Posts Tagged LightSquared

LightSquared pitches new plans to FCC in attempt to end GPS interference hex

LightSquared files new plans to the FCC, hopes to cast off GPS interference hex

If you thought filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy was the final chapter in LightSquared‘s wireless network saga, you’d be wrong. Hedge-fund manager Philip Falcone is back at the FCC‘s doorstep with yet another proposal, which he hopes might snatch the maligned network from the jaws of GPS interference-related troubles. Two filings placed with the commission apparently outline plans to use its broadband network in a way that it believes won’t interfere with GPS signals, along with the 5MHz of spectrum that are known not to cause any issues. Along with the proposed changes, LightSquared is reportedly set to ask for more time to have exclusive rights to propose a reorganization plan. If granted, this could finally mean some progress for the beleaguered project, but with investors worried that money being spent on this could be better-placed back in their pockets, Falcone will have everything crossed, while the FCC deliberates the situation.

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LightSquared pitches new plans to FCC in attempt to end GPS interference hex originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 30 Sep 2012 05:04:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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LightSquared officially files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy

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As expected, May 14th is indeed a dark day for LightSquared. The company has just filed paperwork in order to initiate Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings in Manhattan’s US Bankruptcy Court, effectively killing its dream of providing a high-speed mobile wireless network to upwards of 260 million people. Not quite a year after Sprint and LightSquared put together an agreement that would ensure 15 years of blissful LTE enjoyment together, Philip Falcone’s baby looks weaker than ever. With the Sprint tie-up now void, and over $1.6 billion in debt, there’s probably not too many places for LS to turn. The primary hurdle — one it never could seem to overcome — was the FCC’s outright refusal to believe any of the company’s mitigation proposals in relation to GPS interference issues. Despite “profoundly disagreeing” and raising all sorts of chaos in an effort to get its way, LightSquared never did manage to convince the powers that mattered. Where it turns from here is anyone’s guess, but it won’t be a quiet fall from grace, we’re surmising.

LightSquared officially files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 14 May 2012 14:24:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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WSJ: LightSquared ‘preparing’ for bankruptcy protection filing, final decision coming tomorrow

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Can’t say it’s striking us as any sort of surprise, but the seemingly destined-to-fail LightSquared just might be out of options. After getting a high-five from Sprint and plenty of attention for its initiatives in bringing yet another wireless option to America, those blasted GPS interference issues (or “supposed” issues, depending on who you ask) eventually became too much to overcome. According to a breaking report out of The Wall Street Journal, Philip Falcone’s venture is seriously teetering on the edge of bankruptcy, as “negotiations with lenders to avoid a potential default faltered,” according to the ever-present “people familiar with the matter.” Purportedly, the two sides have until 5PM tomorrow to strike a deal that’ll keep the firm out of bankruptcy court (if you’ll recall, it owes over $1.6 billion dollars to various entities), but given just how far apart these sides remain, its fate seems all but sealed. We’ll be keeping an ear to the ground for more, but don’t go placing bets on yet another debt-term violation waiver.

WSJ: LightSquared ‘preparing’ for bankruptcy protection filing, final decision coming tomorrow originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 13 May 2012 11:11:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Carl Icahn unloads his LightSquared debt, creditor talks trudge on

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Carl Icahn is no stranger in this field — he’s been caught tussling with Motorola and bidding Yahoo’s board adieu in recent years — and most recently, he’s managed to get caught up in one of the bigger wireless whirlwinds this planet has ever seen. Just months after Icahn swooped in to buy some $250 million in company debt at around 40 cents on the dollar, he has managed to offload that very chunk for 60 cents on the dollar. Not surprisingly, his cash coffers are growing in turn, despite LightSquared’s position as a whole looking only marginally less bleak. According to a Reuters report, creditors have agreed to another week-long extension (until May 14th) in order to talk things over with head honcho Philip Falcone. As of now, the startup has around $1.6 billion in debt, and while talks may delay the pain, we’re still not getting the impression that the FCC (or anyone else, really) is warming to its propositions. Then again, maybe Facebook can just buy it in an act of charity prior to its IPO.

Carl Icahn unloads his LightSquared debt, creditor talks trudge on originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 09 May 2012 03:11:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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RIM continues the executive shuffle with new COO and CMO

Changes are afoot at Research in Motion. The Canadian smartphone maker today announced the addition of two new names to top executive slots. Former Sony Mobile Communications executive VP Kristian Tear will be taking on the role of the company’s chief operating officer. RIM’s new chief marketing officer Frank Boulben, meanwhile, comes over from Lightsquared, after having worked for the likes of Vodafone, Vivendi and Orange. The news comes on the heels of word that new CEO Thorsten Heins has been “clearing house” at the ailing phone company.

