Posts Tagged handwriting recognition

Google Translate for Android now deciphers handwriting in 13 more languages

Handwriting support in Google Translate for Android

If you’re an Android user traveling to the Middle East or southern Asia, you’ll likely want to grab a just-released update to Google Translate. The new app expands on a recent iOS upgrade with handwriting recognition for 13 extra languages that mostly come from the above two regions; you can now write in Arabic and Persian as well as Indian dialects like Gujarati, Kannada, Punjabi, Tamil and Telugu. You’ll also find support for Bosnian, Cebuano, Hmong, Maltese, Mongolian and Somali. This isn’t the biggest Google Translate refresh that we’ve seen, but it could make all the difference if you’re visiting Dubai or New Delhi.

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Via: Android Police

Source: Google Play

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Vision Objects, The Maker Of MyScript Calculator And MyScript Notes, Looks To Replace Your Keyboard With MyScript Stylus

unnamedThe previous apps from Vision Objects have been a little magical – they had better handwriting recognition than a lot of expensive desktop software suites. MyScript Stylus brings that handwriting recognition to all apps by replacing the keyboard on your phone or tablet.

MyScript Stylus gives you a small writing space where the keyboard usually is. Whatever you scribble in there will be turned into text and dropped into any field on the device in real time.

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Vision Objects, The Maker Of MyScript Calculator And MyScript Notes, Looks To Replace Your Keyboard With MyScript Stylus was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

    

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PhatWares WritePad for iPad and iPhone Adds Sync with Google Drive

WritePad for iPad WritePad for iPad
Rating: 3.5
Price: $8.99  App Store


PhatWare is proud to announce today a new version of WritePad, the top-selling note-taking and handwriting recognition software for iPads and iPhones – now featuring the ability to sync, store, and share documents with Google Drive, bringing the total number of supported cloud services to six.

WritePad offers the highest level of document sharing capabilities built into any iOS note-taking app. WritePad now provides even more ways to store and share documents: six major cloud services, including Box, Dropbox, Evernote, Google Drive, iCloud, and SkyDrive, directly to a computer using iTunes, emailed to co-workers and classmates, exchanged between devices connected to a WiFi network, and shared on social media networks such as Twitter and Facebook.

Beyond its cloud support for syncing, storing and sharing documents, WritePad is also an advanced note-taker for iOS powered by PhatWare’s handwriting recognition engine. Users may take handwritten notes in their own style of handwriting, and the software will convert their handwriting into computer text.

Finish reading PhatWares WritePad for iPad and iPhone Adds Sync with Google Drive.

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Google Translate adds Hindi and Thai handwriting input, camera input for four more languages

Google Translate

Further expanding the methods of communication with a single app.

Android is an operating system that is truly global, and Google is expanding the capabilities of Google Translate today to reflect that by adding important new languages. First are two new languages that can be used for handwriting recognition, and those are Hindi and Thai. It's especially important for handwriting recognition for languages such as these because they have a non-Roman character set that is difficult to use on a standard keyboard layout.

Today's update is also expanding the capabilities of Google Translate's "camera input", which reads languages you capture from physical objects with your phone's camera, to Afrikaans, Greek, Hebrew and Serbian. With these new capabilities in Google Translate for six more languages, Google is adding to an ever-expanding list of foreign languages that can help people communicate whether they're traveling or hosting travelers themselves.

    



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From The Maker Of MyScript Calculator Comes MyScript Notes Annotation/Note-Taking App

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We’ve covered MyScript Calculator several times here at AP, as its handwriting recognition / conversion is, simply put, pretty damn impressive. The developers behind this app have now taken the same technology and brought it to the note-taking table with its newest app, MyScript Notes. Check it out.

Pretty slick, no? This tablet-only app supports palm rejection, sync with popular apps like Dropbox, Facebook, Twitter, S-Note, and more; and has nine available languages: English, French, Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese Simplified, Korean, and Japanese.

Aside from that, it also recognizes handwriting in 30 different languages, including English, French, Greek, Polish, Turkish, and many more.

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From The Maker Of MyScript Calculator Comes MyScript Notes Annotation/Note-Taking App was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

    

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From The Maker Of MyScript Calculator Comes MyScript Notes Annotation/Note-Taking App

myscriptnotes

We’ve covered MyScript Calculator several times here at AP, as its handwriting recognition / conversion is, simply put, pretty damn impressive. The developers behind this app have now taken the same technology and brought it to the note-taking table with its newest app, MyScript Notes. Check it out.

