for, but there’s a lot more to be had. With a dual-core 1.5GHz processor, 2GB of RAM, an 8 megapixel rear camera, a 2 megapixel front camera and Jelly Bean out of the box it promises to be no slouch.

Sharp is so confident that its phone can stand with the best of them that it even did so in the handy comparison chart you see above. It likens the phone to the Samsung Galaxy S3, LG Optimus Vu, Samsung Galaxy Note 2 and LG’s Optimus Vu, all pretty great smartphones in their own light.

Oddly missing is the HTC DROID/HTC J Butterfly, the phone which most closely matches its specs with a 5 inch 1080p display. We imagine Sharp left it out to make sure none of the phones could match up to the SH930W’s pixel density of 443 PPI, but we won’t get into the subtleties of marketing. All we know is that the company certainly has the potential to make a bigger name for itself in this sector of the technology world starting with this phone.

Unfortunately, Sharp’s status as a global electronics player won’t matter much with this phone — release plans are still limited to a couple of regions, with Russia and Hong Kong being the only markets we can confirm will get it at this point. The phone is due out at some point in December as the “Q4 2012″ target window doesn’t leave room for much else at this point.

[via Unwired View]


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Thursday Poll: Deal Breaker if a Phone Doesn’t Have a microSD Slot?

During last night’s Droid Life Show, we talked at length about the storage choices that have been made for the newest crop of Android superphones. Google decided long ago that they were no longer supporting expandable storage through microSD card slots, so seeing only internal storage in the Nexus 4 is not a surprise. But [...]

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Nokia Lumia 810 for T-Mobile review

Nokia Lumia 810 for T-Mobile review

After a long wait, the next crop of Windows Phone handsets are beginning to trickle in, and just in time for the holidays. If you’re familiar with our reviews of the HTC 8X and Nokia Lumia 920, you already know that Windows Phone has some impressive contenders in its stable, but these flagship devices only tell half of the story. Now, we’re given an opportunity to test the Lumia 810, a mid-range smartphone that’s now available on T-Mobile.

It’s clear that T-Mobile isn’t looking to start a price war here. At $150 after a rebate, the Lumia 810 costs more than Nokia’s crown jewel, the Lumia 920, which you can find on AT&T for $100. Another telling sign: the phone also costs more than its siblings, the Lumia 820 for AT&T ($50) and the Lumia 822 for Verizon ($100). Naturally, you’ll be able to recoup some of this with T-Mobile’s lower monthly fees, but it goes without saying that T-Mobile is levying an early adopter tax on its subscribers. That said, for those sold on Windows Phone yet unwilling to jump ship, you’re left to choose between the Lumia 810 and the more expensive HTC 8X. Along with its lower cost, Nokia holds an ace up its sleeve in the form of its home-brewed Windows Phone apps, which may be enough to sway customers away from HTC’s flagship. Will the extra card be enough for a winning hand? Join us after the break as we explore the finer points of the Lumia 810.

Continue reading Nokia Lumia 810 for T-Mobile review

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Nokia Lumia 810 for T-Mobile review originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 15 Nov 2012 13:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Samsung Galaxy S III for T-Mobile USA receives its Jelly Bean update

Samsung Galaxy S III for T-Mobile

Sprint was the first major US carrier to start delivering Jelly Bean to Galaxy S III owners, but it no longer stands alone now that the T-Mobile edition is officially receiving its update. If you’re part of the initial crop deemed eligible on Magenta’s network, a check either over-the-air or through Kies should put Android 4.1.1 on the Samsung flagship. T-Mobile’s version of the upgrade delivers the expected dashes of Google Now and Project Butter as well provider-specific fixes for WiFi calling. Don’t worry if there isn’t an immediate notice, as carrier-linked OS updates usually take weeks to get everyone on the same page; the main question is when all the other big US networks will follow suit.

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Samsung Galaxy S III for T-Mobile USA receives its Jelly Bean update originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 14 Nov 2012 09:44:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Wake-up call: Nexus 4 and Nexus 10 go on sale 12pm eastern in the United States

Wake up, wake up, it’s Christmas! Wait… no, that’s not right. It certainly feels like it though. It’s cold outside, my stomach is growling and the gift unwrapping ceremony (ie the launch of a certain crop of devices) is just hours away. I’m talking about the Nexus 4 and Nexus 10, of course, and while our friends across the pond and down under have already sucked the Google Play Store well dry of its stock, us folks in the United States are still waiting on our chance to order one.