RIM continues the executive shuffle with new COO and CMO originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 08 May 2012 09:49:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Sprint Signs Contract With WSCA That Nets The Carrier $2B Over Four Years

SprintSprint’s money troubles are no secret to anyone. After losing out on the Lightsquared deal, not to mention the decreased revenue from the iPhone deal (which should pay off in the long run), Sprint has had trouble making ends meet in the short term. Thanks to a new deal signed with the Western States Contract Alliance (WSCA), Sprint will receive $2bn in revenue over the next four years in exchange for its wireless services. Big customer.

It’s not enough to offset the absolute thrashing that Sprint’s finances have taken recently. When the carrier is taking losses a billion dollars in one quarter, two billion over 16 of them seems like a drop in the bucket.

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LightSquared founder Philip Falcone to step down ‘eventually’, attempts to dodge the bankruptcy bullet

In an effort keep the troubled LightSquared from the brink of defaulting on its debt, its founder will step down from the company. While it doesn’t look immediate, (people “familiar with the negotiations” are using the word “eventually”) it’s Philip Falcone’s latest attempt to extend a debt-term violation that expires this morning. According to the same sources, if the initial extension is okayed, Falcone and LightSquared’s lenders are aiming for a greater period of around 18 months to repay $1.6 billion in loans and pass the FCC’s requirements for its network. The company’s board is still deliberating on whether to accept the deal, which would stop the company filing for bankruptcy protection. Unfortunately, it looks like those new 4G network dreams just got hazier.

LightSquared founder Philip Falcone to step down ‘eventually’, attempts to dodge the bankruptcy bullet originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 30 Apr 2012 06:56:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Sprint Parts Ways With LightSquared, Returns $65 Million

Sprint and LightSquared had entered into an 11-year agreement last June to share network expansion costs if LightSquared could get regulatory approval for its LTE rollout plan. LightSquared was debating with the FCC about alleged GPS interference on the 1.6 GHz spectrum, and Sprint had given them a six-week deadline to sort it all out. Well, the six weeks is now up, and Sprint has decided to terminate the agreement, saying the following:

“…due to these unresolved issues, and subject to the provisions of the agreement, Sprint has elected to exercise its right to terminate the agreement announced last summer. We remain open to considering future spectrum hosting agreements with LightSquared, should they resolve these interference issues, as well as other interested spectrum holders…

…Per the terms of the agreement, Sprint has returned $65 million in prepayments LightSquared made to cover costs that were not ultimately incurred by Sprint.”

Full press release after the break.

Sprint Elects to Terminate Spectrum Hosting Agreement with LightSquared

OVERLAND PARK, Kan. (BUSINESS WIRE), March 16, 2012 – Sprint (NYSE: S) today issued the following statement regarding the spectrum hosting agreement it signed with LightSquared in June 2011. Per the agreement, Sprint agreed to deploy and operate an LTE network capable of utilizing the 1.6 GHz spectrum licensed to or available to LightSquared. The agreement contained contingencies related to possible interference issues with LightSquared’s spectrum, including Sprint’s right to terminate the agreement if certain conditions were not met by LightSquared.

“Sprint has been and continues to be supportive of LightSquared’s business plans and appreciates the company’s efforts to find a resolution to the interference issues impacting its ability to offer service on the 1.6 GHz spectrum. However, due to these unresolved issues, and subject to the provisions of the agreement, Sprint has elected to exercise its right to terminate the agreement announced last summer. We remain open to considering future spectrum hosting agreements with LightSquared, should they resolve these interference issues, as well as other interested spectrum holders.

“Late last year, both companies agreed to halt deployment design and implementation of LightSquared’s network to ensure that Sprint’s Network Vision project remained on schedule. While unfortunate, termination of the agreement will have no impact on Sprint’s current customers and is not material to Sprint’s ongoing business operations. Network Vision remains on schedule and on budget, and we look forward to begin launching our 4G LTE network mid-year.

“Per the terms of the agreement, Sprint has returned $65 million in prepayments LightSquared made to cover costs that were not ultimately incurred by Sprint.”