Pretty slick, no? This tablet-only app supports palm rejection, sync with popular apps like Dropbox, Facebook, Twitter, S-Note, and more; and has nine available languages: English, French, Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese Simplified, Korean, and Japanese.

Aside from that, it also recognizes handwriting in 30 different languages, including English, French, Greek, Polish, Turkish, and many more.

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From The Maker Of MyScript Calculator Comes MyScript Notes Annotation/Note-Taking App was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

    

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From The Maker Of MyScript Calculator Comes MyScript Notes Annotation/Note-Taking App

myscriptnotes

We’ve covered MyScript Calculator several times here at AP, as its handwriting recognition / conversion is, simply put, pretty damn impressive. The developers behind this app have now taken the same technology and brought it to the note-taking table with its newest app, MyScript Notes. Check it out.

Pretty slick, no? This tablet-only app supports palm rejection, sync with popular apps like Dropbox, Facebook, Twitter, S-Note, and more; and has nine available languages: English, French, Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese Simplified, Korean, and Japanese.

Aside from that, it also recognizes handwriting in 30 different languages, including English, French, Greek, Polish, Turkish, and many more.

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From The Maker Of MyScript Calculator Comes MyScript Notes Annotation/Note-Taking App was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

    

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Google Search Handwriting Recognition Is Now Faster And Easier

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For those of us using the Latin alphabet (or something at least slightly similar), handwriting our search queries probably seems a little tedious. However, if you’re in the CJK group (Chinese, Japanese, Korean), things get a little harder on a software keyboard when your written language relies on myriad intricate characters. So, a while back, Google introduced handwriting recognition to mobile search, though the focus wasn’t really on those languages specifically at the time.

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Since then, it’s apparently become clear to Goog that this feature is really catching on among the more intricate written languages, and some new features have been introduced to make handwriting search a little easier and faster.

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Google Search Handwriting Recognition Is Now Faster And Easier was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Google Updates Translate, Authenticator, Voice, And 5 Other Apps

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In addition to Google Search, the Google Translate, Authenticator, and Voice apps – along with five others – have been updated today as well, though these revisions aren’t quite as exciting as new Google Now cards.

First, the Translate app received a bump to 2.5.3, adding text recognition via the camera translate function for Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. Handwriting recognition has been added for a number of new languages, as well, including: Afrikaans, Croation, Czech, Icelandic, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Slovak, Slovenian, Ukrainian, and Welsh.

Google Translate

Download Google Translate from Google Play
QR code for https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.google.android.apps.translate

Google Voice is now at 0.4.2.75 (which just made me realize, Google still considers this a pre-1.0 app after over 2 years, yikes), and adds a much-needed fix for a bug that caused duplicate notifications to appear until cleared on each device with the Google Voice app installed (Update: as far as I can tell, the inbox syncing issue across devices remains unfixed – bummer).

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Google Updates Translate, Authenticator, Voice, And 5 Other Apps was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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PhatWare Updates WritePad for iPad, Adds Text-to-Speech Synthesis

WritePad for iPad  
Developer: Stan Miasnikov  
Price: $9.99   Download

PhatWare Corporation is pleased to announce the newest update to its WritePad note-taking app for iPad, enabling vastly improved text input in the user’s own handwriting. WritePad now includes a synthesizer featuring both female and male voices, providing optional audio feedback when handwriting is converted to digital text. This new feature is designed to ensure significantly improved accuracy when inputting handwritten text into a document or email.

Other new features in WritePad 6.5 include:
- Optimization for iOS 6
- The Speak menu command has been added to the popup menu to read out the selected text
- Improved speed and accuracy of engine
- Integrated with iOS system Twitter and Facebook accounts

(more…)

Finish reading “PhatWare Updates WritePad for iPad, Adds Text-to-Speech Synthesis” and see screenshots for the app on AppCraver.com.

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Google Adds Handwriting Recognition To Search In Your Mobile Browser, Makes Search More Awesome

2012-07-26_14h07_11In its endless attempts to make searching easier for everyone, Google has introduced yet another way to search via its mobile site at google.com: handwriting recognition. If you go to Google’s search page from your phone or tablet’s mobile browser, and enable the feature via settings, you can now scribble your searches on the screen, even after receiving results. It’s pretty fancy!

