Posts Tagged desktop computer

Chrome Remote Desktop now available for Android

Accessing your desktop computer form anywhere just got a lot easier, as Chrome Remote Desktop has left the closed beta program and launched publicly. Currently available on the Play Store, CRD lets you access your computer from any Android device. It’s a neat workaround for remote access, and like Chrome — crosses platforms.


It works pretty simply — download the apps for Chrome and Android (via the Play Store and Chrome Web Store, links below), setting it up on the desktop first. A security code is given for authorization to access your computer, which must be referenced back to your mobile device. From there, it’s smooth sailing, and your Android device acts like a full-fledged remote access point for your computer.

We will caution that CRD asks that you allow some things you may not have been utilizing in the ability to allow devices to access your computer remotely. The Chrome Remote Desktop app for Chrome does a good job of walking you through it all, but keep in mind you may want/need to enable and disable features each time you wish to use it.

In toying with it early on, it definitely looks the part. We are able to use the same gestures as we would with a laptop trackpad, so it really looks as though Google has done their diligence with this one. For those looking to access a computer from the road, this might be the solution. We’ll be sure to bring you more news on this as it develops.

Source: Play Store, Chrome Web Store

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SwiftKey brings their Flow gesture-input to the desktop with ‘Flow Hard’

SwiftKey_Flow_Hard_01

We are big fans of SwiftKey, but I often wondered what it would be like if they could somehow bring their “Flow” feature to the desktop. Well today SwiftKey announced “Flow Hard”, which does just that. Now I can slide my finger from key to key on my desktop computer or laptop. Plus you get SwiftKey’s awesome AI predictions and autocorrecting. You can even type multiple words by using “Flow Through Space”, which allows you to drag your finger over the space bar to quickly type SwiftyKey’s predicted words.

With “Flow Hard”, I will easily save at least 2 hours a day. Check out the video after the break.

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

 

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Lenovo announces the N308, an All-in-One Android computer

Lenovo N308

All-in-one Android powered computer starts at $450

Android Central @ CES

With the start of CES Unveiled Lenovo has taken the wraps of its first all-in-one Android computer, the N308. Having to hop between an Android tablet and a desktop computer can be a bit tedious at times, and Lenovo hopes to have solved that for many people. Featuring a 19.5 inch HD+ display the N308 runs Android 4.2 at launch. Inside the computer you can have either a 320GB or 500GB hard drive depending on preference, and it will support up to 2GB of DDR3 memory as well.

Much like a full desktop computer the N308 has two USB 2.0 ports, a microphone, headphone, and LAN jack as well as a 6-in-1 card reader. In addition it will come with a full sized wireless AccuType keyboard and a wireless mouse. Inside the device you will also find a battery that is said to last about three hours, so if you feel the need to move this 19.5 inch display around with you  it can be done. With full access to Google Play and Amazon's AppStore you will be able to download your favorite Android applications without issue.

Starting at $450 for the base model and going up from there depending on options, Lenovo has unfortunately not given an exact release date at this time. 

    



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PushBullet becomes social, can now send files and links to friends

PushBullet just recently updated their Android app to make their easy-to-use sharing service a two-way street, pushing images, links and other files not only from a desktop computer via a Google Chrome extension but from an Android device to any other registered device as well. True to its promise, the developers have now pushed a new major feature that will make it so much easier to do the same thing with the people in your addressbook as the recipients.

pushbullet-sharing-1

There exists many and myriad ways to share amusing photos, interesting links, and important files with others or even with one’s self, but not all of them are quick or convenient. From sending empty emails to copying and pasting over instant messaging to, lately, uploading and then sharing through services like Dropbox, a lot of these procedures involve multiple steps that are inconvenient to both sender and recipient. PushBullet’s mission is to make that process simpler and it may have just achieved that with this most recent update.

While the service has previously been limited to sending to a user’s own devices, now they can quickly share the same supported items to other people as well. Once the updated Android app has been installed and run, the user will be greeted with a one-time setup asking the user which of the people in the Android contacts list he or she would like to register as PushBullet recipients. Once confirmed, these people will be added to the app’s own contacts, and those who don’t have a PushBullet account will be sent an email inviting them so sign up, which, of course, they can simply ignore. Users can later add more contacts to the list if they wish to do so. Once that has all been done, sharing files, links, photos, and other things becomes no different from sharing it to your own computer via the Android app.

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On the receiving side, things are equally convenient and doesn’t even require having a PushBullet account or the app installed. Those that do, however, will receive a notification which they can simply tap in order to view in the appropriate app. Dismissed notifications will also be dismissed on other registered devices to avoid nagging the user multiple times. Those that don’t have a PushBullet account will simply be sent an email and will be able to view what was pushed without having to sign up first.

pushbullet-sharing-3

The new sharing features in PushBullet are now available in the updated Android app as well as in the Chrome and Firefox extensions. The Chrome extension will be of particular interest to iOS users as it is currently the only way they can received pushed items, albeit only on their computers.

SOURCE: PushBullet
VIA: Android Police

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The Galaxy Note 3 features USB 3.0 along with some added benefits

USB3_cable_Image_1__74180_zoom

Samsung doesn’t usually like spending too much time on specs because they feel their software features sell the phone. However, some specs can actually be a feature. The Galaxy Note 3 sports USB 3.0, which a lot of people are going to find pretty useful.

By far the biggest benefit has to be faster charging when connected to your laptop or desktop computer. With older phones, you have probably noticed that when you connect it to your computer, it charges really slow. That is because USB 2.0 can only charge up to 500 milliamps, but USB 3.0 can charge up to 900 milliamps. That is a lot closer to what you get when plugged into a wall charger. Wall chargers can vary, but you can usually expect around 1,000 milliamps.

The next benefit is that USB 3.0 gives you faster data transfers for transferring music, pictures, and video to and from your phone. We don’t know how much faster since it relies on the quality of storage that Samsung has implemented in the guts of the Note 3.

Now all of this is contingent on your desktop or laptop having a USB 3.0 port. If you bought your computer in the last couple of years, there is a good chance that one of your ports is indeed 3.0.

The last thing you need to know is the connector on a USB 3.0 cable is different than your typical micro USB connector as you can see in the image above. The good news is that if you lose it, you can still insert any of your older microUSB cables, but you won’t get the improved data transfer speeds or faster charging. In fact, it might not even charge at all. Samsung has been known to make their charging ports only compatible with their branded cables. I guess we will have to wait until I get my review unit to find out for sure.

source: SamMobile

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The Galaxy Note 3 features USB 3.0 along with some added benefits

USB3_cable_Image_1__74180_zoom

Samsung doesn’t usually like spending too much time on specs because they feel their software features sell the phone. However, some specs can actually be a feature. The Galaxy Note 3 sports USB 3.0, which a lot of people are going to find pretty useful.