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Sprint and LightSquared Are Not Together Anymore

Couples get together, couples get separated… it is a normal flow of life when two get together or say “Goodbye” and go separate ways. Sprint and LightSquared did their best to become that strong and good-looking but things didn’t work out and now they are officially divorced: Sprint remains with its ambitions and LightSquared goes away with $65 million back in its pockets – money that Sprint had already accepted as prepayment for costs that were never realized. Here’s Sprint’s latest comment: “Sprint has been and continues to be supportive of LightSquared’s business plans and appreciates the company’s efforts to find a resolution to the interference issues impacting its ability to offer service on the 1.6 GHz spectrum. However, due to these unresolved issues, and subject to the provisions of the agreement, Sprint has elected to exercise its right to terminate the agreement announced last summer. We remain open to considering future spectrum hosting agreements with LightSquared, should they resolve these interference issues, as well as other interested spectrum holders. Late last year, both companies agreed to halt deployment design and implementation of LightSquared’s network to ensure that Sprint’s Network Vision project remained on schedule. While unfortunate, termination of the agreement will have no impact on Sprint’s current customers and is not material to Sprint’s ongoing business operations. Network Vision remains on schedule and on budget, and we look forward to begin launching our 4G LTE network mid-year. Per the terms of the agreement, Sprint has returned $65 million in prepayments LightSquared made to cover costs that were not ultimately incurred by Sprint.”

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Sprint to LightSquared: it’s over

The writing’s been on the wall for a few weeks and now Sprint’s officially severing its partnership with LightSquared. Philip Falcone’s project had a contractual deadline of March 15th to gain regulatory approval for its LTE service on the 1.6GHz spectrum, which was shot down by the FCC in February. A day later, Big Yellow exercised its right to pull the plug, paying back $65 million in prepayments and continuing to build out a LTE network on its own. Nextel’s better half didn’t slam the door shut entirely, however. If, by some miracle (and it would be a big one), the company can change Julius Genachowski’s mind, it’d certainly consider teaming up again, so no hard feelings, eh?

For its part, LightSquared has issued a formal response, saying that the contract termination is in “the best interests of both parties” and “not unexpected given the regulatory delays.” On the upside, the company has had its coffers swelled by a not inconsiderable $65 million, which is the first good news it’s had for a while.

Continue reading Sprint to LightSquared: it’s over

Sprint to LightSquared: it’s over originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 16 Mar 2012 09:56:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Sprint’s divorce from LightSquared is final, returns $65 million

 

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And that, as they say, is that. Sprint this morning announced that its spectrum deal with LightSquared is officially over, and the two companies will go their separate ways. LightSquared's going away with $65 million back in its pockets — money that Sprint had already accepted as prepayment for costs that were never realized.

Said Sprint in a news release:

“Sprint has been and continues to be supportive of LightSquared’s business plans and appreciates the company’s efforts to find a resolution to the interference issues impacting its ability to offer service on the 1.6 GHz spectrum. However, due to these unresolved issues, and subject to the provisions of the agreement, Sprint has elected to exercise its right to terminate the agreement announced last summer. We remain open to considering future spectrum hosting agreements with LightSquared, should they resolve these interference issues, as well as other interested spectrum holders.

“Late last year, both companies agreed to halt deployment design and implementation of LightSquared’s network to ensure that Sprint’s Network Vision project remained on schedule. While unfortunate, termination of the agreement will have no impact on Sprint’s current customers and is not material to Sprint’s ongoing business operations. Network Vision remains on schedule and on budget, and we look forward to begin launching our 4G LTE network mid-year.

“Per the terms of the agreement, Sprint has returned $65 million in prepayments LightSquared made to cover costs that were not ultimately incurred by Sprint.”

So what does this mean to you? Really, not all that much. Sprint's still planning on rolling out its LTE network by the middle of the year, and that can't come soon enough for those of us waiting on another option for the Samsung Galaxy Nexus (which just went through the FCC). It just won't be doing so with LightSquared.

Source: Sprint

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Sprint Ends LTE Agreement With Lightsquared, Says Its Network Vision Plan Is Still ‘On Schedule’

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Back in July of ’11, Sprint entered into an agreement with Lightsquared to provide 4G LTE to its network on the 1.6GHz spectrum. Lightsqaured was given until March 15, 2012 to work out the potential kinks (mostly dealing with GPS interference) but was unable to deliver on this deadline. As such, The Now Network had to call it quits.

Sprint has been and continues to be supportive of LightSquared’s business plans and appreciates the company’s efforts to find a resolution to the interference issues impacting its ability to offer service on the 1.6 GHz spectrum. However, due to these unresolved

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Android Overload: Sprint To End $65 Million Deal With LightSquared, MyTouch 4G And Slide 4G Receiving OTA Update and More

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Greetings, my fine Phandroid friends. It’s almost the end of the week! Today, we brought you a ton of Android news but in case you needed a little bit more… we’ve stock piled the ones that we didn’t feature on our front page, here — in the Android Overload. Enjoy.

