Posts Tagged Inventor

MSI Mobile Workstation with NVIDIA® Quadro K2000M Graphics Processor Now Available

Text

 

MSI Mobile Workstation with NVIDIA® Quadro K2000M Graphics Processor Now Available

 

CES 2013 is upon us. MSI is getting a jump on the crowds, however, by introducing a new mobile workstation prior to the show officially opening its doors. Starting now, MSI is making its Quadro Workstation laptop available, with NVIDIA® Quadro K2000M GPU powering things on the graphics front. Obviously, this one’s meant more for professionals than average consumers, but players in the enterprise space might want to take note.

navada

 

Designed to tackle the most challenging applications, the Quadro WorkStation builds on the acclaimed capabilities of the GT60 to deliver unmatched performance for professionals, including scientist, programmers, engineers, graphic designers and more.  The Quadro Workstation supports more than 150 professional applications, including Adobe CS6, Avid Media Composer, Autodesk Inventor, Siemens NX and PTC Creo.

 

Designed to tackle the most challenging applications, the Quadro WorkStation builds on the acclaimed capabilities of the GT60 to deliver unmatched performance for professionals, including scientist, programmers, engineers, graphic designers and more.  The Quadro Workstation supports more than 150 professional applications, including Adobe CS6, Avid Media Composer, Autodesk Inventor, Siemens NX and PTC Creo.

“MSI has long been heralded for their performance gaming laptops, and the Quadro Workstation leverages that expertise to deliver the same quality and effectiveness for professionals,” stated Andy Tung, vice president of sales for MSI US.  “Our laptops now offer the necessary power to handle the most demanding games and are capable of blazing through the most intense working sessions.”

“The MSI GT60-0NG platform, with the NVIDIA Quadro K2000M, is the ideal form factor for CAD and DCC professionals that need the flexibility to be mobile, yet still need the proven reliability and stability of a workstation-class solution,” said Shawn Worsell, product line manager at NVIDIA.  “Mobile Workstations enable explorers, designers and artists to unleash their creativity anywhere, and everywhere they go.”

The Quadro Workstation features state-of-the-art components including Intel® Core i7 Quad Core processors, Killer™ Intelligent Networking with high-performance Gigabit Ethernet for HD video and high-quality audio, backlit keyboard, premium speakers, and Cooler Boost to instantly optimize system temperatures and more.  It possesses all the advantages of the NVIDIA® Quadro K2000M graphic processor, with additional features such as:

  • Multiple Display Support – Multi-task with ease with up to 4 independent displays, including the native display (notebook display)
  • sRGB Standard – Delivers consistent, stable and vibrant colors at all ranges to enables perfect color rendering without any loss of fidelity
  • NVIDIA® Scalable Geometry Engine – Dramatically improves geometry performance across applications and enables the user to work interactively with large scale complex models and scenes
  • Fast 3D Texture Transfer – Fast transfer and manipulation of 3D textures resulting in more interactive visualization of large volumetric datasets
  • Hardware 3D Window Clipping – Hardware accelerated clip regions which improve overall graphics performance by increasing transfer speed between color buffer and frame buffer
  • 16K Texture and Render Processing – Ability to texture and render surfaces up to 16K x 16K, particularly beneficial for applications that demand the highest resolution and quality image processing.
  • OpenGL Quad Buffered Stereo Support – Provides a smooth and immersive 3D stereo experience for professional design applications

The Quadro Workstation is currently available for $2,099.99 at Newegg and Amazon.  For more information on the Quadro Workstation or MSI’s entire family of mobile solutions, visit http://www.msimobile.com

Quadro Workstation Full Specs

, , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

[New App] Autodesk’s ForceEffect For Android Brings Realistic Mechanical Simulation To Your Mobile Device

thumb

When the terms architectural, engineering, and construction are mentioned regarding design software, one name comes to mind: AutoDesk. They company has made available some pretty amazing software for Android, like AutoCAD, SketchBook, Inventor Publisher, and Design Review. Now, it has released its popular three-dimensional engineering software ForceEffect to the Play Store.