Of course, this does raise the question of if this input method is any faster. In the video above, in an attempt to show how this might be used, we see a man who has had nearly all of his fingers broken scribble the words “ski lessons” on the screen.

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KeyPoint’s Adaptxt keyboard enters beta for Android tablets, adds handwriting for that extra touch

KeyPoint's Adaptxt keyboard enters beta for Android tablets, adds handwriting for that extra touch

Aftermarket keyboard layouts are still relatively rare among tablets, which makes KeyPoint Technologies’ new Adaptxt beta for Android tablets that much more valuable. Along with optionally splitting up the keyboard to make thumb typing that much gentler, it expands on the stock keyboard formula with aggressive word prediction and shortcuts for words or whole sentences. The wait for a tablet version has also rewarded the patient with a handwriting recognition extra, just in case they’d like to revive cursive writing as an art form. The beta is is free to use for anyone who’s running at least Android 2.3 on a big-screened slate, although only for a “limited period” — if you’re willing to accept a few rough edges, we’d recommend hitting the source links before there’s a price tag attached.

KeyPoint’s Adaptxt keyboard enters beta for Android tablets, adds handwriting for that extra touch originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 06 Jul 2012 03:35:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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A Physical Disappearing Touchscreen Keypad? Yes. Tactus Has Done It!

How much do you love your touchscreen device?  Is it anything close to actual physical keys?  I bet that as much as you love the touchscreen – the convenience of tapping away, handwriting recognition and more screen for display without expanding the size of your device, there is some level of dissatisfaction and you sometime wish that your device had a physical keypad.  Tactus, a California-based start-up, today showed off something big – a combination of touchscreen and actual physical keys for handheld devices.

The keypad in question is physical, except that it disappears when you want it to.  If you have been struggling with a touchscreen device, having difficulties typing and wished for an alternative, this is the best you can get at the moment.  The company says that the keypad sheet takes a small room as a layer on the transparent screen.  The company showcased this new display during the 2012 SID as a haptic technology that offers physical disappearing keys.

It may be a little difficult to understand how the keys pop-up on the screen but it is still under development and will most likely be a reality and equipped on phones later this year.  According to sources inside the company, Tactus’ technology may be first equipped on Android phones because they are more dynamic and very add-on friendly.  People with big hands will not have a solution to the small screen problem thanks to this technology.

This technology, for starters, works on touchscreen devices and can only be configured as a QWERTY keyboard in landscape mode.  This means that the keypad may not have extended controls such as arrow keys, function keys or gaming controls as current touchscreens do.

I am certain you are itching to know how this works and how effective it actually is.  Well, Tactus released a short video demonstrating how it works, you better start googling it.

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Google Translate Gets Overhauled Ice Cream Sandwich UI In Newest Update

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Google Translate has just seen a beautiful new update in the Play Store this evening. The entire app has been given the “Holo” theme treatment, making the app feel right at home on your Android 4.0 device. Users are noticing how scary accurate the handwriting recognition is (spot on with the above chicken scratch).

Can’t help but wonder if this is something Google has been working on behind the scenes for Android 4.1 Jelly Bean. No matter, give it a try for yourself in the new Google Translate update currently available in the Google Play Store.

[Play Store Link]


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PhatWare Releases WritePad 6.3 for iPhone, drops price

download app WritePad
Developer: Stan Miasnikov
Price: $0.99
Download from the App Store
User Ratings:
2.5

PhatWare Corporation announces today the immediate availability of WritePad 6.3 for iPhone and iPod touch, enabling vastly improved text input in the user’s own handwriting on the iOS platform. WritePad 6.3 features improved application performance and multilingual handwriting recognition technology supporting eleven languages, including English, Danish, Dutch, German, Finnish, French, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Swedish, and Spanish.

WritePad is an advanced note-taker for iOS, which converts practically any handwriting into computer text. Notes created with WritePad can be sent via email or SMS, tweeted, saved, posted on a Facebook wall, printed, exported as PDF, translated to other languages, synchronized with Dropbox, and exchanged directly between two or more iOS devices. WritePad also features integration with events, contacts, maps, and other iPhone resources.

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State of the Mobile Nations survey – The point of the stylus

 

Mobile Nations

Steve Jobs put an end to the Newton project, largely because he hated the concept of using a stylus. The original Palm Pilot was a runaway hit – largely because of the use of the stylus and its handwriting recognition. Now, Palm is dead and Apple is ginormous and Samsung's going all out with the Galaxy Note. So, who was right? Well, maybe they all were.