  • Ex-Google employee says Google+ focus ruined the company. [MyFox8]
  • Sprint is about to end their deal with LightSquared and take back $65 million. [WSJ]
  • T-Mobile myTouch 4G and Mytouch 4G Slide to receive maintenance update. [TMoNews]
  • Go Launcher HD is now available for tablets. [Google Play Link]
  • Scramble with Friends now available for Android. [Google Play Link]
  • ASUS provides instructions for installing Android 4.0 on your netbook. [ASUS Campus Life]
  • Google being investigated by the FTC over privacy concerns. [WSJ]


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Sprint kicks LightSquared to the curb as it contests FCC ruling

Sprint Kicks LightSquared to the curb as it contests FCC ruling

Sometimes when you start heading downhill, it can be hard to stop. Take LightSquared for instance — not only were its LTE plans repeatedly contested and eventually shot down, but now Sprint, its long time partner, will be cutting ties with the wireless start-up. According to the Wall Street Journal, the move will officially be announced on Friday, leaving LightSquared alone with its dreams. A representative from the start-up says its filing a 150-page defense of its network on the same day, hoping to refute the Feds’ claims that its network interferes with GPS signals. The outfit made no comment on Sprint’s plans, but mentioned that it has enough funds to operate on its own for several quarters. We’ll let you know when Sprint officially drops the ball.

Sprint kicks LightSquared to the curb as it contests FCC ruling originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 15 Mar 2012 20:02:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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CricKet Leaps To Clearwire After LightSquared Failure

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The failure of LightSquared could go down in history as one of the worst failures in mobile industry history. The Northern Virginia satellite company had a gigantic master plan to roll out a wholesale LTE network over frequencies that used to be used for government and military GPS.

Time and time again LightSquared went back to the drawing board, and then back to the FCC to rid their network of interference still affecting GPS used today. Earlier this year the FCC ruled that LightSquared would never be able to fix the interference.  Immediately following LightSquared laid off more than half of their workforce and their CEO resigned.

LightSquared had already inked wholesale customers. Among them were a multi billion.dollar deal with Sprint, as well as a deal with Leap Wireless to cover over 2/3 of their current CricKet customer base with LTE.

More after the break

In a need release today, San Diego based Leap Wireless announced that they too would be turning to Clearwire, to fill the void from the failed LightSquared deal.

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.  Leap said it will use Clearwire’s forthcoming TD-LTE network to subsidize their own LTE build out.

Clearwire plans to have 5,000 advanced LTE stations deployed across the U.S. By June 2013.  The advanced LTE network that Clearwire is building out, is supposed to get theoretic speeds of up to 100mbps, trumping the,speeds of both AT&T and Verizon’s LTE networks.

“The high-speed 4G LTE networks we are deploying will complement our robust 3G network and allow us to continue innovating value for our Cricket customers,” said Doug Hutcheson, President and CEO of Leap Wireless International, Inc., Cricket’s parent company.  ”We believe this agreement with Clearwire provides us with an attractive option to supplement our own LTE build-out strategy and gives us the flexibility to access additional 4G capacity where needed as data-centric devices continue to become more popular.”

While this may be great need for both Leap and Clearwire, Seattle based Clearwire is still in a cash crunch. Clearwire, which was founded by wireless pioneer Craig O McCaw, just raised $1 billion dollars for network build out, which largely came from Sprint. Clearwire had almost gone broke prior to.the most recent cash infusion. Clearwire has already said they may need to raise more money after 2012 to continue network deployment.

Source: Clearwire via FierceWireless

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Report: Sprint planning to dump Lightsquared as early as next week

According to Bloomberg, Sprint is considering pulling the plug on its partnership with Lightsquared as early as next week. Philip Falcone’s burgeoning enterprise was subject to a March 15th deadline to gain approval for a nationwide LTE network, but that was shot down by the FCC last month. The company’s been treading water ever since and whilst it remains optimistic that a workaround can be found, it’s already ousted former CEO Sanjiv Ahuja, fired 45 percent of its staff and defaulted on a $56 million payment to Inmarsat. The same report claims that Nokia Siemens Networks, the infrastructure arm of the handset maker has suspended network building projects until further notice. The split would cost Sprint around $74 million, but given the current state of affairs, that may look like a bargain.

Report: Sprint planning to dump Lightsquared as early as next week originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 07 Mar 2012 10:31:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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LightSquared CEO Sanjiv Ahuja steps down, company remains committed to wireless network

The shakeup continues at LightSquared. Just days after the would-be LTE wholesaler confirmed that it would be cutting its staff by 45 percent, it’s now announced that CEO Sanjiv Ahuja has resigned from his position, although he will continue to serve as chairman of the board. Chief network officer Doug Smitand and chief financial officer Marc Montagner will serve as co-chief operating officers as the company searches for a new CEO. What’s more, LightSquared has also announced that billionaire backer Philip A. Falcone has been appointed to the company’s board of directors, and he himself has reiterated the company’s intent to build out its wireless network, noting that it is “committed to working with the appropriate entities to find a solution to the recent regulatory issues.” The company’s official announcement can be found after the break.