1 2 3

ForceEffect offers some very nice features:

  • Freehand sketching of elements and construction lines with snaps, constraints, and inferencing
  • Object dimensioning, global scaling, units, constraints
  • Import image as background
  • Create joints (welded, pinned)
  • Break element at joints
  • Create supports (fixed, grounded, sliding)
  • Create loads (known, unknown, distributed) and moments
  • Add weight to individual elements
  • Compute reaction forces and moments for equilibrium and over-constrained systems
  • Toggle forces to show force vector components
  • Results reporting with picture, results, all equations
  • Save and load files from Autodesk 360
  • In app tutorials

Best of all, it’s completely free, so even if it looks like something you’d just like to play with, you’re not spending a penny to give it a shot.

Official Android Police t-shirts are now on sale, with over 25 designs to call yours.

Done With This Post? You Might Also Like These:

[New App] Autodesk’s ForceEffect For Android Brings Realistic Mechanical Simulation To Your Mobile Device was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Book Giveaway #15: Win One Of Ten Copies Of "Android Apps With App Inventor," Easily Build Apps Like A Pro, Profit

2012-03-14 08h45_50Those of you from the early days of Android may remember App Inventor – a Google project that allowed people to create apps for Android by dragging and dropping bits of code – no programming experience required. More recently, Google transferred the App Inventor to MIT, where it was open sourced. But the App Inventor (AI) is still a bit tricky to just open and jump right in to – a proper guide through the AI would allow someone to utilize its full potential, and create more complex apps in less time.

Luckily, our friends at InformIT have such …

Official Android Police t-shirts are now on sale, with over 25 designs to call yours.

Done With This Post? You Might Also Like These:

Book Giveaway #15: Win One Of Ten Copies Of "Android Apps With App Inventor," Easily Build Apps Like A Pro, Profit was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

We heard you like apps: AIDE builds Android apps on Android

There’s a lot of tools out there to help aspiring developers get started on a new Android app, not the least of which is the newly-resurrected App Inventor from MIT. Now would-be app makers have a new option, specially suited to those whose skills or inclination tend towards Java: AIDE. The free app stands for “Android Integrated Design Environment”, and is a full-fledged Java IDE contained within an Android app.

Speaking basically, AIDE is a series of pre-compiled code sections combined with a text editor, compiler and tester. Putt all those functions together and you get A contained system for editing and creating Android apps. You can even compile the APK files right on your phone, literally crating an app with another app. This sort of thing happens all the time with more season desktop operating systems, but to my knowledge, it’s a first on a mobile platform.

It’s not quite as simple as the App Inventor: you’ll need basic Java skills to create anything more complicated than a test app. For those who need it, AIDE is compatible with the Eclipse IDE, and it admirably adjusts its interface for smartphones and tablets. Amazingly, the developers are giving away the app for free. Download it form the  Android Market here.


, , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

New App Inventor Beta Released By MIT

Google Labs was responsible for some of the apps we can’t live without on our devices: Google Search, Google Goggles and my personal favorite, App Inventor. Unfortunately the app was phased out, along with Google Labs, but not before the source code was made open for all. Of course, since App Inventor was a pivotal educational tool, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology picked it up right where Google left it.

I bring some good news today, as the beta version of the application is available to anyone with a Google account! That’s right, anyone can pick up and go create their own apps in a versatile, innovative and naturally intuitive environment. Anyone who’s ever wanted to give app development a shot but didn’t quite understand the jargon involved with software development should head over to the MIT’s App Inventor website (source link below) and give it a go.

source: mit


, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

MIT picks up where Google left off, launches Android App Inventor beta

This image has no alt text

Though the doors have been shuttered on Google Labs, one project near and dear to Android lovers lives on. Google open-sourced the code to App Inventor, a software tool that allows even those without much coding experience to create Android applications and games, and the brainiacs at MIT ran with it, releasing the first beta of MIT App Inventor.