Just as the iPad is reaching the stratosphere in usage, the stylus is making a comeback.

So, we want to know what you think. Does the stylus inhibit or amplify your touch screen experience? Let us know by taking the short survey below.

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Collaborate With PhatPad For Android Now Available

Collaborating, sharing and working together wirelessly on smartphones and tablets is becoming a great new way to brainstorm and handle project management. A cool app with a phat name, has now been released for Android which makes brainstorming and collaborating both easy and fun.

Phatware’s new Phatpad for Android tablets and phones, is a feature packed collaboration tool with proven handwriting recognition technology. With phatpad users can brainstorm and collaborate, draw, write, and type together on any Android tablet or phone by way of email, wifi or dropbox.

Continue after the break

 “The beauty of PhatPad as a note-taking, collaboration and brainstorming tool is that it allows users to draw pictures, jot notes, or put a mixture of pictures, drawings, handwritten and typed text on a virtual scratch pad,” said Stan Miasnikov, president of PhatWare Corp. “PhatPad’s handwriting recognition engine allows users to convert previously recorded handwritten notes into digital text, and edit text using either the handwriting input panel or the keyboard.”

android phone, android app, ipad
Other features of PhatPad include:

·        Smooth-flowing digital ink technology which lets Android tablet and smartphone users scribble notes as if they are writing on real paper

·        The ability to combine drawing, handwritten text, images, and digital text on the same document page as well as voice notes to create media-rich content

·        A powerful handwriting recognition engine, which automatically converts handwritten notes into text

·        Document sharing using Dropbox synchronization, PDF, WiFi, and email

·        Voice notes – record, play, and use in presentation mode

·        Scroll, zoom and variable page size

Check it out for yourself in the Android Market

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Google Translate updates with handwriting recognition

Google’s translation engine has impressed me ever since the first time I used it on the web, and its continual evolution only impresses me more. The latest in a string of updates to Google’s Translate app for Android adds handwriting recognition, allowing users to write out phrases instead of typing them. At the moment, only seven languages use this feature: English, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese and Spanish.

While most westerners can probably type out words and phrases a lot faster than they can write them (on a phone screen, anyway) the complex characters of Chinese and Japanese don’t cooperate well with keyboards formatted for languages based on Arabic characters. Obviously Android phones sold in Asia don’t have this problem, but if you’re traveling and using your phone for some technology assisted dialogue, it’s a great way to make it easier for the other party to respond. If the Google Translate team follows its regular patterns of behavior, more languages should follow in the next few months.

Of course, you’ll need some decent penmanship for Translate to be able to understand you. That can be a tall order on capacitive screens, where touch strokes have more in common with finger painting than calligraphy. This is the sort of thing that the Samsung Galaxy Note was made for, with its huge screen, S-Pen stylus and Wacom digitizer. You can download the latest version of Google Translate in the Android Market, whatever your screen size.

[via Android Police]

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Google Translate app update adds handwriting recognition, breaks barriers

The Google Translate app for Android received a pretty significant update yesterday, bringing handwriting recognition to its bullpen of functionalities. The app, which added voice recognition back in October, can now recognize handwriting in seven different languages, including English, French, Italian, German, and Spanish. It’s probably most important, however, for Chinese- and Japanese-speaking contingents, who can now use their handsets to translate characters that aren’t typically featured on English keypads. The update to version 2.3 is available now, at the source link below.

Google Translate app update adds handwriting recognition, breaks barriers originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 15 Dec 2011 13:30:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Android Police  |  sourceAndroid Market  | Email this | Comments

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Google Translate Updated, Now Allows For Handwriting Recognition In Seven Different Languages

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Google Translate just got a little update that brings big functionality: the ability to recognize written words in seven different languages. The previous version allowed for text and spoken input only, so this update adds just another method to the mix.

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You may be asking yourself why is this a big deal? This is a useful feature partly due to the fact that it can translate Chinese and Japanese, which both use characters that are uncommon to English keyboards. Other languages with handwriting recognition include: English, French, Italian, German, and Spanish.

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Google Translate Updated with Handwriting Recognition

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Google Translate is a great tool for deciphering foreign languages on the go, and it’s getting better. With the addition of handwriting recognition in a new update, users now have the benefit of translating languages with characters not typically found on an English keyboard, such as Japanese and Chinese. Those two languages are joined by English, French, Italian, German, and Spanish in supporting the new feature. Text and voice input still figure to be a big part of using the app, but this latest wrinkle opens up a world of possibilities.