Continue reading LightSquared CEO Sanjiv Ahuja steps down, company remains committed to wireless network

LightSquared CEO Sanjiv Ahuja steps down, company remains committed to wireless network originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 28 Feb 2012 12:59:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Google Backs Out Of Clearwire, Liquidates Holding For 47 Million

Back in 2008 as Clearwire was emerging as the new 4G platform, Google invested over half a billion dollars in the Craig McCaw backed start up for 6.5% of the company.

As we’ve seen over the last four years, things at Clearwire didn’t go according to plan.  They constantly shuffled executives and couldn’t hit their mark for service roll out. WiMax was also quickly proven to not be as fast, nor efficient as the upcoming 4G/LTE (Long Term Evolution).

More after the break

It appeared in 2010 that Clearwire may have been starting a turn around. They finished their 2010 rollout plans according to schedule however, abruptly at the end of 2010 funds dried up and not a single new market was added for Clearwire’s WiMax footprint. Not only that but Clearwire’s stagnation meant that Sprint’s 4G footprint didn’t expand either.

2011 didn’t look good for Clearwire. Many had started to write WiMax off altogether. In fact Sprint had signed a deal with Lightsquared to build out their own 4G/LTE network. Luckily for Clearwire Lightsquared didn’t seem to have their act together. Lightsquared constantly said they would fix interference problems their network had with government and military GPS but as we all know the FCC found that, that feat was impossible for the Northern Virginia based network company with no network.

Lucky for Sprint, and in turn Clearwire, Sprint had an out for the LightSquared deal and they should walk away pretty much unscathed. Sprint pledged another $1 billion dollar bandaid for Clearwire so that they can work on rolling out their 4G/LTE Advanced network that reaches theoretic speeds of 100mbps down.

Google apparently wants no part of that. Google has already proven they are ready to get into the mobile hardware business with their purchase of Motorola Mobility. They are also testing their own high speed network in Kansas City. Perhaps they want to roll out their own network as well.

Of course they could have just decided to stop the bleeding. Today, Google’s 6.5% stake in Clearwire is worth $47 million dollars, under 10% of what they paid nearly four years ago.

source: TheVerge

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Lights Dimming On Light Squared

Around this time last year, nobody seemed to be able to stop Light Squared. The Reston VA based satellite company was going to roll out a 4G/LTE network come hell or high water. Well it looks like both have swooped down on Lightsquared in the last two weeks.

LightSquared had signed a multi billion dollar deal with Sprint to help the nation’s third largest carrier roll out 4G/LTE. Luckily for Sprint that deal was contingent on LightSquared overcoming an obstacle with the FCC. The spectrum LightSquared intended to use for their 4G/LTE network is spectrum used for military and airline GPS.

Continue Reading After The Break

The FCC granted LightSquared multiple temporary licenses to get their 4G/LTE technology to stop interfering with those GPS devices. Time and time again LightSquared took to the media and their own blog to report that they were about to solve the problem, or that the problem was not theirs to solve.

Last week this came to a head with the FCC when the FCC revoked their temporary license and rules that LightSquared would never be able to eliminate the interference to the GPS systems.

That decision by the FCC has just about completely halted LightSquared’s plans for a 4G/LTE network. While Sprint has given LightSquared until next month to get their network working, at this point, that’s a pipe dream.

Today LightSquared made their first of most likely several painful announcements. The company said today that they are laying off 45% of it’s 330 employee workforce.

LightSquared described the layoffs as:

“prudent and necessary cost savings measure to ensure the long-term success of the company.”

To top that off, Monday LightSquared defaulted on $56 million dollar payment on a note held by British satellite partner Inmarsat.

While bankruptcy seems inevitable LightSquared continues to say they won’t file for bankruptcy, of course they repeatedly said they would eliminate that interference and get a 4G/LTE network deployed…

source: Reuters

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LightSquared Lays Off 45% After Defaulting on $56 Million Loan

Virginia-based LightSquared Inc. plans to lay off 45% of its 330 employees after failing to pay back a $56 million loan to British satellite partner Inmarsat, the company said on Tuesday. LightSquared spent $2.5 million on lobbyists trying to solidify the FCC’s temporary permission to move ahead with their wireless network, but was dealt a severe blow last week when the FCC revoked their permission, citing interference concerns with military and airline GPS systems. To avoid the interference, LightSquared requested that the FCC require stricter GPS spectrum usage, but the FCC rejected that request.