MIT’s version picks up where Google left off, and unlike the initial closed release the program saw when it first hit the scene the new edition is open to all with a Google account. This of course means MIT’s servers have been hit pretty hard this morning with download requests, making access to the beta a bit difficult. It’s a shame that App Inventor lost official Google support, but it’s now in more than capable hands. Let’s see what apps you guys can come up with.

[MIT via SuperTechBlog]


, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

MIT revives the Android App Inventor

If you’ve got a great idea for an Android app but are somewhat lacking in the coding skills requires to create one, Google’s Android App Inventor is a great way to get your hands dirty. At least it was, until Google pulled the plug on the service last year, giving registered users time to download their projects before hand. In a fit of charity, they posted the open source code for the web and desktop software to let anyone host and run their own clone of the service – a challenge which the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has heartily embraced.

Prospective inventors can hop over to MIT to try the revived App Inventor. It even uses your familiar Google login to authenticate, though of course any projects previously stored on Google’s servers are long gone. It’s a great idea for a technology institution to impliment for its students, but making it open for everyone is a downright public service – good on ya, Beavers.

If you’re unfamiliar with the App Inventor, it allows users to create self-contained APK files with a “what you see is what you get” interface, creating a (relatively) user-friendly way to make basic applications. Completed apps can even be posted to the Android Market. Built-in API calls allow even novices to implement advanced behaviors using available hardware, though the possibilities are nowhere near as complex or optimized as native development.

[via Phandroid]


, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

The XDA Android Hacker’s Toolkit is Available for Preorder

Jason Tyler, author of Google App Inventor for Android, has a new book on its way and you can pre-order it today. It’s titled, XDA’s Android Hacker’s Toolkit: The Complete Guide to Rooting, ROMs and Theming. For those of you ready to start hacking, but aren’t sure where to start, the XDA developer’s forum has long been a great resource. Tyler’s book presents it in a more easily approached manner, beginning with the basics. 

“Providing a solid understanding of the internal workings of the Android operating system, this book walks you through the terminology and functions of the android operating system from the major nodes of the file system to basic OS operations.”

Expect to learn a wealth of information, including some of these hot topics:

  • Teaches theory, preparation and practice, and understanding of the OS
  • Explains the distinction between ROMing and theming
  • Provides step-by-step instructions for Droid, Xoom, Galaxy Tab, LG Optimus, and more
  • Identifies the right tools for various jobs
  • Contains new models enabling you to root and customize your phone
  • Offers incomparable information that has been tried and tested by the amazing XDA community of hackers, gadgeteers, and technicians
The book is available for pre-order from Barnes & Noble as well as Amazon for $22.39. Even for the experienced Android owners, this one will be a good addition to your library, when your friends come asking for help. Expect a formal release around May 1st, 2012.


, , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

The Week in Android News

Android Central

Phew. Another week complete and we all made it through with our sanity (well ok, some of it atleast). Odds are that over the course of the past week you missed something that happened, so check out below some of the highlights and be sure to keep yourself up to date.

General News

Hardware News

Tablet News

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

MIT and Google open-source App Inventor code, public release of MIT’s version on track for April

MIT

You guys probably know this by now, but I was a fan of App Inventor.  Watching my wife use it to create her own application just sucked me in, and I loved the whole idea of a way for anyone to make an Android app.  When we heard that Google was shutting it down, I was sad, but the news that MIT was going to pick up the pieces and run with it lifted my spirits again.  Recent news makes me even happier — MIT and Google have released the full source-code for the service, and folks at MIT's Center for Mobile Learning have said that the public release of the re-vamped service is on track for an April release:

So far (knock on wood) our development effort is on track for releasing the MIT Public App Inventor Service in the first quarter of this year. While unexpected issues can always arise, we're guardedly optimistic that people who plan to run App Inventor courses or workshops can anticipate being able to use the MIT service by mid-April.

With the release of the source and the JAR files you have the choice of running your own local copy, or jumping in and using MIT's version once it goes live.  See the links below for more information, and remember us if you give it a try and come up with your own app — we'd love to check it out!

