Posts Tagged Google Oracle patent claim

Oracle loses again, ordered to pay Google’s legal fees

More bad news is being handed down to the folks at Oracle this week. After completely losing the legal battle with Google over Android and their Java code it looks like they’ve now been ordered to shell out some serious cash and pay back Google for all those pesky legal fees. Double win for Android!

Apparently after Oracle’s multiple (3) attempts in court over this issue, some ground rules this last time were put in place by the Judge stating if Oracle lost, they’d have to cover Google’s legal fees for wasting the courts time. Today this has all been confirmed and it looks like instead of getting millions billions of dollars from Google, they’ll be paying Google back a little over $300,000 for their trouble according to multiple sources close to the matter.

While $300k might not be a lot to a huge company like Oracle, it’s still another blow to them and their egos after this losing battle with Google. The official court documents are available here should you want to look them over and laugh a little. Now hopefully the same thing happens to Apple.

[via AndroidGuys]


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Oracle’s Android patent and copyright claims dismissed

The saga of Oracle vs Google appears to be over. The judge in the long-running trial to determine the validity of Oracle’s copyright and patent claims on the Android platform has declared that APIs cannot be copyrighted, effectively clearing Google of all wrongdoing. The honorable Judge William Alsup declared that anyone can write code to carry out functions identical to APIs. The story isn’t quite over (Oracle could appeal the decision), but it might as well be.

The judge appears to be as tired of the rampant patent litigation in the past few years as we are. Alsup notes that “we should not yield to the temptation to find copyrightability merely to reward an investment made in a body of intellectual property.” Claims on short names and nine lines of code were dismissed on other grounds. With the jury deciding that Google didn’t infringe on Oracle’s (formerly Sun’s) patents, the case is pretty much dead in the water, and it’s extremely unlikely that Google will have to pay any sort of remuneration.

Hopefully this will set a precedent. With hundreds of thousands possibly lost in legal fees for a null gain, Oracle’s patent trolling has been costly and time-consuming for all involved. (Alsup noted himself that Oracle’s case was overblown.) With wide doubt cast upon the validity of software patents in general and the wild litigation in the technology world in particular, let’s hope that we can put this ugly chapter in tech history behind us soon.

[via SlashGear]


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Jury deadlocked in Google vs Oracle copyright case

When it comes to Oracle’s massive copyright and patent case against Google, there’s good news and bad news. The bad news is that the jury has stated that Google infringed upon Oracle’s copyrighted code in the manner of 37 Java APIs used in Android. The good news is that they couldn’t agree on whether these APIs consist of fair use, since they’re openly published for the benefit of Java developers.

At this point, the case could go one of several ways. The presiding judge could simply omit the portion of the verdict that couldn’t be agreed upon, allowing the patent portion of the case to go forward but leaving the copyright claims in limbo. Or, as Google has already put forward, he could declare a mistrial and start the who affair over again. Oracle claims that the RangeCheck code is sufficient to earn is a portion of Google’s profits from Android.

Whatever is decided, this case is set to drag on for weeks or (more probably) months longer. The patent claims in particular are worrying for Android, since it’s at least possible that a verdict in Oracle’s favor could lead to an injunction against Android as an OS. If that were to happen, the legal squabbles between Samsung, HTC, Apple, Microsoft and Motorola would look insignificant in comparison.

[via SlashGear]


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