Google didn’t confirm what time the Nexus 4 and Nexus 10 would be available before today’s date so we’ve been feverishly checking since late last night. Nothing ever came of our efforts, of course, but that’s because Google’s going for a 12pm eastern launch (which would be 9am for those of you in the pacific time zone).

You’ll still want to be back well before that time to prepare for the feeding frenzy that’s sure to go down because there’s no telling what’s going to happen when these go live. For starters, Google might very well release it a few minutes earlier than scheduled, and you certainly won’t want to be even a second late.

Secondly, if you know the crowd that typically gets excited for Nexus devices and everything Google, then you’ll know that they don’t play around. More than 5,000 tickets for Google I/O sold out in under half an hour, remember?

Consider the fact that those tickets cost some people almost $1,000, and if you factor in travel… well, let’s just say there’s a dedicated bunch that’s going to be looking for this thing. Judging by the UK and Australian sellouts so far we’d say you won’t have long to lollygag because the difference between getting your order in and coming up short could be one missed click, one wasted minute and one server overload error.

Get your credit cards ready — tape it to your display if you have to. Hell, you might even want to memorize it if you haven’t already. Set your autocomplete forms up so you won’t be snagged up by the dreaded shipping and billing information Google will inevitably ask for. Make sure your Google Wallet account has your card all set up and verify that you’ll be ready to purchase this thing once it goes live by trying it out on a cheap app.

You can never be too prepared for this sort of thing, so god speed and good luck to all those looking to add yet another Nexus device to their lives. Be sure to keep an eye out on the official Phandroid Twitter, Facebook and Google+ accounts for notifications of its arrival — we’ll be feeding you the links the moment it goes live. And don’t forget to check out the Nexus 4 and Nexus 10 sections at AndroidForums.com for great and healthy conversation among enthusiasts like yourselves!


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The Nexus Phone family: Four generations of Android

Nexus

From the Nexus One to the Nexus Four — and a couple Galaxies in between

Back in the winter of 2009, the rumors were flying about Google getting into the phone business. Previously they offered what were called Android Developer Phones (we know them as the G1 and the Magic, both made by HTC for Google's reference devices), but this was supposedly something different. Many at Google denied these rumors, but as we all saw the following January, the Nexus One was unveiled.

The Nexus One was a huge leap forward when compared to the current crop of premium smartphones of the time. A fast 1 GHz processor and 512MB of RAM powered the AMOLED screen, and it quickly ushered in an era of what became known as the "superphone."

By today's standards, the Nexus One specs are pretty mediocre, but back then they were unheard of. To go along with these great specs, was a premium build with a unibody design, and a certainty of prompt and early updates to the Android OS. The hardware had it's share of issues, but none of us cared when Froyo came out, because it was fast — and so was the OS update. The Nexus program was a hit, if not a very successful retail venture, and we knew things were going to get interesting.

The Nexus One set the stage for the Nexus line, and what it would become.

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Google explains how its Android 4.2 malware scanner guards the side door

Android's new malware scanner

Sideloading apps on Android implies a whole set of security holes, but the new malware scanner included in Android 4.2 could provide a much-needed plug. Talking to Computerworld, Android VP of Engineering Hiroshi Lockheimer revealed that Google’s been analyzing APKs that crop up online, regardless of whether they’re official market apps or not, in order to maintain a growing database of good and bad code. The scanner — shown above — then works in a similar way to the Bouncer on the front gate, comparing all the apps on your phone to that database. The new sentry helps Google build upon other Android 4.2 security features such as an improved app permission screen and a block against apps sending premium SMS messages in the background. On the other hand, some might say that collecting samples of existing malware will never be as powerful as truly understanding its DNA.

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Google explains how its Android 4.2 malware scanner guards the side door originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 02 Nov 2012 11:36:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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The 7-inch factor: Has Google beaten Apple at their own game?

Here’s a quote: “3.5 inch handset size is the ‘sweet spot’ for mobile phone design; big enough to produce detailed, legible graphics, but small enough to fit comfortably in the hand and pocket.” That was Steve Jobs speaking on his belief that consumers were not and should not be interested in a smartphone with a large display.

Here’s another quote: “7-inch tablets are tweeners: too big to compete with a smartphone and too small to compete with the iPad… the current crop of 7-inch tablets are going to be DOA — dead on arrival.” That was Steve Jobs, again.