By far the biggest benefit has to be faster charging when connected to your laptop or desktop computer. With older phones, you have probably noticed that when you connect it to your computer, it charges really slow. That is because USB 2.0 can only charge up to 500 milliamps, but USB 3.0 can charge up to 900 milliamps. That is a lot closer to what you get when plugged into a wall charger. Wall chargers can vary, but you can usually expect around 1,000 milliamps.

The next benefit is that USB 3.0 gives you faster data transfers for transferring music, pictures, and video to and from your phone. We don’t know how much faster since it relies on the quality of storage that Samsung has implemented in the guts of the Note 3.

Now all of this is contingent on your desktop or laptop having a USB 3.0 port. If you bought your computer in the last couple of years, there is a good chance that one of your ports is indeed 3.0.

The last thing you need to know is the connector on a USB 3.0 cable is different than your typical micro USB connector as you can see in the image above. The good news is that if you lose it, you can still insert any of your older microUSB cables, but you won’t get the improved data transfer speeds or faster charging. In fact, it might not even charge at all. Samsung has been known to make their charging ports only compatible with their branded cables. I guess we will have to wait until I get my review unit to find out for sure.

source: SamMobile

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How to backup or transfer photos from your Android phone to the cloud or desktop computer

photos

Smartphones make for great point-and-shoot camera replacements, which means many people use their phones exclusively to take all of their photos and keep up with memories. The problem with that is that phones can easily get lost or stolen, SD cards can go bad or any number of things that can cause you to lose months or years of pictures unexpectedly. In this guide, we’re going to go over how to backup your pictures, just in case you run into some data loss down the road.

Option 1 – Backup to your PC

The quickest way to backup your pictures is to connect your device to your computer and copy your photos, but it can be a little confusing to find exactly where your photos are at on your device. Many Android devices have internal storage and an SD card slot, so there can be two possible locations for it, and there’s tons of folders in both locations, especially if you have tons of apps. If you know what you’re looking for, it’s not too hard to navigate, and that’s where this guide comes in.

First things first, connect your phone to one of your computer’s USB ports with your USB cable. If you’re using Windows, you’ll see a new device show up in the left pane of Windows Explorer, around where your hard drive is listed. Some models require a driver or software to be installed in order to see the internal storage. If so, just follow the prompts to install it.

photo backup 1

If you do have a device that has both internal storage and an SD card, you’re going to see two locations listed in your device. “Card” will be the SD card inserted in the phone, obviously, and “Phone” will be the phone’s internal storage. Most people tend to store photos on the SD card so it’s easier to move photos between devices, but either option works. Open up whichever storage you use to hold your pictures, and you’ll be able to see every file and folder that’s stored in it. For this example, we’re going to use the SD card because it’s less likely to be cluttered with folders from apps, but if you’re using your phone’s internal storage to hold your photos, it’s not uncommon to see dozens of folders here. You’re going to want to find the folder labeled DCIM. (Digital Camera IMages)

photo backup 2

Opening your DCIM folder can show a few different folders, but you’re going to want the Camera folder. Open it to make sure all of your photos and videos are in it. Now we need move you stored pictures to your computer’s hard drive for backup. The easiest way to do this is to go back to the root of the DCIM folder (where you can see the Camera folder instead of the individual photos) and right-click and copy that entire Camera folder. Then, find a suitable place to backup your photos, which could be in your Photos library or just your desktop, and right-click and paste the folder. The copy process might take a few minutes depending on how many photos you have, but after it’s done you’ll have two copies of your photos in both places.

If you primarily take photos in other apps, such as Instagram, the photos may not be stored in the DCIM/Camera folder. Most apps will store photos in a Pictures folder, so for Instagram you would look for an Instagram folder inside the Pictures folder on your device storage. Aside from that, however, the copy/paste process is identical.

Dropbox-Logo

Option 2 – Cloud Backup

Connecting your phone to your computer to backup photos is an easy way to keep your memories safe, but it’s still a hassle to connect your device to your computer and manually move everything over. It also isn’t a feasible solution for someone that uses something like a Chromebook or tablet for their primary computer. Fortunately, you can use Dropbox’s fantastic app to automatically keep your photos backed up to the cloud, no cables involved.

If you already use Dropbox to frequently store files in their cloud, setting up Dropbox to automatically sync your photos is a piece of cake. If you don’t have a Dropbox account, you can get a free account and get 2 GB of space to store your photos, which, for most people, is way more than enough storage.

First things first, if you don’t already have the Dropbox application, you can grab it off of Google Play. It’s a free app, so no worries there. You can either sign into your current account or create one. During the initial setup, Dropbox will prompt you to setup your automatic photo backups. You can choose to either upload photos on your data connection and WiFi, or only WiFi. For most people with a data cap, sticking to WiFi uploads is the best option as Dropbox uploads photos immediately after taking them. If you snap a few dozen photos, you can burn through quite a bit of data in a short time without realizing it, and this is doubly true for videos. There’s also an option to go ahead and upload your current photos and videos on your device to Dropbox. Another cool aspect of the photo backup is that your first photo upload gets you an extra 500 MB of free storage space, so you’ll come in close to 2.5 GB total space.

If you already use Dropbox but don’t have the camera upload turned on, you can find the option to turn it on in the settings menu. It walks you through setup just like a first-time user, and you’ll still get your extra 500 MB for your first upload.

All of your uploaded pictures and videos are stored in a Camera Uploads folder in your Dropbox account, which can be accessed from the Dropbox app or any web browser from any device. You can even install the Dropbox desktop application and all your photos will be automatically copied to your desktop/notebook. You will find a Dropbox folder under your username folder (PCs) which always be in sync with the Dropbox website. Once you photos are copied to Dropbox, you can delete them from your phone if you wish. You can also move photos into Dropbox’s Public folder to easily share them with your friends and family, which is a great tool for those of you that are heavily dependent on social networking sites.

The downside to using Dropbox’s Camera Upload is obviously the data usage and battery usage. It’s not a huge battery drain, but naturally the more often your device has to wakeup to upload something, the more effect it’s going to have on your battery. If you don’t mind giving up a bit of battery for the extreme convenience Dropbox offers, though, it’s a great tool to use.

Obviously, Dropbox isn’t the only cloud storage solution for backing up your pictures, but in my opinion, it is easiest to access and effective way. Google offers photo backups through Google+, but they can’t be access in Google Drive the same way Dropbox allows you to from your desktop. Any other cloud service like Box or SkyDrive could also be theoretically used to backup your photos, but they won’t be as automatic as Dropbox.