Android Market Link: Google Translate

[via AndroidPolice]


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PhatWare opens up Beta program on new collaboration App

Many users out there are part of complex business or spend lots of time sharing ideas, notes and images with friends. Having the ability to collaborate with your friends or your co-works in an easy way is very important. That is what PhatWare is hoping to offer.

The app is a note-taking and collaboration app featuring their proven handwriting recognition technology. Using the software you will be able to turn nearly every tablet or smart phone into a brainstorming tool to let you draw, write, and type. You can instantly share your ideas via email or sync with you dropbox account.

Using PhatWare’s PhatPad application the user will be able to combine handwritten text, drawings, images and digital text one document. You can even toss in a voice note for good measure if you feel so inclined. One thing that makes PhatPad so great is the cross-platform support. They already have this application available on the iPad and you would be able to easily share and collaborate your work with all users of PhatPad.

Feel free to check it out. It is only available for free for a short period of time during the beta testing until December 31st. That should give you plenty of time to see how it can enrich your life. Be sure to provide feed back to the company to help them make this an amazing product for us all.

Head on over to PhatWare.com to check it out and pick up the file for testing.

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Full press release below

Mountain View, CA, November 23, 2011 – PhatWare is inviting Android users to join their PhatPad for Android public beta program aimed at improving brainstorming, note-taking and collaboration on Android devices.

PhatPad is a note-taking and collaboration app featuring PhatWare’s proven handwriting recognition technology. More than just a note-taking app, PhatPad turns practically any Android tablet or smartphone into an advanced brainstorming tool by enabling users to draw, write, and type on the Android device, then instantly share ideas via email or sync their documents with Dropbox.

PhatPad’s key features include:

•       Smooth-flowing digital ink technology which lets Android Tablet users scribble notes as if they are writing on real paper
•       The ability to combine drawing, handwritten text, images, and digital text on the same document page as well as voice notes to create media-rich content
•       A powerful handwriting recognition engine which automatically converts handwritten notes into text
•       A desktop synchronization via Dropbox
•       File sharing via email and PDF export
•       Scroll, Zoom and variable page size
The beauty of PhatPad as a note-taking, collaboration and brainstorming tool is that it allows users to draw pictures, jot notes, or put a mixture of pictures, drawings, handwritten and typed text on a virtual scratch pad. The included handwriting recognition engine allows PhatPad users to convert previously recorded handwritten notes into digital text, and edit text using either the handwriting input panel or the keyboard. PhatPad documents can be synchronized with the Dropbox, emailed, or exported to PDF.

PhatPad application is also available on iPad devices, allowing sharing of PhatPad documents between iOS and Android platforms.

The beta software is available immediately to consumers for beta testing, and PhatWare welcomes user participation and feedback. For more information and to participate in the PhatPad for Android beta program, please visit PhatWare’s web site at www.phatware.com/phatpadbeta.

About PhatWare

Founded in October 1997, PhatWare Corporation is a leading provider of easy to use powerful software products and professional services for the mobile and desktop computing marketplace. PhatWare specializes in handwriting recognition, digital ink, note taking, and database and network management software development. PhatWare’s products include such popular titles as WritePad™, CalliGrapher®, PenOffice®, PhatNotes™, and others. PhatWare Corporation is a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner, and Intel Software Partner. To learn more about PhatWare, visit www.phatware.com.

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PhatPad launches Android beta of iPad collaborative notes tool

PhatPad’s been out on iPad for a few months now, giving Apple users a single note app that lets them share projects via drawing, handwriting recognition and image capture. There’s now an Android beta release of the app, which has all of that. For us.

Here’s what it looks like on an Android tablet:

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The PhatPad beta can be downloaded directly as an APK file from the maker’s site here. The Apple version is a paid release, so we’d expect them to start charging for this once it’s out of beta. Or plaster it in ads.

Related posts:

  1. Sony DNA launches Video Trimmer editing tool for Android
  2. Swype Beta 3.26 adds auto updates, more languages and nicer menus
  3. Swype Beta updated to v3.25 – with “Swype Gestures” and more

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Apps Of The Day: Sim City Deluxe & Writepad

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Every day we peruse the Android Market looking for the best, worst, interesting, and most unique apps in an effort to sift out a few gems. We call it Apps of the Day. We can’t guarantee that every app featured below is a real winner, but each is worth at least a quick look. It’s all in an effort to help you, our faithful readers, get the most out of your Android handsets. Read on to see what we found today!