Here are the two latest mobile devices unveiled by Apple: the 4-inch iPhone 5 and the 7.9-inch iPad Mini. You can spin that extra nine-tenths of an inch any way you want, but it’s still a tablet in the 7-inch class for all intents and purposes. So why the sudden change of heart, Apple? It would be easy to say that the shift is a clear sign of Apple moving away from Jobs’ ideals in the Tim Cook era, but that doesn’t tell the whole story. In fact, reports state that Jobs was heavily involved in hashing out the design of the iPhone 5 and it’s larger display size before his death.

Sure, the device remains in the arbitrarily determined size range of 3.5 to 4 inches, a size supposedly catered perfectly to operating a device with one hand (though a study from earlier in the year found that 4.5 inches was ideal), but the decision to bump up the iPhone’s size comes as an admission. The market is trending in a direction Apple had not anticipated, and now the company is playing catchup.

Those 7-inch tablets that Jobs labeled as dead on arrival? They have been quickly carving out a space for themselves, stealing market share from Apple’s iPad thanks to the low cost of slates like the Nexus 7 and the media ecosystem of Amazon’s Kindle Fire. Pay no attention to Tim Cook’s ridiculous claims that the iPad Mini “is not a compromised product like [other] 7-inch tablets.”

Cook can backpedal however he likes, but do not believe for a second that Apple wanted to make the iPad Mini. They did not want to make a smaller tablet at a lower price, one that would continue to create an Android-esque fragmentation between devices based on screen size and pull sales away from the more expensive 10-inch iPad.

The iPad Mini is a direct response to 7-inch competitors, but despite claims that it is somehow a more complete experience, it still fails to challenge the Nexus 7 and Kindle Fire in one key area: price. Google and Amazon’s tablets retails for $199. The iPad Mini is priced at $329. Apple will likely sell plenty of iPad Minis based on the brand alone, but will it be enough?

The release of the iPad Mini feels almost like a defensive move on the part of Apple and along with the iPhone 5 signals a huge shift. Gone are the days when Apple’s products push the boundaries of innovation and set the standard for the market. Due to the companies stubborn refusal to stray from the one-size-fits-all approach of Steve Jobs, Apple is the caboose on the 7-inch money train while Google and Amazon are the engineers.


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Intel confirms next-gen, dual-core Medfield + LTE plans

Android Central

The current crop of "Medfield"-based Intel Atom smartphone chips has one major disadvantage compared to much of the ARM-based competition — these SoCs don't support 4G LTE connectivity. Recent Intel-based phones like the Motorola RAZR i and Orange San Diego are 3G/HSPA-only, single-core devices, which has proved a barrier to U.S. carrier uptake. Though these chips boast Intel's Hyperthreading technology for improved multitasking, the chip giant is keen to move into true multi-core territory, while implementing 4G LTE support, allowing it to move into the U.S. market.

Speaking with TechCrunch, Intel's Director of Product Marketing Sumeet Syal said the company was readying LTE products "later this year and ramping into 2013." In the U.S. market in particular, Motorola would be the manufacturer to watch for future LTE-connected Intel-powered phones. Moto has partnered with Intel to develop multiple devices over the next few years, and it's already started with the RAZR i in Europe.

In addition, it should come as no surprise to see Intel readying dual-core Medfield chips to take on higher-end ARM offerings. Syal told TechCrunch "Our next gen product will be a dual-core but again that product will also have hyper threading so essentially… you will also have dual-core with four threads."

It's just the beginning for Intel on Android, and we expect there'll be more to see starting early next year at CES.

Source: TechCrunch

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AT&T releases 4G LTE in Birmingham and Memphis

We’ve just received word from AT&T regarding a couple of southern states getting 4G LTE. Memphis, TN and Birmingham, AL are the latest to the party, and luckily for them they already have some desirable devices to take advantage of the high speed network. Phones like the Galaxy Note, Galaxy S3 and the HTC One X are the cream of the crop on AT&T, and they all have the necessary radios to connect to the great speeds Ma Bell provides. See if you can find that little 4G icon in the upper-right hand corner of your LTE device now.


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Motorola Droid RAZR Maxx HD vs. the iPhone 5

Android Central

So we've already thrown down the gauntlet comparing all aspects of the Samsung Galaxy SIII (S3) and the iPhone 5, and again between the HTC One X and iPhone 5. Just last week, Motorola took the wraps off of its latest offerings, with the Droid RAZR Maxx HD being the cream of the crop. Surely its a worthy follow up to the extremely popular RAZR line, but how does it fare when put up against the latest from Cupertino? Read along and find out.