There are also options for simply moving files around your WiFi network for photo backups, too. For simplicity, though, Dropbox and the direct PC connection are your two best options.

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How to backup or transfer photos from your Android phone to the cloud or desktop computer

photos

Smartphones make for great point-and-shoot camera replacements, which means many people use their phones exclusively to take all of their photos and keep up with memories. The problem with that is that phones can easily get lost or stolen, SD cards can go bad or any number of things that can cause you to lose months or years of pictures unexpectedly. In this guide, we’re going to go over how to backup your pictures, just in case you run into some data loss down the road.

Option 1 – Backup to your PC

The quickest way to backup your pictures is to connect your device to your computer and copy your photos, but it can be a little confusing to find exactly where your photos are at on your device. Many Android devices have internal storage and an SD card slot, so there can be two possible locations for it, and there’s tons of folders in both locations, especially if you have tons of apps. If you know what you’re looking for, it’s not too hard to navigate, and that’s where this guide comes in.

First things first, connect your phone to one of your computer’s USB ports with your USB cable. If you’re using Windows, you’ll see a new device show up in the left pane of Windows Explorer, around where your hard drive is listed. Some models require a driver or software to be installed in order to see the internal storage. If so, just follow the prompts to install it.

photo backup 1

If you do have a device that has both internal storage and an SD card, you’re going to see two locations listed in your device. “Card” will be the SD card inserted in the phone, obviously, and “Phone” will be the phone’s internal storage. Most people tend to store photos on the SD card so it’s easier to move photos between devices, but either option works. Open up whichever storage you use to hold your pictures, and you’ll be able to see every file and folder that’s stored in it. For this example, we’re going to use the SD card because it’s less likely to be cluttered with folders from apps, but if you’re using your phone’s internal storage to hold your photos, it’s not uncommon to see dozens of folders here. You’re going to want to find the folder labeled DCIM. (Digital Camera IMages)

photo backup 2

Opening your DCIM folder can show a few different folders, but you’re going to want the Camera folder. Open it to make sure all of your photos and videos are in it. Now we need move you stored pictures to your computer’s hard drive for backup. The easiest way to do this is to go back to the root of the DCIM folder (where you can see the Camera folder instead of the individual photos) and right-click and copy that entire Camera folder. Then, find a suitable place to backup your photos, which could be in your Photos library or just your desktop, and right-click and paste the folder. The copy process might take a few minutes depending on how many photos you have, but after it’s done you’ll have two copies of your photos in both places.

If you primarily take photos in other apps, such as Instagram, the photos may not be stored in the DCIM/Camera folder. Most apps will store photos in a Pictures folder, so for Instagram you would look for an Instagram folder inside the Pictures folder on your device storage. Aside from that, however, the copy/paste process is identical.

Dropbox-Logo

Option 2 – Cloud Backup

Connecting your phone to your computer to backup photos is an easy way to keep your memories safe, but it’s still a hassle to connect your device to your computer and manually move everything over. It also isn’t a feasible solution for someone that uses something like a Chromebook or tablet for their primary computer. Fortunately, you can use Dropbox’s fantastic app to automatically keep your photos backed up to the cloud, no cables involved.

If you already use Dropbox to frequently store files in their cloud, setting up Dropbox to automatically sync your photos is a piece of cake. If you don’t have a Dropbox account, you can get a free account and get 2 GB of space to store your photos, which, for most people, is way more than enough storage.

First things first, if you don’t already have the Dropbox application, you can grab it off of Google Play. It’s a free app, so no worries there. You can either sign into your current account or create one. During the initial setup, Dropbox will prompt you to setup your automatic photo backups. You can choose to either upload photos on your data connection and WiFi, or only WiFi. For most people with a data cap, sticking to WiFi uploads is the best option as Dropbox uploads photos immediately after taking them. If you snap a few dozen photos, you can burn through quite a bit of data in a short time without realizing it, and this is doubly true for videos. There’s also an option to go ahead and upload your current photos and videos on your device to Dropbox. Another cool aspect of the photo backup is that your first photo upload gets you an extra 500 MB of free storage space, so you’ll come in close to 2.5 GB total space.

If you already use Dropbox but don’t have the camera upload turned on, you can find the option to turn it on in the settings menu. It walks you through setup just like a first-time user, and you’ll still get your extra 500 MB for your first upload.

All of your uploaded pictures and videos are stored in a Camera Uploads folder in your Dropbox account, which can be accessed from the Dropbox app or any web browser from any device. You can even install the Dropbox desktop application and all your photos will be automatically copied to your desktop/notebook. You will find a Dropbox folder under your username folder (PCs) which always be in sync with the Dropbox website. Once you photos are copied to Dropbox, you can delete them from your phone if you wish. You can also move photos into Dropbox’s Public folder to easily share them with your friends and family, which is a great tool for those of you that are heavily dependent on social networking sites.

The downside to using Dropbox’s Camera Upload is obviously the data usage and battery usage. It’s not a huge battery drain, but naturally the more often your device has to wakeup to upload something, the more effect it’s going to have on your battery. If you don’t mind giving up a bit of battery for the extreme convenience Dropbox offers, though, it’s a great tool to use.

Obviously, Dropbox isn’t the only cloud storage solution for backing up your pictures, but in my opinion, it is easiest to access and effective way. Google offers photo backups through Google+, but they can’t be access in Google Drive the same way Dropbox allows you to from your desktop. Any other cloud service like Box or SkyDrive could also be theoretically used to backup your photos, but they won’t be as automatic as Dropbox.

There are also options for simply moving files around your WiFi network for photo backups, too. For simplicity, though, Dropbox and the direct PC connection are your two best options.

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HP Intros Tegra 4-Powered Slate 21 Desktop Computer, Priced at $399

This afternoon, HP announced the Slate 21 all-in-one desktop computer. This isn’t some usual desktop PC though. What makes the Slate 21 unique is that it is powered by NVIDIA’s Tegra 4 processor, as well as featuring Android 4.2.2 as its operating system. Based on Google’s app services, users have access to all of Android’s apps, [...]
HP Intros Tegra 4-Powered Slate 21…

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HP Intros Tegra 4-Powered Slate 21 Desktop Computer, Priced at $399

This afternoon, HP announced the Slate 21 all-in-one desktop computer. This isn’t some usual desktop PC though. What makes the Slate 21 unique is that it is powered by NVIDIA’s Tegra 4 processor, as well as featuring Android 4.2.2 as its operating system. Based on Google’s app services, users have access to all of Android’s apps, [...]
HP Intros Tegra 4-Powered Slate 21…

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Splashtop 2 brings its remote desktop talents to BlackBerry 10

Splashtop 2 brings its remote desktop talents to Blackberry 10

Unless you’re willing to poke around in leaked software, there’s been no way so far to access your desktop computer via that shiny new BlackBerry 10 device — until now. Splashtop 2 has just arrived on the platform to fill that hole, and a quick tryout on our Z10 confirms that it works just as well as on other devices to give you a remote wormhole to your Mac or PC. You’ll be able to seamlessly access your desktop apps and files, watch videos and even play 3D games hosted from your home machine — though we’d wouldn’t count on a great experience for the latter. You can download and use it on your home network for free, but remote usage will run you $1.99 per month or $16.99 per year — still quite a bargain for the terminally tethered.