Writepad - The company behind handwriting recognition app WritePad just updated their app and it now supports print, cursive, or mixed writing on phones, tablets, and stylus-enabled Android devices in addition to improving their overall recognition capabilities. I can see where this might come in handy on a tablet, especially within the framework of specific apps or tasks, but I’m not so sure I want to be writing on a phone. Anyone with me? Of course I’m not a Swype fan either… [Market Link]

Sim City Deluxe - Sim City on my Android phone? It’s more likely than you think. EA released this mobile edition of the popular city-building franchise today. It isn’t as full-fledged as its PC counterpart, but the same basic concepts still apply as you build and manipulate your city. The game plays out in scenarios that see you taking the reigns of several pre-established cities. You can further grow the city and add your own touch with real-life landmarks. Just go easy on the earthquakes and alien invasions. [Market Link]


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The Panasonic Toughpad A1: A Droppable, Everything Proof 10-Inch Tablet, Coming Spring 2012 For $1300; 7 Inch "B1" Version Coming Fall 2012

imgresThe makers of the darn-near invincible Toughbooks are taking on the tablet world. Today Panasonic announced the "Toughpad" family. There are 2 versions, the A1, a 10.1 incher; and the B1, a forthcoming 7 inch.

The A1 has a 10.1 inch, 4:3, XGA (1024×768), daylight viewable screen. It has capacitive touch and "offers" a stylus for handwriting recognition. The main feature though, is its ability to take your abuse. Get it wet, hot, cold, sandy, or drop it, and the Toughpad will keep on working. Your wallet is going to have to be pretty tough too, the 10 inch version…

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The Panasonic Toughpad A1: A Droppable, Everything Proof 10-Inch Tablet, Coming Spring 2012 For $1300; 7 Inch "B1" Version Coming Fall 2012 was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Holiday Gift Guide: Targus 3 In 1 Stylus

So far we’ve seen two great stylus’ this year, the Bracketron 2 in 1 stylus and now this one by Targus. The Targus 3 in 1 stylus has one more “in 1″ that the stylus by Bracketron. What could it be you ask? How about an old fashioned laser pointer. See with the Styli this year we’re going retro back to the 90′s…

With tablets bubbling with popularity this year and one of the most sought after items for this Holiday Shopping Season there are going to be many styli finding their way into Christmas Stockings. Styli come in handy with capacitive touch screens because they help keep the screen cleaner and allow the user to write more fluidly, especially in handwriting recognition programs.

Targus, a trusted name in top accessories for business professionals has fused the capacitive touch stylus with a ball point pen and a laser pointer.

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The 3 in 1 stylus is a steal at just $33 bucks from Amazon and makes a great holiday gift.

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Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich brings native stylus support

We already know that Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich will be getting all sorts of cool new upgrades and features. The tweaks will be many and a tip has surfaced today that those wishing for a stylus for their device will love. Google has confirmed that ICS will bring with it native support for a stylus allowing the tablet or smartphone to be controlled with the users fingers or a stylus.

Apparently, an API first spotted by Reddit can differentiate between a stylus, finger, mouse, and eraser. It will also support pens with up to three buttons. It sounds like this will be the operating system for the designers out there that want to draw directly on the Android tablet. If you are wondering the existing tablets that have pens, the HTC Flyer and the Samsung Galaxy Note both had custom pen-control software.

Google also expects that the new native support for a stylus will also boost the precision for gestures on the screen. Handwriting recognition is also possible, but Android has no native handwriting recognition engine at this time. The coming of a native stylus control system for ICS leaves questions as to what Samsung and HTC will do with their proprietary systems. Both had held their system would be adopted by devs.

[via SlashGear]

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Galaxy Note Hands-on [Video]

Bigger than a Galaxy S II but smaller than a new Galaxy Tab 7.7; offering the latest in capacitive touch but also a stylus; the Samsung Galaxy Note is a device with a few personalities. Intended to pull together phone, paper notebook, games device and tablet into one pen-enabled smart handheld, it’s certainly one of the more ambitious gadgets we’ve seen at IFA 2011.