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Global versions of new RAZR phones inbound

It’s easy to forget that today’s announcements didn’t just pertain to Verizon’s upcoming crop of RAZR devices. Alongside their US-exclusive DROID variants Motorola has confirmed that we’ll be seeing global versions of the Motorola RAZR HD, RAZR MAXX HD, and RAZR M, as well.

While those of us in the US will likely need to import them to use on GSM carriers, customers in Europe, Asia, South America, and Canada will likely be able to grab these through contract plans as well as full price purchases. We can’t say for sure where, exactly, it’s going yet, but at least we know they’re coming.


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DROID RAZR M hands-on posted ahead of official debut

While Motorola and Verizon aren’t set to reveal their  next crop of devices until September 5th, one of the devices said to be shown off that day has fallen into the hands of a soul willing to give it some light hands-on treatment.

The only information that could be extracted from the brains of this lucky soul was that the S4 processor made the device really snappy, and its efficient power consumption alongside a lithium polymer battery made this thing last well into the night.

The device looks like it could come in at the 4-4.3 inches range, but it’s hard to say without any side-by-side references. And if you didn’t think this thing would be coming with 4G LTE you probably haven’t been paying attention to Verizon’s device lineup as of late.

But there are only a few short days until we see what this thing’s really got to show for itself, and we’ll be front and center to bring you all the latest. Keep it tuned here for all the latest, and be sure to discuss the hands-on over at the DROID M forums at AndroidForums.com. [via Engadget]


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Motorola Included a Root Check in the RAZR, RAZR MAXX, and DROID4 With Ice Cream Sandwich

See that little “qe 1/1″ listed on the screenshot above of my DROID RAZR booted into recovery? According to @P3Droid and a variety of testers, this is a root checker of sorts that Motorola has built into the boot and recovery .img files of their current crop of devices, including the RAZR, RAZR MAXX and [...]

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LG teases ‘second-generation’ quad-core phone with Snapdragon S4 Pro

LG has all but confirmed rumors that it's working on a quad-core Snapdragon S4 Pro-powered LTE smartphone, with the launch of a new campaign of Korean language teaser videos. The first video, which is pretty impenetrable if you don't speak Korean, indicates that the new Optimus smartphone will indeed run a quad-core S4 Pro chip, which LG touts as being much faster than the quad-core competition. Also touched upon is the S4 Pro's advanced Adreno 320 GPU, which delivers faster graphics performance than the current crop of chips, including the Adreno 225 GPU used in dual-core S4 chips.

There's nothing to show of the actual phone yet, but LG is clearly hoping to make a splash with this quad-core beast in the fourth quarter, and we'll be watching with keen interest.

Source: LG (Korean), via: The Verge

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HTC working on their own 5-inch phone?

New rumors suggest HTC could be the next major smartphone manufacturer to cross the 5-inch screen threshold, possibly adding a bit of competition for the likes of the Samsung Galaxy Note. Not much is known about the handset, but a report from DigiTimes says the handset will sport a screen resolution of 1794 x 1080 pixels, a hi-res display that would best the current crop of 720p offerings. While not confirmed, there exists a GLBenchmark score for an HTC device with a matching resolution that puts a Snapdragon S4 chipset with Adreno 320 GPU into play.

The HTC phone would join the likes of the LG Optimus Vu and Galaxy Note in an attempt to capitalize on the market for those seeking a device that has the portability of a phone but the functionality of a tablet. With the 4.7-inch screen of the One X, the company is no stranger to large display sizes. But just how successful a phablet offering from the manufacturer might be has us intrigued.

[via DigiTimes]


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GameKlip Makes Gaming On-The-Go Fun And Easy

Now this is a great idea. With the latest crop of superphones like the HTC One X series and Samsung Galaxy S III, Android gaming has gotten a shot in the arm with console quality games. Games such as Shadowgun, Grand Theft Auto III, and Dead Trigger are fun, but the on-screen controls are sometimes clunky.

With a simple OTG USB cable, however, some phones can be connected to game controllers for more precise, and traditional, control schemes. The GameKlip is a plastic tray that easily snaps onto a DualShock3 controller and holds your phone in the perfect position for gaming on-the-go.