Sprint, who previously struck a partnership deal with LightSquared to roll out LTE to Sprint’s customers, gave the company a deadline to complete their network build-out by March of this year. With the FCC’s decision blocking them from continuing to roll out their service, coupled with their financial troubles, it seems unlikely that the company will be able to meet Sprint’s deadline, essentially killing the deal and possibly delaying Sprint’s LTE plans.

Hedge fund manager Philip Falcone, LightSquared’s main backer, said that bankruptcy was not an option. The company issued this statement:

The company remains committed to managing its core business operations, serving the more than 300,000 government, public safety and commercial users of its satellite service.

Falcone’s $4 billion Harbinger Capital Partners Fund has 60% of its assets in LightSquared, and last year lost 47% after the value of its investments in the company’s equity dropped. Due to this, investors in Falcone’s fund may be considering bankruptcy, regardless of Falcone’s statement. If LightSquared does end up declaring bankruptcy, they open themselves up for the likes of Carl Icahn, a “takeover artist” who invests in company debts when their value drops so he can have a controlling interest in the company’s restructuring after bankruptcy is declared. Debt holders are the first in line to receive payments from asset sales, whereas stockholders are last, making debt investment a lucrative business.

There’s still hope, however, since LightSquared was only going to provide Sprint with their 1600MHz band, but Sprint was also going to use its own 1900MHz band for LTE as well.  Sprint has previously declared that they would still pursue an LTE roll-out regardless of their partnership with LightSquared. We have to wonder, however, if this whole mess will delay Sprint’s schedule… and more importantly, the launch of the Sprint Galaxy Nexus.

source: reuters
via: phonearena 


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LightSquared to cut staff by 45 percent as troubles grow

Yet another bit of bad news to add to the pile for LightSquared — the company announced this week that it will be cutting back on its employment numbers by 45 percent. The cost cutting move comes a day after word got out that it had defaulted on a hefty $56.25 million payment. According to reports, the Virginia-based company, which currently employs some 330 people, is apparently not looking into bankruptcy, in spite of its mounting troubles.

LightSquared to cut staff by 45 percent as troubles grow originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 21 Feb 2012 17:42:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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LightSquared’s troubles continue, company defaults on $56M payment to Inmarsat

It’s been a while since LightSquared had some good news to boast about, and it doesn’t look like that situation’s about to change anytime soon. The latest stumble for the company stems from its 2007 agreement with UK-based satellite operator and spectrum owner Inmarsat, which was due a $56.25 million payment from LightSquared that it has now defaulted on. For its part, LightSquared is laying some of the blame on Inmarsat, saying that it has “raised several matters that require resolution” before the first phase of the agreement comes to a close, and that “the terms of the agreement allow for additional time to resolve pending questions before phase one is complete and the final payment is due.” This comes as the company faces a brick wall in the form of the FCC, which it has been struggling to get approval from and has recently been criticizing in increasingly blunt terms. Its full statement on the Inmarsat matter can be found after the break.

Continue reading LightSquared’s troubles continue, company defaults on $56M payment to Inmarsat

LightSquared’s troubles continue, company defaults on $56M payment to Inmarsat originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 20 Feb 2012 13:21:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Android Overload: Sprint Could Be Out $65 Million If LightSquared Deal Doesn’t Pass, HP Says Android Could Become Closed Source and More

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The Android Overload is up and poppin’ tonight. Well, mostly due in part to a ton of new app updates (mostly bug-fixes) and we didn’t feel they deserved a post on our front page. But we stashed them here, for you to take a look at — along with all the other stories that didn’t make the cut today. Some of them, you’ll find, are pretty good too. If you do see something you like, be sure to let us know.

  • The Sony Ericsson Xperia smartphone family received four iF Design awards. [Sony Ericsson]
  • Gigabyte has introduced the GSmart G1355, an entry-level dual-SIM Gingerbread handset with a 4.3-inch screen. [GSMArena]
  • Adobe Flash updated for improved Android 4.0 support, bug fixes. [Market Link]
  • Facebook updated in the Android Market with bug fixes. [Market Link]
  • Google Maps updated with mostly bug fixes. [Market Link]
  • New teaser trailer for Dark Legends. [YouTube]
  • AT&T is on the prowl for more spectrum. Negotiating with Leap Wireless. [IntoMobile]
  • Campaign to fund custom laser etched Galaxy Nexus battery covers hits goal. [IndieGoGo]
  • HP’s CEO says Android could become closed-source now that they’ve acquired Motorola. [Electronista]
  • Why Google didn’t build search, plus your body. [RWW]
  • Sprint could have to pay back $65 million if LightSquared deal doesn’t go through. [TheVerge]
  • Time Warner wants to bring streaming television to Android 4.0 devices by March. [Twitter]
  • Apple’s lawsuit against Samsung includes 17 Android devices. [Electronista]