First impressions are that it’s an oversized Galaxy S II, with pretty much identical design language. It’s obviously bigger, though not as thick as you might expect; you can still slot it neatly into a front trouser pocket, for instance. The stylus whips out of the bottom – unlike HTC’s Flyer, it gets a dedicated storage slot – and can be used to grab and annotate screenshots, write handwritten emails and messages, use handwriting-recognition (which works surprisingly well with neat cursive) and generally navigate the phone. That would be pointless if the accuracy wasn’t up to scratch, but it is: we could get fine-flowing ink and various line-widths thanks to the pressure sensitivity.

The 5.3-inch Super AMOLED HD display is, at 1280 x 800, the same resolution as Samsung’s tablet line-up, but the panel technology shows its worth with huge viewing angles and brilliant colors and detail. Colors don’t invert even when you’re looking almost side-on. At 178g and 9.65mm thick it’s a little more in the hand or pocket than the GSII but still easy to hold in a single hand, and the bigger display makes using the on-screen keyboard a particular pleasure.

Samsung’s TouchWiz-customized Android Gingerbread software isn’t finalized yet, but the Galaxy Note still put in a solid showing. The custom S Memo app works well, showing up as a sharing option in the standard Android list, and allowing you to clip photos, voice, text, handwriting and drawings; alternatively you can take a screenshot by holding down the side button on the active stylus and double-tapping the display. Crops can be freehand shapes, and eventually Samsung will release a collaborative whiteboarding app, which will allow two remote Galaxy Note owners to work together on the same page.

Galaxy Note Hands-on

Then there’s S Planner and Samsung’s other customized apps to suit the higher-resolution screen. Gone is the wood-effect UI on the Galaxy Tab, replaced by a feature-packed Filofax alternative with pinch-zooming between the various month/week/etc views and support for dragging and dropping appointments around your schedule. It works well, and the extra pixels mean less swiping and paging to find exactly what you’re looking for or get an overview of your week or month. The email app is polished too, with a split-screen view in landscape orientation that shows inbox and message preview simultaneously. Unfortunately the Gmail app is Google’s standard one.

We’re still waiting to see just how long the 2,500 mAh user-accessible battery will last, if owners of the Galaxy Note take Samsung at its word and try to replace their phone, media player, notebook and portable games device in one sweep. Similarly, Samsung’s plans for the S Pen SDK, allowing third-parties to take advantage of the stylus, will depend on how keen developers are to further customize their apps. Still, while before we might have said 5+ inches was too big for a smartphone, the Galaxy Note has us reconsidering.

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Confirmed: HTC Flyer On Sale At (Some) Best Buy Stores Right Now

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That’s right, folks – HTC’s much-anticipated first Android tablet is up for grabs at Best Buy stores across the U.S. right now. You can pick one of the Wi-Fi only tablets up (note: no stylus included) for a mere $500. A stylus will costs you $80 (yikes), should you so desire one. But consider yourself warned – the Flyer doesn’t support handwriting recognition at this point in time, though you could still presumably do all sorts of fun artsy things with it.

How do we know it’s on sale? Our man on the street (or in the building, rather),…

Official Android Police t-shirts are now on sale, with over 25 designs to call yours. Discount coupons also available.

Done With This Post? You Might Also Like These:

Confirmed: HTC Flyer On Sale At (Some) Best Buy Stores Right Now was written by the awesome team at Android Police.


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HTC Flyer Unboxing And First Impressions [Video]

The HTC Flyer comes just after a slew of recent Android tablets including the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1, Motorola XOOM, and the ASUS Eee Pad Transformer. But what makes this 7-inch tablet stand out is its compatibility with a digital stylus for convenient note-taking. Chris Davies from our sister site SlashGear has gotten his hands on it and brings us now the unboxing and his first impressions.

Although these days it seems the stylus, Davies finds that it does help set the HTC Flyer apart from the slew of near-identical Honeycomb tablets. The stylus shows promise and the digital ink flows smoothly despite the tablet’s 1.5GHz single-core Snapdragon processor. The tablet is also full of neat features such as Evernote integration with its handwriting recognition, a twin set of fascia buttons that rotate automatically for portrait or landscape orientation, and a sturdy paperback-sized chassis.

However, he notes that the HTC Flyer unfortunately still runs Android Gingerbread instead of Honeycomb, which could prove to be a problem for the device should updates to Honeycomb not pan out, although they are in the works. The absence of a holder for the digital stylus as well as broader app support for using the stylus are other negative elements. He will be doing a full review soon at SlashGear, so stay tuned. You can read his full first impressions here.

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