Source: MIT's App Inventor Developer's blog

App Inventor source code

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

App Inventor opens its source and doors at its new home at MIT

Toward the middle of last year we found out that Google would be shutting the doors on its Google Labs department. While all of this news was somewhat sad, it also left those that took on their own projects via Google App Inventor worried that all the time they spent learning, reading and creating their own apps would have been for nothing. During the final countdown of the ultimate closure of App Inventor we found out that MIT wanted to take over the project and keep the services alive. Those of you that were already signed up and using App Inventor no doubt received the same emails I did on how to download your projects from Google for future use. If you didn’t snag your files, you are not completely out of luck. Check you Google Docs section, you should have a zip file in there from Google containing your projects to download. While not everyone’s projects survived, they are estimating that 95% of them did.

Now that the doors of Google App Inventor are officially closed, MIT has taken the reins and has recently made the code for the project open source for the community and world to tinker with. The news pretty much stops there for now though. There is very little in the way of documentation and support for the service currently. They haven;t set up their servers yet, so you have no where officially to upload your modifications. It is still a big process and large undertaking. MIT wants to get everything set up and working flawlessly before they open up the servers to the public. We can respect that.

The most recent update from MIT slates the service to be up and running in Q1. They have a beta service available for you to get in, but you need to fill out the request form and they will grant you access as soon as they can. Much like when App Inventor first launched.

If you are eager to keep up to date with App Inventor and its new home at MIT, be sure to keep an eye on their news at  appinventoredu.mit.edu.

Source: MIT via Androidpolice

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

App Inventor Gets Open Source Treatment Thanks To MIT

Inventors and app developers are about to get an early Christmas present courtesy of MIT. The WYSIWYG app building tool is back thanks to MIT and with this, received a donation from none other than Google to create the MIT Center for Mobile Learning. One of the first items on its agenda was to resurrect the infamous App Inventor— you know the landmark app creator tool that was sadly shut down by Google. MIT has followed through with the resurrection of the app and has released the initial source code to the masses. In addition, they with occasionally update the source code to match what it is doing in-house.

Don’t expect to hear about too much detail about the source code for now. MIT does not have much documentation of the source code at this time as they are focusing their resources on getting a large-scale public server up by April. However, there’s an ever-growing community already started which likely includes information for those wanting to get up and running today.

Interested folks ready to jump in and try out the source code can go ahead and register at the MIT link below. If you don’t hear an immediate resposne from MIT, know that it’s likely because they already have a long list of interested users and perhaps don’t want to overload the service— especially because it’s in its infancy. Is anyone else excited about the idea of users being able to create the next big app again? Sound off in the Comments section and let us know what you think.

 


, , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

App Inventor Goes Open Source At Its New MIT Home

AppInvBlueLooks like we missed it, but back in December of 2011, Google officially stopped developing App Inventor (it was a result of the company’s shutdown of Google Labs), allowing MIT to take the reins of a very similar project. Today, that project went open source, and though there’s very little in the way of documentation or guides, you can download the code now and begin modifying the Inventor.

Additionally, MIT hasn’t yet opened its servers, so you’ll have to find your own place to upload your modified version(s) of the file – but hey, if nothing else, at least …

Official Android Police t-shirts are now on sale, with over 25 designs to call yours.

Done With This Post? You Might Also Like These:

App Inventor Goes Open Source At Its New MIT Home was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

iPhone Screen Protector Provides Tactile Feedback for the Feel of a ‘Real Keyboard’

Textaholic? This new screen protector promises less typos and more typing. To inventor, Ruddy Ugarte, it seemed that the only thing wrong with the iPhone since its debut was the lack of an actual keyboard.Mr. Ugarte has always been passionate about the iPhone but nevertheless continues to have typos, sending at times embarrassing typo filled messages. ”Its both, the lack of a physical keyboard and that God forsaken autocorrect that at times causes those embarrassing or awkward text messages.” says, Mr. UgarteRecognizing this, Mr. Ugarte teamed up with his business partner, Joaquin A. to create a screen protector that doubles as a keyboard in a sleek transparent manner.  (more…)