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LightSquared Network Application Facing Rejection Due To GPS Interference

It appears that the LightSquared saga is one giant step closer to coming to an end. After recently requesting that the FCC become stricter on its GPS device standards, it’s reported that the FCC will be rejecting the company’s network application — inhibiting its ability to become a wholesale LTE network provider. This is all after the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) sent a letter to the FCC stating “LightSquared’s proposed mobile broadband network will impact GPS services and that there is no practical way to mitigate the potential interference at this time”, which directly contradicts the FCC’s conditions for approval of the application that LightSquared not in any way interfere with any other signal spectrum.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t stop there. On top of the billions of dollars and heaps of resources put into the LightSquared project, this will most definitely be putting LightSquared’s ability to comply with Sprint’s recent ultimatum. However the company doesn’t quite want to take no for an answer, and went on record stating that they disagree with the NTIA’s decision, and will remain committed to finding a resolution.

source: the wall street journal


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GPS To LightSquared: Wherever Possible, Make A Legal U-Turn

Lightsquared as a satellite company based in the Washington DC suburbs of Reston VA. Lightsquared was founded in 1988 by Philip Falcone and Sanjiv Ahuja and is responsible for launching satellites MSAT-1 and MSAT-2 in the mid 90′s.

In 2009 it was announced that Lightsquared was going to start offering wholesale 4G/LTE services and widely thought, because of previous relationships, that Sprint/Nextel would become a customer of theirs. In 2011 it was announced that Sprint would indeed partner with LightSquared for their expansion into 4G/LTE.

More after the break
The problem though, was the fact that Lightsquared has no scalable network up yet.  Lightsquared has a test network in place that continually has interference with GPS satellites. Lightsquared was built on frequencies that were originally allocated to military GPS.  Those frequrencies lay very close to commercial GPS and Lightsqured’s 4G/LTE network is interfering with those consumer GPS units.

Through most of 2011 and throughout all of 2012 to date, Lightsquared has been operating on conditional permission from the FCC. During that time Lightsquared was advised to come up wiht a solution to rid their network of GPS interference.

A significant ruling came yesterday as the NTIA, which governs military and government radio experience, said that Lightsquared would inevitably interfere with other devices including GPS.

“NTIA … has now concluded that there is no practical way to mitigate potential interference at this time,” the FCC said in a statement. “Consequently, the commission will not lift the prohibition on LightSquared.”

The FCC went on to say: “The commission clearly stated from the outset that harmful interference to GPS would not be permitted,”

Back in June it was revealed that Sprint and Lightsquared had entered into a 15 year deal that could be valued as high as $20 billion dollars. Luckily that deal had a contingency plan in case something, like this decision by the NTIA, and FCC, were to arise.

Sprint didn’t stop there though. They also secured a back up plan in a decision to reinvest in Clearwire which is working on it’s own 4G/LTE Advanced network. It’s that network which is currently being built out by Sprint, set to debut mid year.

source: AllthingsD

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FCC to dash LightSquared’s bid for LTE glory

Many of us have seen this coming for some time now, but the FCC issued a statement late today that it intends to reject LightSquared’s bid to create a wholesale LTE network on the basis that interference with existing GPS devices is unavoidable. The news follows a similar recommendation from the NTIA that was delivered to FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski today, which concluded “there are no mitigation strategies that both solve the interference issues and provide LightSquared with an adequate commercial network deployment.” For its part, the upstart wireless provider responded that it “profoundly disagrees” with the NTIA’s conclusions and remains committed to finding a solution — easier said than done. You’ll find that statement in its entirety after the break.

Continue reading FCC to dash LightSquared’s bid for LTE glory

FCC to dash LightSquared’s bid for LTE glory originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 14 Feb 2012 20:37:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceWSJ, NTIA (PDF)  | Email this | Comments

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LightSquared Now Asking FCC Impose Tighter GPS Standards To Get 4G LTE Network Off The Ground

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LightSquared has been fighting what seems like an uphill battle from start to get their budding 4G LTE network off the ground. Their biggest hurdle? Getting the darn thing to stop interfering with government protected GPS bands. While, in the beginning, LightSquared was trying to convince the FCC that there was no interference (this was one of the terms required to get their network to gain approval), now the company is back peddling, issuing a statement calling out the FCC to change the way GPS receivers operate because, you know — although there’s no interference, if there was, it’s because of poorly designed GPS equipment. LightSquared said in a statement,

“If sensible standards were in place, the GPS industry would not be facing the current interference problems and consumers would benefit from a more efficient use of spectrum. Furthermore, the way would be clear for LightSquared to launch its new nationwide wireless broadband network funded by a $14 billion private investment in the nation’s broadband infrastructure.”