There are two versions of the GameKlip. One is for phones that can connect to a DualShock3 controller wirelessly (requires a rooted phone) for $15, and the other is for a wired USB connection, OTG cable included for $23.

Hit the break for pictures and a video of the GameKlip in action.

Click here to view the embedded video.

source: gameklip
via: phandroid


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Amazon for Android update adds “shop by department” feature

Amazon for Android has gotten a very nice upgrade in the Google Play Store. The mot notable feature it’s added is the ability to shop for products by department. This is a very important feature for many folks, myself included.

This will help you drill your searches down even further by eliminating products which don’t fit into your query. (I hated seeing that crappy Lord of the Rings: Battle for Middle Earth RTS when I’m looking for the box set on Blu-Ray.)

Other changes include the ability to search corrections and support for Amazon’s Shop and Save. The usual crop of bug fixes and enhancements are also included, and as per usual Amazon opted not to include details about. [Google Play Store]


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Huawei Ascend G 302D goes public in FCC docs

Huawei Ascend G 302D

It’s a curious thing to have gold signify the low-end, but that’s just what Huawei’s done with its G series smartphone line. That bottom-dwelling, budget tier, first announced at this past Mobile World Congress, has already seen a couple of category cousins come out into the open (see: Vodafone’s G 300 and T-Mobile’s G 312), so color us unsurprised to find yet another single-core, Googlefied device crop up at the FCC. The associated docs leave little to the imagination, treating us to unobstructed images of the Ascend G 302D — presumably, a 4-incher. We’re not quite sure what software the phone’ll run when it ships, though from the looks of those very ICS-like capacitive keys, we wouldn’t rule Android 4.0 out. Spec-wise, we have the included manual and some RF testing to go off of, revealing two different sized batteries — a 1,350mAh and 1,500mAh — support for Bluetooth, WiFi b/g/n and AT&T-compatible radios. That’s not to say this lil’ guy’s guaranteed an official U.S. slot on that carrier’s lineup, but it should make for a decent import option. Hit up the source below for additional shots of this mobile minor leaguer.

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Huawei Ascend G 302D goes public in FCC docs originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 30 Jul 2012 21:19:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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A Palm OS emulator for Android? It will only cost you $49.95

And yes, we mean Palm OS, not the more recently defunct WebOS that ran on the most recent crop of Palm devices. For $49.95 you can experience the proto-smartphone platform all over again right on your far more capable Android handset. OK, so StyleTap’s Palm OS emulator isn’t designed simply to capitalize on people’s nostalgia for clunky mobile operating systems of days past, it is actually designed for business-class customers that still need access to the platform thanks for its association with various pieces of machinery and database systems.

The emulator has been available for iOS, Windows Mobile, and even Symbian, but availability for Android provides businesses with yet another option when outfitting their workforce. The emulator and embedded OS can take full advantage of compatible hardware within current generation devices. If you do, in fact, fall into the category of people that just want a fun trip down memory lane, StyleTap is offering a 14-day free trial upon installing the app (accomplished via sideloading only).

[StyleTap via TheVerge]


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[App Roundup] Our Top Five Favorite New Apps To Check Out From June 2012

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What would be another month without another quick roundup of our top five favorite apps? For those just joining us, our monthly "top five" roundups are meant as a quick primer for those who don’t have time to wade through the dozens upon dozens of awesome apps we’ve looked at in the course of the past four weeks. We’ve selected the cream of the crop, and taken a quick look at five of our favorite apps from June 2012.

Tasker App Factory

First up is Tasker App Factory, an app that, though still in beta, easily gains a spot in our top five for June 2012 thanks to its incredible potential and versatile functionality.

Official Android Police t-shirts are now on sale, with over 25 designs to call yours.

Done With This Post? You Might Also Like These:

[App Roundup] Our Top Five Favorite New Apps To Check Out From June 2012 was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Huawei Emotion UI becomes available for Chinese users

Huawei unveiled their Emotion UI this past May, and now the upgrade is available to their first crop of users. Chinese users who own the Huawei Honor, Huawei Ascend P1, and the Huawei Ascend P1E are all being directed to download the upgrade to their Android 4.0-enabled devices.

This is a huge step up from their current UI which looks like a bad ripoff of SPB Mobile Shell with power controls in the notification pane, though we can’t say for ourselves how well this new interface will perform. Those who apply can download it here, and others may want to wait for word from Huawei for their specific devices. [via Unwired View]


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