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Android App Inventor deadline fast approaching, pull your apps Now

When Google first launched the Android App Inventor web development program, we sat in front of our PC’s eagerly waiting for the approval email to pop into our in boxes. The idea was rather remarkable, but still lacked in some departments. The overall concept was to give even the novice of developers a tool to create apps of their own and share them. It worked well, but I don’t think it took off as much as Google had hoped for. It got a little boost when some talented people go into the book and training side of how to use the program effectively. Even that saw a lack luster boost in sales as well as users on the system.

For those of you that used it or still want to, the site its self will officially go dark on the 31st of December. Which is right around the corner. Google has been sending out reminders to every registered user via email for the last couple of months We thought it would be a good idea to toss out one more reminder that your time is running short.

Even though the Google side of the App Inventor project is dying off, that doesn’t mean the whole thing is dead. In 2012 there will be a collaboration with Google and MIT to release a free and open-sourced software program that will help continue the legacy and the dreams of many. Educators and experienced programmers alike are encouraged to check out and track the progress of the collaboration at MIT’s App Inventor Edu site.

If you haven’t popped back into your account to download your projects yet, you might want to get on that. You only have a few days left before all that hard work gets wiped from the face of the earth.

, , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Don’t forget to download App Inventor projects before Dec. 31

App Inventor code download

Google's App Inventor is dead, long live MIT's App Inventor!

A final notice everyone — if you have some projects sitting around in App Inventor, and would like to keep them, either for some crazy time-capsule experiment or in the hopes of migrating them to MIT's App Inventor project, you've only got a handful of days left.  Come December 31, Google will be taking the whole kit and caboodle offline, and projects that haven't been downloaded are lost forever.

Getting them is easy, just log into appinventorbeta.com and hit the "Download All Projects" button as shown above.  Keep them safe, and when MIT gets things back up and running in 2012, you're ready to go.  For more information about MIT's implementation, have a look at their Learning Center.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

iZac Becomes The First Android-Powered Bartender – Fun, Ingenious, And Open-Source

image

You might remember this video, which cropped up earlier this month, showing off an Android-powered contraption that mixed drinks automatically. Well, it would appear that the device, lovingly named iZac, (after a barbot from the popular show Futurama) has made its official debut, mixing real cocktails for patrons at the Creative Sandbox in Sydney.

Right now, iZac can handle dispensing up to six liquids, and the Android interface includes an "I’m Feeling Lucky" option, which ostensibly creates a totally random concoction for those feeling bold.

izac-futurama 2011 - 1

While iZac already looks fantastic, it…

Official Android Police t-shirts are now on sale, with over 25 designs to call yours.

Done With This Post? You Might Also Like These:

iZac Becomes The First Android-Powered Bartender – Fun, Ingenious, And Open-Source was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Google Will Close App Inventor

If you recall (even I don’t), long-long time ago we were talking about the App Inventor from Google. This service was giving you a possibility to create Android based applications. And while it sounds like an easy tool to work with, trust me – it is not. Anyway, this was just a matter of time and now Google reminds users of its expiring App Inventor. You still have a bit more than a month to create an app or two until Dec. 31, 2011 but starting 2012 the project will be closed. If you haven’t received your email or would like to get know more about it – full text after the break.

Dear App Inventor User,

As we announced on the App Inventor Announcement Forum, Google will end support for App Inventor on December 31, 2011, after which data in appinventorbeta.com will not be accessible and will be deleted from Google servers.  You can preserve your App Inventor projects by simply clicking on the Download All Projects button on your My Projects page.  This will download to your computer a zipped archive of all your projects.  We recommend you retrieve your projects well before December 31st.

By the end of 2011 Google will also be making the complete App Inventor source code publicly available under an open source license, so that anyone can study the code and modify it as they desire.