Now, I agree, something should be done about GPS receivers operating sloppily on L-band spectrum, but something tells me that would take a little more time than LightSquared is hoping to rush. When it comes to GPS manufacturers, LightSquared is asking the FCC to formally establish that they have no right to “interference protection” from LightSquared’s network. Something tells me this isn’t going to go over so well.

LightSquared is grasping at straws here, trying every trick in the book to get their LTE network up and running and remember — if they can’t get everything squared away by March, they could lose valuable funding from Sprint, one of their primary investors.

[GigaOM | Via Electronista]


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LightSquared gets desperate, seeks regulatory changes to satisfy GPS debacle

LightSquared gets desperate, seeks regulatory changes to satisfy GPS debacle

If we were the betting type — and hell, some of us really are — we’d wager a crisp ten spot that LightSquared isn’t going to assuage the FCC’s concerns over those pesky GPS interference issues in the next few weeks. After previously stating that the interference test reports were rigged by GPS insiders, the upstart LTE network is now getting political with its argument and is calling on the FCC to institute new standards for GPS equipment. LightSquared contends that current GPS devices on the market are poorly designed and purposefully encroach on the company’s licensed spectrum. Of course, this change would do little to remedy the millions of interference prone / (causing?) devices on the market, but LightSquared notes that, by the FCC’s own admission, GPS receivers must “reasonably discriminate against the reception of signals outside their allocated spectrum.” With the company’s latest argument flying high atop the flagpole, it begs the question, will anybody salute? You’ll find LightSquared’s statement in its entirety after the break.

Continue reading LightSquared gets desperate, seeks regulatory changes to satisfy GPS debacle

LightSquared gets desperate, seeks regulatory changes to satisfy GPS debacle originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 07 Feb 2012 21:46:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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LightSquared Requesting the FCC Require Stricter GPS Device Standards

LightSquared, the company which has spent billions of dollars developing a whole-sale only wireless broadband network, filed a document with the FCC regarding stricter standards of GPS devices. LightSquared believes that signals that are used as part of GPS bands are the culprit of interference on the spectrum that they’ve chose to use for their services. Originally, that spectrum was supposed to be a satellite-only type of deal, but the FCC cleared it for terrestrial use back in 2005. The FCC also granted the company a waiver so LightSquared could run a terrestrial-only network.

Now, due to Sprint delivering an ultimatum, LightSquared is pressed for time in achieving a resolution for all these interference issues. Losing a long-term multi-billion dollar deal like the one struck with Sprint could be potentially catastrophic for LightSquared, especially when you couple it with LightSquared’s largest investor, Harbinger Capital Partners, who last year reported a whopping 46.6 percent value loss. Although the potential of LightSquared can be valued quite high in my opinion, it seems that if it can’t strike a deal with the FCC, we might be seeing a little more sinking than swimming.

Source: CNET


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Sprint Gives LightSquared 6 Weeks To Make Right With The FCC And Begin Delivering 4G LTE For 2015

Sprint and LightSquared were all set on their venture to begin delivering 4G LTE to Sprint’s customer base however, there’s one small stepping stone.  And by small, I mean huge as heck.  The FCC has presented quite the challenge in a number of areas for LightSquared primarily in regards to an alleged GPS interference issue.  The entire ordeal has moved to the FCC inquiring public approval before moving forward.  However, Sprint isn’t allowing the matter to linger any longer than it needs to. The carrier would still like to use LightSquared to assist in rolling out 4G LTE speeds to its customers however, they’ve given the company a deadline of six weeks to straighten matters out before they look elsewhere for services.  The folks over at BGR managed to get a statement from LightSquared:

“Sprint and LightSquared have agreed to extend our network agreement through mid March. Sprint continues to support our business plan to bring wireless broadband to more than 260 million Americans and our ongoing efforts to work with regulatory agencies to resolve interference concerns.”

So, stay tuned to Talk Android as we see if LightSquared can reconcile things with the FCC by mid March.  Im sure there is a plethora of Sprint customers that would love to see 4G LTE speeds on their network, 260 million to be exact.

source: Down Jones Newswires
via:  Phandroid

 

 


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