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Via: Crackberry

Source: Blackberry World

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Video: Testing Out Google’s Conversational Search in Chrome

If you are a Chrome user on your desktop computer, be sure to update to the newest version that was released this morning as it includes Google’s new conversational search. We first saw conversational search at Google I/O last week in one of the more impressive demos from the keynote, and have been waiting for [...]
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Video: Testing Out Google’s Conversational Search in Chrome

If you are a Chrome user on your desktop computer, be sure to update to the newest version that was released this morning as it includes Google’s new conversational search. We first saw conversational search at Google I/O last week in one of the more impressive demos from the keynote, and have been waiting for [...]
Video: Testing Out Google’s Conversational Search in Chrome is a…

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CoolShip seeks support for Android-based desktop computer with keyboard form factor

As the competition for more marketable computers heats up, companies rush to create designs that will enable them to stand out from the rest of the products available in the market.

coolship-android-desktop-keyboard

With this in mind, FocusWill Information Technology Co. is introducing the CoolShip, an Android-based desktop computer that appears like a normal keyboard.Under the hood, however, the most basic version of the device packs a 1.5Ghz dualcore processor, 1GB of RAM, and 4GB of Nand flash storage. A more improved version also comes with a touchpad and a USB mouse. Meanwhile, an advanced package offers a 1.5GHz dualcore CPU, a GB of RAM, 8GB of Nand flash storage, a touchpad, a USB mouse, and an SD card with a capacity of 16GB, and an optional tryout version of CoolShip Operating System. Said OS is a customized version of Android that was created specifically for the CoolShip Android desktop computer. According to its maker, it combines a user experience that is akin to that which one gets from Windows while being based on Android. There is also a Luxury Package available, which comes with a 1.5GHz dualcore processor, 1GB of RAM, 8GB of Nand flash storage, a USB mouse, touchpad, and a 32GB SD card which carries the CoolShip OS tryout version.

The device features an ergonomic keyboard which comes chiclet keys as well as several customized buttons. To function, the CoolShip may be connected to a display through VGA or HDMI.

CoolShip also boasts of being environmentally-friendly, since the device is hardware-upgradeable. It will supposedly need only a new core board to upgrade the device, which will ensure that no additional waste in terms of hardware will be generated to allow the device to be at par with other computers for the next few years.

FocusWill is accepting support for the CoolShip on the crowdfunding website Indiegogo, on which the company has already raised $14,968 out of its goal of $10,000.

Those who are interested in getting one of the first CoolShip devices may pledge $89 for a starter package, $99 for a home package, $119 for an advanced package, $139 for a luxury package, $175 for 2 units of the device without an SD card, $229 for 2 units of the CoolShip, and $249 for 3 units without an SD card, and lastly, $349 for 3 units with an SD card.

FocusWill expects the product to be delivered to its backers by April this year.

via indiegogo

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Chrome Beta for Android now has password syncing and autofill

Chrome for Android password and autofill sync

If you are a fan of using Chrome on your desktop, then you might have saved a few passwords in the browser for auto logins and you might have also saved some form auto fill data in the browser so that you will not have to enter each and every thing on every form you fill. These are two of the most amazing features among many others in Google’s Chrome desktop internet browser. And the company has a mobile version of the software as well, for Android. But that is not as feature rich as this, for sure, but the app has been updated to add these two features to it.

So yes, the Chrome internet browser app on your Android smart phone or tablet can now sync passwords and remember them, along with form auto fill data. This means that you will have to enter your password for a new website or service only one, and it will automatically imported on to your smart phone as well. How cool is that? And if you fill a form on your desktop computer, that same form fill data will be stored on your smart phone browser as well. This is one step closer to complete awesomeness.

For this syncing to take place, you will need to have the latest versions of the Chrome internet browser both on your computer and on your smart phone or other Android devices. You will get an option to select the data types that you want to sync on your Android mobile device. You just need to select the Autofill and the Passwords options to enable these two new features. And after this, every new password and auto fill data will be automatically downloaded to your smart phone. The update may not yet be available to everyone. It is currently rolling out and might take some time to reach all the Android devices out there.

Source: Into Mobile

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Samsung Galaxy Note II Smart Dock Turns your ‘Phablet’ into a Small Desktop

Alright Note takers, it is time to take that newly purchased 5.5-inch phablet and turn it into what it really is, a full on desktop computer. Okay, that might not be what you were looking to do with your big faced phone, but utilizing that large display to the fullest is what you shall do. Samsung has the perfect product for you.

Samsung is going to be releasing a Smart Dock, that will allow you to turn your Galaxy Note II into a mini desktop computer. With USB ports, you will be allowed to connect a mouse and a keyboard to use with your phone. With all the features the Note II has, having a mouse and keyboard will come in handy. There is also an HDMI and stereo audio output just to put that cherry on top of all that goodness. This dock should run you around $100, so it should be on top of your Christmas list if you own a Galaxy Note II.

Source: Engadget

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Motorola CloudBB HMC3260 Android desktop computer

What would be your reaction if I say there is a desktop computer which is running Android as its operating system? Well, do you not believe me? This is true! Motorola has come up with a new device for the Chinese market (only). The Motorola CloudBB HMC3260 is an Android powered desktop computer, which is coming to the market very soon to tickle our senses. Even the thought of Android powering a desktop computer is making me feel funny. It is nothing like I hate Android or anything. I have been an Android fan and user for quite a few years, and hence, I’m pretty sure that the ‘mobile’ operating system is not yet completely ready to take on a desktop computer.

There have been products like this before. For example, the ViewSonic Android powered monitor was a very similar product and it was rightly marketed as a monitor. But Motorola is marketing this product as a desktop computer just because the monitor comes with a keyboard and a mouse. Well, before I talk any further, let’s take a look at this ‘desktop computer.’

The system is going to be running on a 1GHz Freescale i.MX53 ARM Cortex A8 CPU, has 1 GB of RAM, and 4 GB of internal memory. And the monitor is an 18-inch 1366×768 pixels touchscreen. With such an awesome display, you would expect at least Ice Cream Sandwich to be running the show. But unfortunately, it is still the way too old Gingerbread (Android v 2.3.4), which comes with this machine.

The operating system on this machine seems to have some kind of a manufacturer custom overlay, as can be seen from the image. The overlay is designed to give the user a desktop computer look and feel. There is no mention of the availability of a microSD card slot to increase the story capacity. I honestly do not believe that the on board 4 gigs of storage will be enough. Also, the processor seems to a bit under the mark for such an awesome monitor. What do you think?

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Motorola announces Android-powered desktop system with 18.5-inch touchscreen

Android Central

Motorola has just launched a really interesting Android-powered pseudo-computer in China that hosts all sorts of home entertainment content. The HMC3260 has an 18.5-inch LED touchscreen that can play TV shows, movies, play games, browse the web, and otherwise run Android apps. Motorola partnered up with a cloud service provider called WASU to load this thing up with content. Here are the specs. 

  • Freescale i.MX53 ARM Cortex A8 1GHz
  • Memory: 1 GB DDR RAM, 4 GB NAND flash memory.
  • 18.5-inch LED display (1366×768 @ 60Hz, 16:9 widescreen)
  • Android 2.3.4 operating system, customized Android Launcher with rich desktop experience
  • TV and video client and integration
  • Broadband internet access through EuroDOCSIS and LAN (PPPoE / DHCP +, etc.)

While Android is certainly no stranger to dipping its toes in the desktop computer world, it's not often we see big-name manufacturers create an all-out desktop device complete with a mouse and keyboard. It's still running Android 2.3 Gingerbread, so don't expect a whole lot from the Motorola HMC3260, but the concept sure is interesting. 

There's no information on pricing or availability, but you can find more info at the source link below. Could you imagine an Android-powered device that would replace a traditional desktop computer? I'm looking at you, Transformer Prime owners. 

Source: Motorola

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UniFlash Makes Flashing, Modding And Backing Up Your Android Device Easier Than Ever By Using A Desktop Computer

 

While it’s a fairly straightforward process to flash ROMs on an Android device, it can be a bit intimidating especially as users need to also modify or backup their device— which simply can be a complicated process. Thanks to UniFlash, it is now a simpler process that is done all from the comfort of your desktop PC. UniFlash is the brainchild of XDA member MiHailPro and utilizes a simple GUI so users can edit and flash ROMs and partitions, add or remove system apps, edit system files, and even perform and restore backups. This means you’ll be able to edit your various partitions and edit or manage your ROMs without too much concern or worry as you finally have a simpler means through your desktop computer.

The tool is available now though we’d recommend you backup all the contents on your device considering you know, a snafu or two may happen. Hit the thread at the source link to see additional details.

source: XDA Forums

 


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8 Apps for Students

Tablets are often on the top of the list of students who are getting ready to go back to school. However, having the right apps is just as important in helping students with plod through piles of schoolwork. Below are some apps recommended for those who are going back to school this fall.

  1. Air Display. Air Display essentially converts a tablet into a display for a Windows or Mac. The app allows students to have multiple displays sans the need for cables. This app costs $9.99 to download and can be a huge help for those who wish to take advantage of both a tablet and a desktop computer in studying. Download it here.
  2. Quickoffice. Google Play abounds with mobile productivity suites, attesting to the tremendous convenience of having these on tablets. They allow students to create and edit documents, presentations, and spreadsheets right on a tablet or a smartphone. Quickoffice has been identified as one of the best of these office suites. This app costs $20 to download for those on tablets or HD devices, and $15 for those using smartphones. Download it here.
  3. Google Drive. Google Drive is the go-to app for students collaborating on a project. The main advantage of using this device is that the changes made on a file are made available in real time. With the app, users can also upload files such as documents, videos, and photos to their Google Drive account. As a bonus, Google Drive is free to download. Download it here.
  4. Any.Do. Any.Do is the digital version of a to-do list which features gesture-based input and an intuitive interface. Cited as one of the Top 10 Android apps of 2011 by the New York Times and The Best Android app of 2011 by TechCrunch, this simple app is free of features that can distract students from accomplishing their tasks. Download it here.
  5. Google+ (Hangouts). Google+ Hangouts is a free app that enables users to engage in video chat with multiple users. For students, this can be the virtual answer to study groups. Download it here.
  6. Evernote. Evernote is a handy app that facilitates note-taking across various devices including tablets, smartphones, and desktop computers to help users organize their ideas better. A cloud-based app, Evernote is able to sync the notes taken from these devices. Users may not only use this app to save text but also photos, videos, and audio files with their notes. Download it here.
  7. AutoCAD. AutoCAD is an app that those studying to become engineers might want to download. It lets users access DWG, DWF, and DXF files right from their tablets as well as share these files with their classmates through the app itself. Download it here.
  8. Adobe Photoshop Touch. This is the mobile version of the popular photo-editing software and will be useful for design students. With this app, they can use their mobile device to perform simple editing tasks. It doesn’t carry all of the features of the software designed for desktop or laptop computers, but it does get the job done when one needs to edit quickly but does not have a laptop or desktop computer on hand. This app costs $10 from the Google Play Store. Download it here.

When used correctly, apps can increase the productivity of students by helping them save time so they can use the extra hours for more studying. It helps as well that these apps give a novel feel to repetitive tasks, giving students a motivational boost in their studies.

via phandroid

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New iMacs by Apple to Showcase in 2013

Apple is rumored to be introducing changes to their desktop computers, the iMac and the iMac Pro starting next year.

During this week’s Worldwide Developers Conference or the WWDC, the Cupertino company, however, made little mention of its line of desktop computers. Instead, it zeroed in on the changes that are coming to its line of notebooks. Specifically, it revealed that the company is changing the screen of the 15-inch Mac Book Pro with a Retina Display. The Retina Display, which is currently found on the latest iPad, will significantly increase the image quality on the screen of the popular laptop. Apple is as well introducing modifications to the MacBook Air and the other Mac Book Pro laptops.

Despite the lack of attention on the iMac and the iMac Pro, the company is not altogether ignoring the desktop line. An Apple executive, in fact, made mention that the desktop computers will be redesigned and the new models will be released in 2013.

A few weeks before the WWDC, rumors floated around that Apple would be showcasing a new model of the iMac. Last month, Geekbench supported this allegation by releasing benchmarks for an iMac called iMac13,2, a model that is yet to be unveiled to the public.

Prior to these rumors for new iMac models, Apple last updated the desktop computer a little over a year ago, in May 2011. That update added the Thunderbolt port, a high-speed data transfer I/O, as well as FaceTime HD, which enabled iMac users to engage in high definition video chat.

The announcement to introduce new changes to the desktop line gives hope to those who expected that the desktop computer would be ignored by Apple. This fear stems from the fact that Apple today is earning most of its revenue from the iOS via the iPhone, and not on OS X. If Apple is indeed redesigning the iMac and iMac Pro, it should once again bring the desktop computer into focus, especially in the face of Apple’s popular mobile devices.

via apple insider

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How To Root Android Phones

With hundreds of Android devices on the market, many users are curious about how they can root their phones to have full control of their phone.  If you’re thinking about rooting your phone, let’s see how you can benefit from it, the pros and cons and even how you can do it for the phone you have now.

FAQs

What is rooting?

Rooting is a procedure where the user can gain access to the operating system of the phone.  For a second, picture your phone as a desktop computer.  If you were to log on your desktop computer as a guest, you wouldn’t have a lot of options, would you?  When you root an Android device, this is going to give you the freedom of changing anything in the system that the default system generally doesn’t allow you to do.  In desktop terms, you’ll now gain access as an administrator user.  Rooting is very similar to the iPhone jailbreaking situation.

Will I lose data and apps?

One of the biggest concerns that Android users have is if data and apps will be destroyed.  Thankfully, all of your apps will stay intact.  In fact, you probably won’t see much of a difference since the rooting process will just shift a few files around.  Yes, serious problems can happen, but it’s very rare.

Why should I root?

Rooting is a great way to have more freedom with your phone.  Wouldn’t it be cool to change the colors on your wallpaper?  What if you could download apps that make your Android faster?  By pushing the restrictive permissions aside, you’ll have full control of your phone.

The Pros of Rooting

Freedom – While the Android already gives you freedom to download just about any app on the Android Marketplace, rooting will take you one step further giving you complete control.  With a rooted phone, you’ll be able to disable permissions, use FTP clients, customize your home screen, over clock the CPU and tether your phone to treat it like a hotspot.

Backing Up Data – There are many great apps that work solely with rooted phones.  One of the biggest reasons that people root is based on the backup functions.  With certain apps such as Titanium Backup, users can click a button and backup their data from anywhere.

Moving Apps – The problem with a standard Android phone is that when apps are downloaded, it can take up a lot of internal memory.  With a rooted phone, users can have move apps to the SD card and not have them eat up that memory.

Carriers – Don’t want to be locked in with the cell phone carrier that you have now?  Rooting can give you the freedom of choosing any cell phone carrier that you want.

The Cons of Rooting

Warranty – One of the main reasons that people shy away from rooting their Android is because it can potentially void your service provider warranty.   Keep in mind that most rooting processes can be reverted though if this were to happen.  In certain circumstances, there have been reports where users have damaged their data due to rooting improperly.  As long as you follow directions step-by-step, there’s no reason you shouldn’t have this kind of problem.

Data Loss – As touched upon earlier, you can risk the chance of losing all of your data and apps.  To prevent this from happening, just make sure that you backup all of your data ahead of time.  That way, if the worst case scenario does happen, you can restore all of your previous settings.

Buggy – Again, this is not common but some roots can cause the phone to be buggy and glitchy.  This will solely depend upon what route you’ll take when rooting your phone.

How to Root

Rooting can be done through several applications that run directly on your desktop.  One application in particular named SuperOneClick is by far the most popular application used by root junkies.  This application can be run either on Windows or Linux operating systems.  There are other software programs that can be used aside from SuperOneClick such as Unlock Root, Universal Androot and Z4Root.  No matter what software you use, most work the same way with the instructions noted below.

Now, before we start with this process, there are some models that don’t work with this software.  The phones that don’t work are listed below:

  • EVO 4G
  • Incredible by Droid
  • HTC Desire GSM, CDMA and Aria
  • Eric
  • Wildfire

If your phone isn’t on that list, you can follow the directions listed below to successfully root your phone.  If your phone is on the list, you’ll have to take extra steps.  The best way to find these steps is by searching your model plus the word root via a search engine query.  Be forewarned that you should do this at your own risk!

  1. Install the SuperOneClick software online.  This can be done by searching online as there are many resources available.   When found, download it directly to your desktop.  Make sure that you’re running the latest .NET Framework v2.0.
  2. Enable the USB debugging from your Android device.  This can be done by tapping menu, clicking settings > applications > settings.  On the settings menu, click “enable USB debugging.”
  3. After debugging, make sure that your SD isn’t mounted.  Tap your menu button, and click “SD Card & Phone Storage.”  Look for “Unmount SD Card” and click this.
  4. Once these settings have been changed, it’s now time to run the SuperOneClick software on your desktop.  This can be done by double-clicking the SuperOneClick.exe file.  A dialog box should pop up.
  5. Once this box is up, plug your Android into your computer using the USB line.  Click the “root” button on your desktop.  Wait for it to root.  If successfully rooted, you’ll get a success message.  If you receive an error, there’s a good chance your phone isn’t compatible.

Apps Recommended

Your Android phone should successfully be rooted by now if you followed the prompts above.  Now that your Android has been rooted, it’s recommended that you download apps so that you can successfully play around with your phone and files.  Listed below are some apps that most download in order to manage files, execute scripts and manage apps.  It’s highly recommended that you download the apps listed or find an alternative that performs the same job.

  • ES File Explorer:  This file manager app is designed for heavy root users.  You’ll be able to get access to an entire file system, change permissions and even explore data directories.  Beyond file management, this app also has a security manager, SMB client and FTP to transfer files from your PC.
  • Silent App Uninstaller:   Silent App allows you to remove unwanted apps with a click of a button.  The problem with an Android that isn’t rooted is that files can be left on your phone unknowingly.  This app will make sure that every file associated with that app is wiped off your phone.
  • CPU Tuner:  CPU tuner will help regulate the CPU speed and connections.  It will also help save battery power.  With sophisticated features, you’ll be able to create options based on your battery level and can even toggle WiFi and CPU settings.
  • SSH Tunnel:  SSH Tunnel will make sure that no one can drop in and eavesdrop while you’re on a public WiFi network or hotspot.  Since there are a variety of apps that can hack Android devices on hotpots, you’ll want to make sure that you’re protected.

 

When rooting your phone, just make sure that you do your homework first.  You’ll want to make sure that it is something that you’ll truly enjoy.  Remember that even if you don’t like what you’re seeing, you can always change your phone back to the way it was.  If you’re having a hard time with the instructions working above, or you’re finding that your phone doesn’t root, it probably means that your phone isn’t meant for that software package.  Instead, it’s recommended that you search your exact phone model online to see exactly how you can root your phone.  No matter what Android device you own, you can root it some way or another.

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How To Root Android Phones

With hundreds of Android devices on the market, many users are curious about how they can root their phones to have full control of their phone.  If you’re thinking about rooting your phone, let’s see how you can benefit from it, the pros and cons and even how you can do it for the phone you have now.

FAQs

What is rooting?

Rooting is a procedure where the user can gain access to the operating system of the phone.  For a second, picture your phone as a desktop computer.  If you were to log on your desktop computer as a guest, you wouldn’t have a lot of options, would you?  When you root an Android device, this is going to give you the freedom of changing anything in the system that the default system generally doesn’t allow you to do.  In desktop terms, you’ll now gain access as an administrator user.  Rooting is very similar to the iPhone jailbreaking situation.

Will I lose data and apps?

One of the biggest concerns that Android users have is if data and apps will be destroyed.  Thankfully, all of your apps will stay intact.  In fact, you probably won’t see much of a difference since the rooting process will just shift a few files around.  Yes, serious problems can happen, but it’s very rare.

Why should I root?

Rooting is a great way to have more freedom with your phone.  Wouldn’t it be cool to change the colors on your wallpaper?  What if you could download apps that make your Android faster?  By pushing the restrictive permissions aside, you’ll have full control of your phone.

The Pros of Rooting

Freedom – While the Android already gives you freedom to download just about any app on the Android Marketplace, rooting will take you one step further giving you complete control.  With a rooted phone, you’ll be able to disable permissions, use FTP clients, customize your home screen, over clock the CPU and tether your phone to treat it like a hotspot.

Backing Up Data – There are many great apps that work solely with rooted phones.  One of the biggest reasons that people root is based on the backup functions.  With certain apps such as Titanium Backup, users can click a button and backup their data from anywhere.

Moving Apps – The problem with a standard Android phone is that when apps are downloaded, it can take up a lot of internal memory.  With a rooted phone, users can have move apps to the SD card and not have them eat up that memory.

Carriers – Don’t want to be locked in with the cell phone carrier that you have now?  Rooting can give you the freedom of choosing any cell phone carrier that you want.

The Cons of Rooting

Warranty – One of the main reasons that people shy away from rooting their Android is because it can potentially void your service provider warranty.   Keep in mind that most rooting processes can be reverted though if this were to happen.  In certain circumstances, there have been reports where users have damaged their data due to rooting improperly.  As long as you follow directions step-by-step, there’s no reason you shouldn’t have this kind of problem.

Data Loss – As touched upon earlier, you can risk the chance of losing all of your data and apps.  To prevent this from happening, just make sure that you backup all of your data ahead of time.  That way, if the worst case scenario does happen, you can restore all of your previous settings.

Buggy – Again, this is not common but some roots can cause the phone to be buggy and glitchy.  This will solely depend upon what route you’ll take when rooting your phone.

How to Root

Rooting can be done through several applications that run directly on your desktop.  One application in particular named SuperOneClick is by far the most popular application used by root junkies.  This application can be run either on Windows or Linux operating systems.  There are other software programs that can be used aside from SuperOneClick such as Unlock Root, Universal Androot and Z4Root.  No matter what software you use, most work the same way with the instructions noted below.

Now, before we start with this process, there are some models that don’t work with this software.  The phones that don’t work are listed below:

  • EVO 4G
  • Incredible by Droid
  • HTC Desire GSM, CDMA and Aria
  • Eric
  • Wildfire

If your phone isn’t on that list, you can follow the directions listed below to successfully root your phone.  If your phone is on the list, you’ll have to take extra steps.  The best way to find these steps is by searching your model plus the word root via a search engine query.  Be forewarned that you should do this at your own risk!

  1. Install the SuperOneClick software online.  This can be done by searching online as there are many resources available.   When found, download it directly to your desktop.  Make sure that you’re running the latest .NET Framework v2.0.
  2. Enable the USB debugging from your Android device.  This can be done by tapping menu, clicking settings > applications > settings.  On the settings menu, click “enable USB debugging.”
  3. After debugging, make sure that your SD isn’t mounted.  Tap your menu button, and click “SD Card & Phone Storage.”  Look for “Unmount SD Card” and click this.
  4. Once these settings have been changed, it’s now time to run the SuperOneClick software on your desktop.  This can be done by double-clicking the SuperOneClick.exe file.  A dialog box should pop up.
  5. Once this box is up, plug your Android into your computer using the USB line.  Click the “root” button on your desktop.  Wait for it to root.  If successfully rooted, you’ll get a success message.  If you receive an error, there’s a good chance your phone isn’t compatible.

Apps Recommended

Your Android phone should successfully be rooted by now if you followed the prompts above.  Now that your Android has been rooted, it’s recommended that you download apps so that you can successfully play around with your phone and files.  Listed below are some apps that most download in order to manage files, execute scripts and manage apps.  It’s highly recommended that you download the apps listed or find an alternative that performs the same job.

  • ES File Explorer:  This file manager app is designed for heavy root users.  You’ll be able to get access to an entire file system, change permissions and even explore data directories.  Beyond file management, this app also has a security manager, SMB client and FTP to transfer files from your PC.
  • Silent App Uninstaller:   Silent App allows you to remove unwanted apps with a click of a button.  The problem with an Android that isn’t rooted is that files can be left on your phone unknowingly.  This app will make sure that every file associated with that app is wiped off your phone.
  • CPU Tuner:  CPU tuner will help regulate the CPU speed and connections.  It will also help save battery power.  With sophisticated features, you’ll be able to create options based on your battery level and can even toggle WiFi and CPU settings.
  • SSH Tunnel:  SSH Tunnel will make sure that no one can drop in and eavesdrop while you’re on a public WiFi network or hotspot.  Since there are a variety of apps that can hack Android devices on hotpots, you’ll want to make sure that you’re protected.

 

When rooting your phone, just make sure that you do your homework first.  You’ll want to make sure that it is something that you’ll truly enjoy.  Remember that even if you don’t like what you’re seeing, you can always change your phone back to the way it was.  If you’re having a hard time with the instructions working above, or you’re finding that your phone doesn’t root, it probably means that your phone isn’t meant for that software package.  Instead, it’s recommended that you search your exact phone model online to see exactly how you can root your phone.  No matter what Android device you own, you can root it some way or another.

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Sync your Instagram photos to Google+ [How-to]

Instagram album on Google+

We've had quite a few folks ask about a way to post their Instagram pictures to Google+, and an equal number of methods to do so hit our inbox recently. Because Google+ doesn't yet have a public API (tools programmers need to be able to write apps to do this sort of thing), most of the methods are pretty convoluted — including this one. 

But if you can install a few free programs to your desktop computer, this is entirely possible. It's a messy workaround, but once setup it works really well. This method won't automatically post the Instagram pictures to your G+ stream, but it does place them in a public album in your photos.

Hit the break for the instructions.

Source: Wired

read more

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Starting Today, Google Automatically Brings Your Recent Desktop Searches to Mobile in “Recent” Tab

How many times have you found yourself searching for something on your desktop computer just before leaving, then pulling out your phone and having to search for it again from the road? Enough times that you would love it if Google decided to sync those same searches across platforms? You are in luck starting today. [...]

Click through to continue reading…

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Desktop favorite VLC now available for Android

If you’re as adamant about your desktop computer as you are about your Android phone (and if you’re reading this, then odds are pretty good you fall into the latter category) then you’ve probably heard of Video LAN Player, colloquially known as VLC. The Swiss army knife of desktop media players has been on its way to Android for quite some time, but you can try out an unofficial build of the open-source video app now. This version is compiled using published code from the Linux desktop version – a more official app from VideoLAN.org is planned later this year.

Just as you’d expect from VLC, the app handles dozens of file types and codes without complain. The user interface isn’t exactly amazing (par for the course for VLC) but it’s functional and it gets the job done. This breakoff from the VLC code base is currently in its beta release for ARM11, Cortex 8 and Cortex A9-class processors. Video performance is largely contingent upon the power of your phone or tablts CPU/GPU combo, and each one will react differently. But in general terms, the faster your processor is , the smoother your video playback will be at any given quality. Some devices still don’t have hardware acceleration properly configured.

It’s hard to know exactly which version of the beta app you need. Have a gander at this handy guide created by the developers:

  • Snapdragon S1 → ARM11
  • Snapdragon S2/S3 → Cortex-A8/NEON
  • Snapdragon S4 → Cortex-A9
  • Tegra 2 → Cortex-A9
  • Hummingbird → Cortex-A9 (Current gen. only)
  • OMAP3 → Cortex-A8/NEON
  • OMAP4 → Cortex-A9

The basic interface is actually surprisingly good, borrowing here and there from the stock Music app with the handy addition of a visible index bar. Search functions make finding one song in a thousand pretty easy.  If you’re not sure what kind of CPU architecture your Android phone or tablet has, look it up on Device.ac. Remember that this isn’t a final, or even official release – have fun playing local music and videos, but don’t be too upset if something goes bang.


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Android x86 adds Ethernet and VirtualBox support

There’s been a lot of talk about desktop modes i Android this week, but many don’t realize that you can install an experimental build of Android on your laptop or desktop computer right now. Android-x86 is a derivative of open-source Android that runs on standard Intel-compliant hardware, i.e. the vast majority of computers out there. The latest modified version from Android-Dev.ro adds two important features: Ethernet networking support (for small computers like the Atom-based “net-tops” that lack WiFi) and virtualization, so that eager users can try out Android in Virtual Box, VMware or similar programs.

As always with virtualized software, the VirtualBox support is a little tricky: hardware acceleration is a no-go, and Ethernet only works in DHCP mode. On the plus side, it’s running a full version of Ice Cream Sandwich, with new features like shared folders that can be accessed from the host machine and Android at the same time (not unlike plugging in a Honeycomb tablet with MTP file access). Otherwise it works just like the tablet interface you’re (probably) familiar with, just with mouse/touchpad and keyboard.

To install Android-x86, you can download the ISO file and use it like an desktop OS disc. Burn it to a DVD, reboot your computer and get cracking, or just point Virtual Box to the volume. Fair warning, this is a pretty advanced way to try out Android, and having some previous Linux experience under your belt will help no end if things get hairy. The rest of us can just wait patiently for Android Jelly Bean or Ubuntu on Android.


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Poll: Would you use a mobile device as a desktop computer?

This image has no alt text

Needless to say that Android smartphones are powerful gadgets. We have already stopped using our computers and replaced it with our phones to perform many tasks. But as smartphone technology advances, the time when we can completely replace our PCs with our Android smartphones might not be very far off.

I have attempted to replace my laptop computer with the Transformer and laptop dock. This experiment lasted 2 weeks, and to say the least, it was a very frustrating time. But Android is evolving quickly, with quad-core smartphones, Chrome browser, and better UIs and applications being developed every day.

In this video, the user has hooked up his Samsung Galaxy Nexus to a monitor, and managed to get a great desktop experience with the help of a keyboard and touchpad. All main features work great with this set-up, and internet browsing looks like a breeze.

Other manufacturers are already making an attempt to unify computers, tablets and smartphones. Motorola and ASUS being the most notable, with devices like the Transformer, the Padphone and Motorola’s docks / desktop UI.

Using a mobile device as a computer replacement is not too convenient just yet, though. Performance is not quite there, and Android apps are nowhere close to beating some PC programs. Video/image editing, as well as other assignments would be a pain if performed only with a tablet (at least for now).

We have a long way to go, but projects like this make unified computing seem much closer. But what do you guys think? Participate in the poll posted below, and let us know what you think in the comments section.

Take Our Poll

[Source: Clove Via: Droid-Life]


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Video: Use Your Galaxy Nexus As A Desktop Computer

These are the types of tips and tricks we love to see. In this video, a gentleman has taken his Galaxy Nexus and turned it into a fully functional desktop computer. By using a few items that any consumer could purchase or likely already has, this guy just gave all Android nerds an idea to [...]

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[Deal Alert] Splashtop Remote Desktop HD On Sale For Just $6.99 From The Android Market (That’s $3.00 Off)

unnamed1

To celebrate a successful launch on the Blackberry Playbook, the makers of Splashtop Remote Desktop HD have trimmed its price to $6.99 in the Android Market, down from its previous $9.99 price tag.

image

Splashtop’s remote desktop client is one of the most popular apps of its kind, boasting over 5 million mobile users, and optimization for Tegra 2 tablets.

The app allows users surprisingly sophisticated control of their desktop computer from anywhere with an internet (or 3G/4G) connection, providing access to PowerPoint and Keynote presentations, Microsoft Outlook, 3D games, full computer browsing, and various other software not available for Android. …

Official Android Police t-shirts are now on sale, with over 25 designs to call yours.

Done With This Post? You Might Also Like These:

[Deal Alert] Splashtop Remote Desktop HD On Sale For Just $6.99 From The Android Market (That’s $3.00 Off) was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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