In order to ensure the future success of App Inventor, Google has funded the establishment of a Center for Mobile Learning at the MIT Media Lab.  Sometime in the first quarter of 2012, the Center plans to provide an App Inventor service for general public access, similar to the one Google is currently running.

In order for you to continue working with your projects in an open source instance (MIT or otherwise) of App Inventor you will need to download your data from appinventorbeta.com before December 31st and later upload them to an open source instance as it becomes available.

Please visit the App Inventor user forums to get future updates on App Inventor.  You can also visit http://mobilelearning.mit.edu/ for updates on what is being done with App Inventor at MIT.

The App Inventor Team

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Google reminds up App Inventor shutting down at end of year, download your projects now

App Inventor

Google overnight sent out e-mails reminding users of its expiring App Inventor that it will no longer support the project on Dec. 31, 2011. As you'll recall, App Inventor was a tool that allowed anyone with arguably no programming skills to create Android apps, though it certainly wasn't quite as easy as that sounds. Google's shutting things down but open-sourcing the project to MIT, and you can migrate your projects over if you want to keep them. Head to App Inventor and hit the "Download all projects" button and you'll get a handy zip file.

Full text of the e-mail's after the break.

read more

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

U.S. Patent System to get overhaul, Unfortunately not enough

The U.S. patent system will get its first major overhaul in 60 years. The senate voted 89-9 in approval of the America Invents Act, and President Obama said in his speech last night, “Today you passed reform that will speed up the outdated patent process so that entrepreneurs can turn a new idea into a new business as quickly as possible. That’s the kind of action we need.”

The goal is for streamlining the patent process, reduce costly legal battles, and provide the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office the funding it needs to process patent applications faster.

The United States is switching from the “first-to-invent” system to the “first-inventor-to-file” system which puts us in line with other industrialized countries.

Small investors are concerned as they feel they will now be at a disadvantage with big corporations. Supporters are concerned with costly lawsuits in which companies are arguing and trying to prove who the first inventor is.

Read More…

U.S. Patent System to get overhaul, Unfortunately not enough


, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Syncuz Introduces Real-time, Location-based Event Planning App for Android [Video]

Have you ever tried to organize a social or business event and ended up pulling your hair out trying to coordinate where and when to meet up? Would real-time location-based event planning make it easier to schedule that business meeting, a movie with friends, or finding skiing buddies on the slopes? If the answer is yes, Syncuz, the first map-based messaging app for both iPhone and Android might be for you.

Syncuz enables groups to synchronize without calling or texting. To create an event, place the event’s location on the Syncuz map, and invite contacts to be part of that event-specific group. If your invites have Syncuz as well, they can join the event with each event member represented by a pin on the map showing real-time location. A member can also attach messages to their pins that the whole group will be able to see.

The applications private and secure location-based messaging environment allows members to control how much information they share. According to the inventor of Syncuz:

“Privacy is at the heart of the Syncuz service,” explained Syncuz inventor Nick Francis, who is currently working on a number of mapping projects. “Syncuz is the only iPhone or Android app that enables users to see what is happening — and where it’s happening — on a single screen and to respond accordingly. With Syncuz real-time location-based messaging, only those involved in a given event are visible to the members of the event group. To make it easier to organize an event the ‘invitation’ is automatically created by the app; you simply have to add the guest from your contact list then send the invitations, which contain a link to download the app if the guest hasn’t already done so.”

Read More…

Syncuz Introduces Real-time, Location-based Event Planning App for Android [Video]


, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

App Inventor gets a new take on life thanks to MIT

Last week we heard the news that Google’s Android App Inventor was to be shut down. Speculation is that this is due in part to newly appointed CEO Larry Page’s desire to focus the company’s efforts. Of note, App Inventor isn’t the only product affected by this. The entirety of Google Labs is also “being phased out”. This is a significant loss for Android, as the Labs were directly responsible for mobile products we love like Google Goggles, Gesture Search, and Sky Map. What innovative new products might we now miss out on? Luckily the products mentioned above will continue to exist, but other Android Lab projects like BreadCrumb won’t be so lucky. It seemed at first as if App Inventor was also on that “do not recuscitate” list. Thankfully, however, Google announced that they would open source the project to whoever was willing to pick it up. Enter MIT. MIT has come up with a new Center for Mobile Learning to be housed in the famed MIT Media Lab. There, an open-sourced App Inventor will begin again in the hands of its original creator Hal Abelson as well as fellow MIT professors Eric Klopfer and Mitchel Resnick. By this partnership, App Inventor will likely be re-released under a dual Google/MIT license.   Read More…

App Inventor gets a new take on life thanks to MIT


, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

App Inventor Kind-of Sort-of Being Kept Alive By Google Thanks to MIT Center Funding

This image has no alt text

We were saddened to hear news that Google’s App Inventor, what you could describe as a “WYSIWYG” app creator, would cease to be developed by Google. It wouldn’t completely disappear as Google agreed to open source the project in order to allow third parties to come in and continue work on it if they wanted.

That first third party appears to be the MIT Center for Mobile Learning, a special institute devoted to educating people on the booming mobile application development market and helping them get into mobile development.

How Google’s involved? They initially funded the new learning center, meaning they’re helping to keep the lights on, meaning App Inventor – in some way, shape or form – will live.

Google is in the process of open-sourcing the App Inventor code. As part of its research, the new Media Lab center will be engaged in studying and extending App Inventor, connecting App Inventor to MIT’s premiere research in educational technology and MIT’s historic track record of open software innovation.

Thankfully, all signs point to them letting everyone in on whatever they’ll be doing instead of keeping it for in-house use only. We still don’t know when exactly Google will release the App Inventor source, but they promised to retire the project by the end of the year, meaning we should see source code sometime within the next 4-5 months.


, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

MIT launches new Mobile Learning Center, extending App Inventor its first activity

MIT

With initial funding from Google, MIT has opened their Center for Mobile Learning, dedicated "to transforming education and learning through innovation in mobile computing."  The function of the new center will be to focus on new mobile technology and applications that allow people to study and learn from anywhere.  Scheduled research projects include things like location aware learning apps, mobile data collection, augmented reality, and other educational uses of mobile technologies.  It looks like an excellent use of funding, and MIT has always been a cornerstone of open-source development and innovation. 

What’s really cool is that one of the center’s first activities will be how they can extend and integrate App Inventor for Android to MIT’s research in educational technology.  Google may have ended App Inventor, but they are in the process of open-sourcing the entire project and things like this are the reason why.  Dr. Hal Abelson, one of the three co-directors of the new center, is one of the gentlemen credited with prompting the development of App Inventor while he was on sabbatical and working at Google in 2008.  It’s great to see that his ideas and innovation will continue, and that the project hasn’t died.

Source: MIT


, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Android Central Podcast Ep. 67

Podcast MP3 URL: 
http://traffic.libsyn.com/androidcentral/acpc67.mp3

Thing 1 – HTC’s ‘marriage’ to Beats Entertainment

Thing 2 – Ice Cream Sandwich leak

Thing 3 – Farewell, Google App Inventor

Sponsor

Thanks to hover.com for sponsoring this episode of the Android Central Podcast.


, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Tonight, on the Greatest Android Podcast in the world

HTC’s big news, Ice Cream Sandwich, and so long, App Inventor

Android Central Podcast

Thursday, again? Sho’ nuff! And that means it’s time for the Greatest Android Podcast in the World! On tap tonight: We’ll talk about HTC’s "major news announcement" that turned out to be a partnership/stake in Beats Entertainment, the Ice Cream Sandwich leak, and the demise of Google’s Android App Inventor.

So join Phil and the gang — and, of course, the chat room — live tonight at 9 p.m. EST / 6 p.m. PST for the live broadcast. You should be there. You will be there. You must be there. After all, you are what makes it the Greatest Android Podcast in the World.

Not at a computer? Pick up the free UStream Viewer from the Android Market [link] and search for Android Central a little before the show (it won’t appear until we go live). We’ll see you there! AndroidCentral.com/live


, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Autodesk Brings SketchBook Pro To Honeycomb, Artistic Abilities Not Included

hi-512-2

Autodesk is one of the many devs out there that consistently impress me with its high-quality, well-made apps – especially when it comes to Honeycomb. The newest app out of Autodesk’s camp, SketchBook Pro, meets – and perhaps surpasses – all of the standards that have been set in my mind for quality development.

ss-1280-2-2 ss-1280-3-2 ss-1280-4-2

SketchBook Pro is a drawing app designed with the professional in mind – and it appears to be quite full-featured. It’s designed to be used with a stylus or with your finger, depending on what type of look you’re going for. …

Official Android Police t-shirts are now on sale, with over 25 designs to call yours. Discount coupons also available.

Done With This Post? You Might Also Like These:

Autodesk Brings SketchBook Pro To Honeycomb, Artistic Abilities Not Included was written by the awesome team at Android Police.


, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Autodesk Releases Inventor Publisher Viewer To The Android Market

hi-256-0-fe45f8aa1d1deab495e4ca160ec67755be397916

If you’re familiar with Autodesk’s Inventor Publisher software, then you know what a Godsend it can be for creating and viewing rich, three-dimensional instructions. Up until now, it has been lacking on thing, though – what if you’re not at at PC when you need to view said instructions? Suddenly, the benefits of Inventor Publisher were not as glorious. That has all changed now, though, as Autodesk has released an Inventor Publisher Viewer app into the Android Market.

Like its name suggests, the viewer allows you to use instructions created in Inventor Publisher on your Android…

Official Android Police t-shirts are now on sale, with over 25 designs to call yours. Discount coupons also available.

Done With This Post? You Might Also Like These:

Autodesk Releases Inventor Publisher Viewer To The Android Market was written by the awesome team at Android Police.


, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Build Your Own RSS/Atom Feed App, it’s as Easy as 1,2,3.

When Android launched, everyone that knew anything about coding got to work to bring us apps. Then along came tutorials, training classes and online groups to help others learn to create apps too. After that was the launch of  App Inventor from Google. That helped more people get started in building their very own personal apps that they could share with their friends. As we continue to move forward in advancements, things get easier and easier for the self proclaimed NOOB to make something on their own. App.Yet just stepped the game up to make getting your favorite site feeds built in a matter of seconds.

Often times we spend hours setting up feeds to FeedDemon or Google reader. A great handful of the more popular sites have their own apps for you to download that will give you feeds and other various access to the site through your device. But what about those obscure sites that you visit? What about a specific forum page you want to follow but hate digging into the site to get to what you want? That is where App.Yet comes in.

App.Yet is a web based application builder that lets you quickly and easily build your feed app. When you first go to the site you will want to set up your free account. Then click on ‘Sample Apps’ at the top right of the screen. Name your app, it creates a package name for you or you can change it, then add the feed URL. Once you are done there, click ‘Create App’. Now you choose an icon image and add or remove podcast access. Once you have it all done you can download the app and install it straight to your device.

But wait there’s more!! If you have a developer account set up with Google, you can post the app in the market. Generate money through Admob Publisher revenue or simply sell it if you wish. If that still isn’t enough for you, you can select custom build and contact the App.Yet developer team. You provide the budget, the type of app you are looking for and what you want it to do and they will get back to you with in 24 hours to discuss the project. It really couldn’t be any easier.

All the apps you create stay saved in your App.Yet account for downloading later if want. You also will be able to edit the image and add or remove RSS/ATOM feeds and redo the app at any time.

If you are ready to get started in creating your very own simple apps, head on over to App.Yet and get your free account started. Let us know how it went and if feel like sharing your app with everyone post a link in the comments. I did a very quick and simple app o just the main AndroidSPIN feed to test it out. You can pick it up through this LINK.

Happy app building!

 

 

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments