Posts Tagged manufacturing

Motorola’s Texas manufacturing unit to be closed down by the end of the year

Motorola Fort Worth

Google opened the Fort Worth, Texas unit for Motorola last year for the Moto X. It is now being heard that this unit will be shut down by the end of the year as they hand over the reins of the company to Lenovo. This manufacturing unit employs 700 workers currently and will mean bad news for the “Made in the USA” tag which was Motorola’s USP during the Moto X launch last year.

The Motorola CEO, Rick Osterloh has said that the decision to sell the unit in Texas was taken independently and doesn’t have anything to do with the Lenovo acquisition. The main factor responsible for the closure of this unit is said to be the faltering sales of the Moto X which reportedly didn’t meet expectations.

The primary reason behind having a manufacturing plant in the U.S. was to expedite production meant for the American consumers. But considering the relatively high labor and shipping costs in the country compared to regions like China, this idea wasn’t feasible in the long run. At its peak, the unit employed over 3,800 employees with most of them contracted out of Flextronics International Ltd.

Source: WSJ

Via: 9to5Google

The post Motorola’s Texas manufacturing unit to be closed down by the end of the year appeared first on The Droid Guy.

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Sapphire to be incorporated into manufacturing of flagship smartphones in 2014

HTC Onea

Sapphire isn’t just for jewelry, folks. HTC and LG could begin using sapphire in its smartphones’ home buttons to implement fingerprint scanning devices into their 2014 flagship devices— these devices are of course the HTC One 2, and the LG G3.

There isn’t much more information regarding the fingerprint scanners, but we do know they will be there— the only hope is that they’ll be a tad bit better than the scanner on the latest iPhone.

Source: DigiTimes

Come comment on this article: Sapphire to be incorporated into manufacturing of flagship smartphones in 2014

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Apple reportedly spending $10.5 billion to upgrade its manufacturing ahead of new product launches

When you’re a company with $147 billion in cash lying around, why wouldn’t you spend it on robots and lasers? According to a Bloomberg report, Apple is investing about $10.5 billion in newer manufacturing equipment, possibly in preparation for those new product lines we’ve been hearing so much …

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Get a peek inside the Moto X manufacturing unit through Street View

Moto X Fort Worth

Motorola has just made its factory at Fort Worth, Texas viewable for all thanks to Google Maps. Users can now get a peek inside the unit where every Moto X is manufactured, with a Street View tour. Motorola’s Made In the USA tag line for the Moto X has been heavily endorsed since the smartphone was unveiled and has opened up a lot of job opportunities for fellow Americans. The company, no doubt was taking a gamble by manufacturing the smartphone in the U.S. while the rest of the manufacturing industry has a set base in China due to the cheap labor.

It seems like Motorola’s courage has paid off as the smartphone is now reportedly selling over 100,000 units every week to customers, while customized AT&T Moto X smartphones take a bit longer to ship. But by giving us a brief look at what’s happening inside its manufacturing unit, Motorola wants us to know that the team is hard at work to ensure buyers get their Moto X in time. While the Woven White and Woven Black variants can be mass produced, the customized variants of the smartphone take relatively longer since they have to be hand assembled. Hit the link below to get a feel of what’s happening inside the Moto X manufacturing unit.

Street View Tour

Source: Motorola

Via: Android Community

The post Get a peek inside the Moto X manufacturing unit through Street View appeared first on The Droid Guy.

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LG to invest $655 million in display manufacturing

LG TV Displays

LG, even though not so successful in the Android smart phone market till now (hoping that the second line of Optimus L smart phones are a hit), is very big in manufacturing flat display panels for TVs. In fact, this South Korean manufacturer is the only company which manufactures organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) used in TVs. And the company is thinking of going even bigger in this sector.

The television industry is not going anywhere soon, with all the awesome TV shows and more importantly, the awesome smart TVs that all these companies are bringing to us. The Apple TV and the Google TV are an example of what technology will be able to do with the traditional industry of television.

The two companies have gone so far into the future, that just a cable connected to your flat screen television in the living room is not interesting enough. And with Apple holding an Apple TV based event later this year, we are sure to see more of the future of the industry. The Cupertino tech giant is expected to open a door for third party developers to develop apps for the Apple TV by releasing the Apple TV SDK.

So, with all this happening, there is no way that the market for televisions will go down. So LG, another major company in the industry, has decided to do its own investing. The company is going to invest 706 billion won, or $654.8 million, in a plant dedicate to the manufacturing of the next generation displays for the televisions of the future. There is no news about where the unit is going to be, but guess that it is going to be somewhere in China is not a bad beginning.

The South Korean display giant is going to start the work soon, and the manufacturing plant is said to go into work in the first half of the next year.

Source: Reuters

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Is HP Planning on Manufacturing an Android Tablet and Smartphone Sometime Soon?

Up until today, the only reason HP and Android would be in the same device is if you jumped on the TouchPad fire sale and hacked Android into the thing. However, The Verge and ReadWrite are reporting that HP and Android might be making things a bit more official. Citing multiple unnamed sources within the company, HP is working [...]

Click the post title to continue through and join the conversation!

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[CES 2013] Dacor Cooks Up Android 4.0.3-Powered Wall Oven With 7" Display, Google Play, $7499 Price Tag

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Back in 2011, Eric Schmidt (among others) predicted that Android would soon power home devices, including refrigerators and other appliances. Samsung fulfilled the refrigerator vision with the RF4289. We’ve questioned the wisdom of Android-powered appliances in the past, but today’s pre-CES announcement from Dacor is definitely worth talking about. The California-based company, known for manufacturing quality home appliances, has just announced an Android-powered in-wall oven.

That’s right – a (thirty inch) smart oven is on the way, and it’s powered by a seven-inch device (called the Discovery IQ controller) with Android … ahem … baked in. And guess what – it runs the Play Store.

Done With This Post? You Might Also Like These:

[CES 2013] Dacor Cooks Up Android 4.0.3-Powered Wall Oven With 7" Display, Google Play, $7499 Price Tag was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Sony stops shipping PlayStation 2 consoles

3777_PS2 fullOne of the most popular gaming consoles in the world has finally reached the end of its manufacturing days as Sony has finally decided to stop making the PlayStation 2.

Released in 2000, Sony’s PlayStation 2 console became so popular that it was only rivaled in sales by some types of portable consoles from Nintendo DS. Even years after the release of PlayStation 3, the PlayStation 2 continued to enjoy sales from stores around the world  until just lately.

According to a Japanese gaming website Famitsu, Sony has finally delivered the last shipment of brand new “PS2″ for the Japanese market. Other regions around the world will still be getting some shipment until the near term, but the legend that the PlayStation 2 has created has already been stopped.

The Japanese PlayStation 2 market has saw more game titles in Japanese language in contrast to their English counterparts. The PlayStation 2 is known for many amazing role-playing games like the MMORPG Final Fantasy XI, a game designed very closely around the maximum capabilities of the PS2 that even the Windows version of the game is virtually a copy of almost entirely the same  controller-based interface and graphics.

New games for PS2 are still being made though like Final Fantasy XI. FF XI is getting a retail-boxed, full-fledged expansion this coming March, but it is only supporting the PS2 in Japan, where many die-hard fans continue to use the original “fat” PS2 system. This version has a hard drive expansion slot. Final Fantasy XI will also be supporting PC and Xbox 360 versions sold internationally.

The current gaming console from Sony, the PlayStation 3, made famous by the silence Sony officials made during a Sony event where the console’s price was announced to be “599 US dollars”, was created to be backwards-compatible with many of the PlayStation 2 and PlayStation 1 games. Backwards-compatibility on PlayStation 3 was achieved by Sony  by incorporating the actual PS2 “Emotion Engine” and “Graphics Synthesizer” chips on the motherboard of every PS3, essentially making the PS3 a two game consoles in one (and also making the launch price higher).

After a redesign, Sony was able to lower the cost of the new PS3 some, but it also removed the essential Emotion Engine chip, which now caused to sometimes fail to play certain games or to cause some bugs during the game. The current stocks of PS3s no longer come with both chips, making them unable to play PS2 game discs although they still can play PS1 games without problems. Even upgrades can no longer make the new PS3s play PS2 games game discs at all.

Sony has also created a few HD remakes of particular PS2 games, publishing them to work for the PS3 under the “PlayStation 2 Classics” section. A few dozens of such games are available for download in the PlayStation Network store.

Downloading re-released games means that users will have to buy the game again (if it is available in the PS Network),  just like how PlayStation Portable gamers do for their Vita console. And buying the games again for the PlayStation 3 does not mean such games can be played indefinitely on upcoming Sony consoles. It is rumored that the next PlayStation console will not be playing some games designed for PS3s.

source: yahoo

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Apple Will Hand Over Manufacturing of A6X Chips To TSMC, Trial Production Will Begin This Quarter

tsmc-logo

Apple’s current line of A-series chips (A5, A5X, A6, A6X) are made by its arch rival in the industry, Samsung. Obviously, the company has been contemplating a switch in manufacturers for quite some time now. We previously reported that Apple had planned to seek TSMC’s (Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co) services to fulfill its requirements for the A-Series chips used in iOS devices. And now it seems like the speculations were indeed true as a report coming from Taiwanese daily Commercial Times states that Apple has struck a deal with TSMC to produce A6X chips which is used in the fourth gen Apple iPad. As of now, we’re only hearing reports of TSMC preparing A6X chips and there’s no info on whether the Taiwanese manufacturer will manufacture other Apple chips too. The said chip will go into trial production beginning from the first quarter of this year, so it could take a few more months for the companies to formally sign a pact.

This is a setback for Samsung as Apple is their top client accounting to millions of their revenue. The two companies have been fighting patent trials in courtrooms with one verdict ruling Samsung to pay in excess of $1 billion to Apple as a fine. So it was almost obvious that Apple was looking to move away from Samsung and look towards alternatives. The aforementioned trial production of the A6X chip by TSMC could break down if the company isn’t able to produce the required amount of chips in time, so all is not final yet. On the flipside, if TSMC is able to succeed in meeting Apple’s demands, we could see them making all future A-Series chips for iOS devices.

The main purpose behind switching to TSMC, other than getting out of Samsung’s partnership is that TSMC makes its chips using the 20nm technology. The Samsung made A6X chip is made using the 32nm process, so there will be substantial increase in performance. Whether TSMC will be able to manufacture the chips for a lesser amount is still not known. The Korean’s would lose a large chunk of their income with this deal falling off, but they should make up for that with increased sales of the next Galaxy flagship. Samsung plans on selling 510 million handsets in 2013. So if that estimate is anything to go by, we shouldn’t see Samsung having any problems with the proposed Apple-TSMC deal.

Source: Commercial Times
Via: 9to5Mac

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LG Optimus G is certified ‘Carbon-Free’

Optimus G

The LG Optimus G may not have received Jelly Bean just yet, but it did get certified as Carbon-Free from the CarbonFund Foundation. Along with other LG products, including refrigerators, washing machines, ovens and vacuum cleaners, the Optimus G was found to be environmentally friendly throughout the entire process of procuring raw materials, production, distribution, use, and disposal. This follows a trend LG started with the equally-green Optimus Elite.

We worry a lot about things like updates and market share, but as temporary users of this planet we should also care about the impact our hobby has on the environment. While any manufacturing process will leave some scars, it's refreshing to see companies try to be as gentle as possible on this blue marble. And don't forget we can do our own part by responsibly disposing of our tech toys when they have outlived their usefulness. Your carrier store or local Best Buy (among other retailers) will be happy to dispose of non-working electronics and send them off for recycling.

Kudos LG.

Source: LG (Korea)

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LG Display looks to take Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 off the market with ban

What, you thought Apple was the only problem Samsung had to deal with in the mobile realm? It looks like two South Korean companies will get ready to battle in court over display patents. LG Display is claiming Samsung’s Galaxy Note 10.1 infringes on display technology that makes it easier to view the tablet’s display at many different viewing angles.

The goal for LG Display is to get the tablet banned at all levels, including importation, retail and even manufacturing. While such a ban likely won’t phase Samsung it’s a strong first punch to throw at the manufacturer’s biggest slate. Samsung Display’s vice president — Shim Jaeboo — has already responded, saying LG Display’s claims are unjustified. He didn’t go into much detail as to how, but to release a statement so swiftly and boldly suggests Samsung has confidence that this case won’t go far.

Should LG get its way, it will also look to rake in around $933,000 per day for each day of “continued non-compliance.” We’re not sure if they’re counting the days since the tablet has been on sale as “non-compliance,” but in that case a bit of quick, dirty math tells me that would be about $130 million to date.

Samsung has been hit with much harder, of course, as they once faced a possible $1.1 billion penalty for its scuffle with Apple, though it looks as though Samsung will successfully ward that one off. That seems like pocket change for such a big electronics company that has been breaking sales records all year, but we’re sure they’d still hate to take the loss. We’ll keep half an eye on this one, folks.

[via Taipei Times]

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With such a successful 2012, Samsung plans on shipping 510 million handsets in 2013

It’s an understatement to say Samsung had a successful 2012. With their global success of the Galaxy S III and Galaxy Note 2 this past year, Samsung has fiercely placed themselves at the top of the totem pole when it comes to mobile device manufacturing. Thus, it’s widely expected that Samsung plans on moving forward and having an even better 2013. So far, even though Samsung’s Q4 totals aren’t made available just yet, the company is expected to hit around 410 million units shipped for this year. Due to this, reports are saying that Samsung is planning on upping the ante and shipping a whopping 510 million units for next year (a 20% incremental increase from this year).

Of those 510 million, Samsung plans on having about 390 million of that to be smartphones and the rest to be feature/budget phones. While there’s no breakdown on how many of that estimated number will be Android or Windows handsets, I’m sure we can all assume a huge bulk of that is Android. After all, Google’s Android OS has been Samsung’s proverbial cash cow for the past couple of years.

What are you guys specifically expecting from Samsung for 2013?

source: Korea Times 

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With such a successful 2012, Samsung plans on shipping 510 million handsets in 2013

It’s an understatement to say Samsung had a successful 2012. With their global success of the Galaxy S III and Galaxy Note 2 this past year, Samsung has fiercely placed themselves at the top of the totem pole when it comes to mobile device manufacturing. Thus, it’s widely expected that Samsung plans on moving forward and having an even better 2013. So far, even though Samsung’s Q4 totals aren’t made available just yet, the company is expected to hit around 410 million units shipped for this year. Due to this, reports are saying that Samsung is planning on upping the ante and shipping a whopping 510 million units for next year (a 20% incremental increase from this year).

Of those 510 million, Samsung plans on having about 390 million of that to be smartphones and the rest to be feature/budget phones. While there’s no breakdown on how many of that estimated number will be Android or Windows handsets, I’m sure we can all assume a huge bulk of that is Android. After all, Google’s Android OS has been Samsung’s proverbial cash cow for the past couple of years.

What are you guys specifically expecting from Samsung for 2013?

source: Korea Times 

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With such a successful 2012, Samsung plans on shipping 510 million handsets in 2013

It’s an understatement to say Samsung had a successful 2012. With their global success of the Galaxy S III and Galaxy Note 2 this past year, Samsung has fiercely placed themselves at the top of the totem pole when it comes to mobile device manufacturing. Thus, it’s widely expected that Samsung plans on moving forward and having an even better 2013. So far, even though Samsung’s Q4 totals aren’t made available just yet, the company is expected to hit around 410 million units shipped for this year. Due to this, reports are saying that Samsung is planning on upping the ante and shipping a whopping 510 million units for next year (a 20% incremental increase from this year).

Of those 510 million, Samsung plans on having about 390 million of that to be smartphones and the rest to be feature/budget phones. While there’s no breakdown on how many of that estimated number will be Android or Windows handsets, I’m sure we can all assume a huge bulk of that is Android. After all, Google’s Android OS has been Samsung’s proverbial cash cow for the past couple of years.

What are you guys specifically expecting from Samsung for 2013?

source: Korea Times 

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No Comments

With such a successful 2012, Samsung plans on shipping 510 million handsets in 2013

It’s an understatement to say Samsung had a successful 2012. With their global success of the Galaxy S III and Galaxy Note 2 this past year, Samsung has fiercely placed themselves at the top of the totem pole when it comes to mobile device manufacturing. Thus, it’s widely expected that Samsung plans on moving forward and having an even better 2013. So far, even though Samsung’s Q4 totals aren’t made available just yet, the company is expected to hit around 410 million units shipped for this year. Due to this, reports are saying that Samsung is planning on upping the ante and shipping a whopping 510 million units for next year (a 20% incremental increase from this year).

Of those 510 million, Samsung plans on having about 390 million of that to be smartphones and the rest to be feature/budget phones. While there’s no breakdown on how many of that estimated number will be Android or Windows handsets, I’m sure we can all assume a huge bulk of that is Android. After all, Google’s Android OS has been Samsung’s proverbial cash cow for the past couple of years.

What are you guys specifically expecting from Samsung for 2013?

source: Korea Times 

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LG Display is bringing Ultra HD TVs in multiple sizes, high res mobile screens and more to CES

LG Display is bringing Ultra HD TVs in 55, 65 and 84inch sizes to CES, high res mobile screens too

The manufacturing white label behind products from LG Electronics and many, many other companies, LG Display will have something new for us in Las Vegas as well. In a press release, the company announced it will show off Ultra HD (4K) panels in 55-, 65- and 84-inch sizes (shown above), complete with its FPR passive 3D tech built in. Since LG Display makes panels for quite a few of the HDTVs on shelves, it follows that we’ll be seeing actual products shipping in those sizes in the coming year from several brands. It also will show off its work in other areas, with a 30-inch 4K monitor, a 5.5-inch 1080p screen for smartphones, a 1,920 x 1,200 7-inch tablet display, and a new QSXGA (2,560 x 1,700) screen destined for laptops that packs all of those pixels into just 12.9-inches.

PPI isn’t everything however, and LG Display is bringing several displays notable for their tiny bezels as well, including a 23.8-inch monitor in its Neo-Blade Series, a 13.3-inch laptop screen with a 2mm bezel, and a 4.7-inch mobile screen with a 1mm thick bezel. Finally, the new year also brings tweaks to its OLED displays, which will show off an ultra light and thin design at just 3.5kg and 4mm thick — and hopefully actually being released in the US this year. Check out the release after the break for the full list of goodies, we’ll be getting our own look at them in just a few days.

Continue reading LG Display is bringing Ultra HD TVs in multiple sizes, high res mobile screens and more to CES

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A Rumor Revisited: Will Google open its Nexus line to multiple partners? I hope not.

A few months ago, before Google released its most recent Nexus phone, the LG Nexus 4, there were several substantial rumors floating around that Google was planning on opening its Nexus line to multiple manufacturing partners. It all started with a report from the very credible Wall Street Journal and the rumors went something like this: Google will offer its “Nexus” name and early access to the latest stock Android builds to any OEM who is willing to play by Google’s rules and build their phones with a minimum set of specs set by Google’s team. There was said to be five new Nexus phones from five different manufacturers (LG, HTC, Sony, Samsung, and Motorola) all released on November 5th (Android’s 5th birthday) and they’d each be sold in Google’s new Play Store. Sounds pretty plausible, right? Android had finally grown up as an operating system, and now it was time to get the pure Google experience on as many powerful flagship phones as possible, while bypassing the manufacturers ugly and unconventional skins. To be honest, when I first read this rumor I was beyond excited. I absolutely love stock Android (post Ice Cream Sandwich) and was salivating about the fact that I’d get to choose from several top of the line hardware variations for my next Nexus.

Well, the rumors didn’t pan out (not yet, at least). November came and Google released not five, but one solitary Nexus phone: the LG Nexus 4. The rumors of an HTC built Nexus 5 just never materialized, and today it seems that the dream of having multiple Nexus phones to choose from is long gone. It seems that Google has chosen its strategy: pick one manufacturing partner with the most cutting edge technology and lowest price points, then work closely with them to release the one successor Nexus phone per year. Some of you are still waiting, hoping, maybe even longing for Google to change its strategy and give us some choice by opening its Nexus program to multiple manufacturers, but I am no longer one of those people.

I believe Google would fail to deliver properly coded, smooth functioning, high quality software updates in a timely manner if it had to manage five separate Nexus phones. Google is having a hard enough time managing the devices it’s already got (let alone getting them launched right). This can be seen with the buggy Nexus 7 4.2 update that caused users’ devices to lag, stutter and chop themselves to oblivion. It can be seen by the fact that the entrepreneurial developers over on XDA can optimize Google’s code and get us better battery life than Google’s high paid Android engineers can (my Nexus 7 gets twice the battery life running when a CM 10.1 nightly ROM compared to the stock Android software). If Google is having trouble getting decent code out to these three different sized devices (the Nexus 4, Nexus 7, and Nexus 10), then how could we expect to get finished, polished, timely updates to 5, 10 or even 20 Nexus phones made by different manufacturers with different chip sets? No, I think Google has given up on that idea, and I for one am glad. The evidence that Google is overwhelmed with different devices to care for can be seen by the fact that they’ve recently cut off support for the Nexus S and Motorola Xoom. It seems that Google is struggling to keep up and do a good job. In this case, less is more.

I may be the minority among Android fanatics, but I’d rather have one Nexus device that works perfectly and gets quick updates, than have many phones to choose from that are all buggy, half-baked and slow to get updates. I am hoping that Google keeps its Nexus line “closed”.

What do you guys think? Would you rather have Google offer several Nexus phones at once? Or do you think it would mess things up and slow things down? Let us know in the comments!

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A Rumor Revisited: Will Google open its Nexus line to multiple partners? I hope not.

A few months ago, before Google released its most recent Nexus phone, the LG Nexus 4, there were several substantial rumors floating around that Google was planning on opening its Nexus line to multiple manufacturing partners. It all started with a report from the very credible Wall Street Journal and the rumors went something like this: Google will offer its “Nexus” name and early access to the latest stock Android builds to any OEM who is willing to play by Google’s rules and build their phones with a minimum set of specs set by Google’s team. There was said to be five new Nexus phones from five different manufacturers (LG, HTC, Sony, Samsung, and Motorola) all released on November 5th (Android’s 5th birthday) and they’d each be sold in Google’s new Play Store. Sounds pretty plausible, right? Android had finally grown up as an operating system, and now it was time to get the pure Google experience on as many powerful flagship phones as possible, while bypassing the manufacturers ugly and unconventional skins. To be honest, when I first read this rumor I was beyond excited. I absolutely love stock Android (post Ice Cream Sandwich) and was salivating about the fact that I’d get to choose from several top of the line hardware variations for my next Nexus.

Well, the rumors didn’t pan out (not yet, at least). November came and Google released not five, but one solitary Nexus phone: the LG Nexus 4. The rumors of an HTC built Nexus 5 just never materialized, and today it seems that the dream of having multiple Nexus phones to choose from is long gone. It seems that Google has chosen its strategy: pick one manufacturing partner with the most cutting edge technology and lowest price points, then work closely with them to release the one successor Nexus phone per year. Some of you are still waiting, hoping, maybe even longing for Google to change its strategy and give us some choice by opening its Nexus program to multiple manufacturers, but I am no longer one of those people.

I believe Google would fail to deliver properly coded, smooth functioning, high quality software updates in a timely manner if it had to manage five separate Nexus phones. Google is having a hard enough time managing the devices it’s already got (let alone getting them launched right). This can be seen with the buggy Nexus 7 4.2 update that caused users’ devices to lag, stutter and chop themselves to oblivion. It can be seen by the fact that the entrepreneurial developers over on XDA can optimize Google’s code and get us better battery life than Google’s high paid Android engineers can (my Nexus 7 gets twice the battery life running when a CM 10.1 nightly ROM compared to the stock Android software). If Google is having trouble getting decent code out to these three different sized devices (the Nexus 4, Nexus 7, and Nexus 10), then how could we expect to get finished, polished, timely updates to 5, 10 or even 20 Nexus phones made by different manufacturers with different chip sets? No, I think Google has given up on that idea, and I for one am glad. The evidence that Google is overwhelmed with different devices to care for can be seen by the fact that they’ve recently cut off support for the Nexus S and Motorola Xoom. It seems that Google is struggling to keep up and do a good job. In this case, less is more.

I may be the minority among Android fanatics, but I’d rather have one Nexus device that works perfectly and gets quick updates, than have many phones to choose from that are all buggy, half-baked and slow to get updates. I am hoping that Google keeps its Nexus line “closed”.

What do you guys think? Would you rather have Google offer several Nexus phones at once? Or do you think it would mess things up and slow things down? Let us know in the comments!

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Google To Sell Motorola’s Set Top Box / Modem "Home" Division To Arris Group For $2.35 Billion

motorola-logo-big

Telecom equipment manufacturer Arris Group has just announced that it will acquire the Home division of Motorola from Google, for a total of $2.35 billion in cash and stock. The sale of the division had been predicted from basically the day Google announced its purchase of Moto, and in recent weeks was all but confirmed.

As part of the deal, Google will gain a 15.7% share of Arris Group. The Motorola Home division encompasses products like set top boxes, broadband modems, landline phones, and (apparently) baby monitors.

While some have criticized Google’s decision to sell off Moto’s modem and TV manufacturing arm, it makes complete sense: even a wide expansion of Google Fiber wouldn’t require a $2 billion+ set top box business, and I doubt Google has any interest in manufacturing modems for the likes of Comcast or Verizon.

Done With This Post? You Might Also Like These:

Google To Sell Motorola’s Set Top Box / Modem "Home" Division To Arris Group For $2.35 Billion was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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A Rumor Revisited: Will Google open its Nexus line to multiple partners? I hope not.

A few months ago, before Google released its most recent Nexus phone, the LG Nexus 4, there were several substantial rumors floating around that Google was planning on opening its Nexus line to multiple manufacturing partners. It all started with a report from the very credible Wall Street Journal and the rumors went something like this: Google will offer its “Nexus” name and early access to the latest stock Android builds to any OEM who is willing to play by Google’s rules and build their phones with a minimum set of specs set by Google’s team. There was said to be five new Nexus phones from five different manufacturers (LG, HTC, Sony, Samsung, and Motorola) all released on November 5th (Android’s 5th birthday) and they’d each be sold in Google’s new Play Store. Sounds pretty plausible, right? Android had finally grown up as an operating system, and now it was time to get the pure Google experience on as many powerful flagship phones as possible, while bypassing the manufacturers ugly and unconventional skins. To be honest, when I first read this rumor I was beyond excited. I absolutely love stock Android (post Ice Cream Sandwich) and was salivating about the fact that I’d get to choose from several top of the line hardware variations for my next Nexus.

Well, the rumors didn’t pan out (not yet, at least). November came and Google released not five, but one solitary Nexus phone: the LG Nexus 4. The rumors of an HTC built Nexus 5 just never materialized, and today it seems that the dream of having multiple Nexus phones to choose from is long gone. It seems that Google has chosen its strategy: pick one manufacturing partner with the most cutting edge technology and lowest price points, then work closely with them to release the one successor Nexus phone per year. Some of you are still waiting, hoping, maybe even longing for Google to change its strategy and give us some choice by opening its Nexus program to multiple manufacturers, but I am no longer one of those people.

I believe Google would fail to deliver properly coded, smooth functioning, high quality software updates in a timely manner if it had to manage five separate Nexus phones. Google is having a hard enough time managing the devices it’s already got (let alone getting them launched right). This can be seen with the buggy Nexus 7 4.2 update that caused users’ devices to lag, stutter and chop themselves to oblivion. It can be seen by the fact that the entrepreneurial developers over on XDA can optimize Google’s code and get us better battery life than Google’s high paid Android engineers can (my Nexus 7 gets twice the battery life running when a CM 10.1 nightly ROM compared to the stock Android software). If Google is having trouble getting decent code out to these three different sized devices (the Nexus 4, Nexus 7, and Nexus 10), then how could we expect to get finished, polished, timely updates to 5, 10 or even 20 Nexus phones made by different manufacturers with different chip sets? No, I think Google has given up on that idea, and I for one am glad. The evidence that Google is overwhelmed with different devices to care for can be seen by the fact that they’ve recently cut off support for the Nexus S and Motorola Xoom. It seems that Google is struggling to keep up and do a good job. In this case, less is more.

I may be the minority among Android fanatics, but I’d rather have one Nexus device that works perfectly and gets quick updates, than have many phones to choose from that are all buggy, half-baked and slow to get updates. I am hoping that Google keeps its Nexus line “closed”.

What do you guys think? Would you rather have Google offer several Nexus phones at once? Or do you think it would mess things up and slow things down? Let us know in the comments!

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Foxconn rumored to be making the Amazon Phone

Amazon has had quite a lot of success selling their Android-based Kindle Fire tablets, and we’ve long heard rumors that the online mega-store will continue to build on that momentum by adding an Amazon Smartphone to the mix. Well, today those rumors are heating up.  According to industry sources, Amazon has struck an exclusive deal with Chinese manufacturer Foxconn (who is famous for manufacturing Apple’s iPhone and iPad, among other things) to build 5 million units of the yet unnamed Amazon smartphone. The phone is said to be released in quarter two or quarter three of 2013, and is rumored to be very affordably priced at $100 to $200. Amazon has become well known for selling good hardware at low prices, relying on content sales (books, magazines, music, etc) to make up the majority of their profits. If Amazon is able to deliver a high end phone at such a low off contract price-point, they are really going to give Google’s Nexus line a run for its money.

Source: CENS

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Foxconn rumored to be making the Amazon Phone

Amazon has had quite a lot of success selling their Android-based Kindle Fire tablets, and we’ve long heard rumors that the online mega-store will continue to build on that momentum by adding an Amazon Smartphone to the mix. Well, today those rumors are heating up.  According to industry sources, Amazon has struck an exclusive deal with Chinese manufacturer Foxconn (who is famous for manufacturing Apple’s iPhone and iPad, among other things) to build 5 million units of the yet unnamed Amazon smartphone. The phone is said to be released in quarter two or quarter three of 2013, and is rumored to be very affordably priced at $100 to $200. Amazon has become well known for selling good hardware at low prices, relying on content sales (books, magazines, music, etc) to make up the majority of their profits. If Amazon is able to deliver a high end phone at such a low off contract price-point, they are really going to give Google’s Nexus line a run for its money.

Source: CENS

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Foxconn rumored to be making the Amazon smartphone

Just like that, the rumors of an Amazon smartphone have once again kicked off. Of course, this is far from the first time we have heard rumors about such a device coming from Amazon. And while we have yet to see anything official from Amazon, this latest round of rumors does involve the manufacturing side. Specifically, details coming out of Foxconn.

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The report is based on a new article coming from the Taiwan Economic News who are reporting that Foxconn will be making the Amazon smartphone. According to details provided thus far, Foxconn is expected to ship 5 million units later in the year. We have yet to see much in terms of when this is expected for release, however rumors suggest somewhere in the second or third quarter of 2013.

Simply put, we likely still have some time before we learn anything official here. Other details coming from the report suggest that the handset will debut with a price somewhere between $100 and $200. Of course, speaking truthfully, that doesn’t tell us all that much. Foxconn is also said to be working with J Touch Corp. and Young Fast Optoelectronics Co., Ltd. Both of these companies are Taiwanese parts suppliers.

Finally, in addition to an Amazon branded smartphone, it was also said that the company has already begun working on the next-generation Kindle Fire which is expected to debut in the third quarter of 2013. Nothing much else in terms of the Kindle Fire details, other than that some of the parts are said to be coming from Quanta Computer Inc. and Compal Electronics Inc.

[via CENS]

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Foxconn reportedly manufacturing Amazon smartphone

Foxconn reportedly manufacturing Amazon smartphone

Rumors about an Amazon smartphone heated up this summer, and the latest whispers — from Taiwan Economic News — say the e-retailer is turning to Foxconn to construct its handset. Amazon is said to have put in a five-million-unit order with the Chinese company, which we’ve already seen mentioned as the potential manufacturer for this device. The report also says the phone will launch in the second or third quarter of 2013, with a price somewhere in the $100-to-$200 range. Stay tuned, as more rumors are sure to come.

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Via: SlashGear

Source: Taiwan Economic News

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Windows Phone 7.8 Update Now Rolling Out To Nokia Lumia 800 Smartphones

nokia-wp7.8

Microsoft’s Windows Phone 8 OS is the latest and greatest version of the Windows Phone operating system. However, there are a large number of customers still using Windows Phone 7 running handsets. And as Microsoft is going on a new path with Windows Phone 8, the new OS will not be supported on older legacy devices. Which is why Microsoft announced the Windows Phone 7.8 update to keep frustrated users at bay. But as with any OS update, this one too has been delayed, for quite some time now since the announcement in June. Not sure we can exactly call it a delay as Microsoft has never mentioned a specific time frame for the roll out of the update.

But that was all in the past, as it seems like Nokia has started rolling out the Windows Phone 7.8 to its first WP smartphone, the Lumia 800. What this means is that Microsoft has begun releasing the update to OEMs which is known as RTM (Release to Manufacturing). So in simple terms, Microsoft has done its job of providing the update and it’s now up to the manufacturers and carriers to roll out the update to their respective smartphones. This is a process which could take some time.

Nokia, as expected, is the first to roll out the update complete with its suite of apps. It is still not clear whether all of Nokia’s WP7 smartphones will be supported as the Finns haven’t published an update list of any sort, nor have any manufacturers as a matter of fact. The info comes from a Dutch source, which mentions that the Zune software (which is required for the update) will download a total of four updates to get to the final version. This is easily the biggest update a WP7 device has seen since WP7.5 a.k.a Mango which launched more than a year ago.

So this is excellent news for owners of the Lumia 800, as it brings a plethora of customization to the table like the ability to resize tiles, new accent colors and some under the hood tweaks that we’re not being told about. This however poses a question about WP devices made by other manufacturers. The Samsung Focus, Focus S, Focus 2, Focus Flash etc are sold by AT&T and could see the update being delayed as the carrier has never been too friendly with WP updates. I guess this is one of the perks of owning a Nokia Windows Phone.

Bear in mind that this could be a partial roll out and some Lumia 800 owners might have to wait a while to get it in their region. Users can keep checking back every day, which I’m sure they won’t mind considering how much this new update brings to the table.

Source: WP7.nl (Dutch)
Via: GSM Arena

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Flextronics acquires Motorola bases in China and Brazil

Motorola-Mobility-Office

To turn Motorola Mobility into a profitable state, Google aggressively streamlined 20 percent of its workforce and one-third of its offices and it still continues its cost cutting drive. One of the most recent developments is that Motorola Mobility has already closed a deal with a Singaporean-based company, Flextronics, selling its bases in China and Brazil.

In a joint statement released on Monday, it was revealed that Motorola sold its production operations in Tianjin, China and the management of its facilities in Jaguariuna, Brazil for an amount yet undisclosed. The deal is reportedly going to conclude in the first half of 2013 and would include “manufacturing services agreement for Android and other mobile devices.”

Flextronics boasts stability in its manufacturing expertise in 30 countries across four continents. Having signed this agreement with Motorola would definitely bring mutual benefits to both but analysts believe it is the latter that would take advantage of the deal. The senior vice president of Motorola noted that this is an “important step forward” for the company to turn its supply chain into a competitive advantage.

“We look forward to leveraging our extensive manufacturing expertise and supply chain solutions to provide Motorola Mobility with increased value,” Flextronics CEO Mike McNamara said.

Google’s acquisition of Motorola was believed to be an intellectual property move considering the company has a large and strong mobile patents portfolio that it could use to boost its dominance in the mobile market. Google, however, pledged to make Motorola a separate and independent Android vendor.

This is not the first time Motorola and Flextronics would be working together. Both also signed a multi-billion five-year contract, which was scaled back a year later, in 2000.

Motorola is also shutting down many of its international sites. It also recently announced of its plan to pull out from South Korea next year. Only the company knows which sites will be shut down just to bring it back to profitability. The assurance is, Google has its back.

[source]

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Intel ready to shrink mobile SoC circuitry to 22 nanometers

Intel Logo

Intel is hoping to become more competitive in 2013 with new manufacturing processes that will shrink chip circuitry from 32 to 22 nanometers (nm) in size. The chip maker has been trying its best to make a run at the smartphone market, with a couple of devices like the Motorola RAZR i, but just hasn't seen the market share it was hoping for. One of the original issues with Intel processors for phones and tablets — marketed under the Atom brand name — was their power consumption, which seemed to lag behind that of comparable ARM units.

This new process, based on its "TriGate" technology used for its larger PC processors, uses three-dimensional transistor structures that help save space and therefore increase efficiency. Intel claims 22- to 65-percent performance improvements in its 22nm chips compared to current 32nm units. The company does admit that it is about 6 months behind schedule on releasing SoC's, but analysts expect them to become available in the second half of 2013.

Even if the technology checks out, Intel still has an uphill battle ahead of it. The next part of this equation will be convincing smartphone and tablet manufacturers that Atom is a better choice than price-competitive ARM units — as well as consumers that "Intel Inside" is something they want in more than just their PC.

Source: WSJ

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IBM manufactures light-based ‘nanophotonic’ chips to let the terabytes flow

There has been a major advancement in optical communications, by establishing and developing in a manufacturing environment, the ability to use light instead of electrical signals to channelize and transmit information for future computing. The quantum leap of intelligence and invention of the human race witnessed astonishing developments in the last 100 years. The breakthrough in the technology was achieved by IBM which took a huge step towards computer chips that use small packets of light called photons instead of electrons by manufacturing the first 90nm silicon-based optical processing modules. Silicon nanophotonics allows the integration and union of different optical components side-by-side with electrical circuits on a single silicon chip using, sub-100nm semiconductor technology.

This achievement is a consequence of more than a decade of pioneering and mind boggling research at IBM. Silicon nanophotonics utlilizes pulses of light for communication and transmission, thus provides a super highway for large volumes of data to move at a very high speed between computer chips in servers, large datacenters, and supercomputers. This also assuages and lessens the limitations of congested and jammed data traffic and high-cost traditional interconnects.

The amount of data being created and transmitted over enterprise networks continues to expand and evolve due to an explosion of new applications and services. Silicon nanophotonics, now is ready for use for several commercial development, enabling the industry to keep pace with escalating demands in chip performance and computing power. Thus we could see an end to any impediment in systems whether it’s a few centimeters or a few kilometers away from each other.

IBM’s CMOS nanophotonics technology made it evident that transceivers will exceed the data rate of 25Gbps per channel. In addition, the technology is competent enough of feeding a number of parallel optical data streams into a single fiber by making use of compact on-chip wavelength-division multiplexing devices. The ability to multiplex large data streams at high data rates will further scale optical communications capability of delivering terabytes of data between distant parts of computer systems.

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Samsung Galaxy S4 could feature ‘unbreakable’ display, launch as soon as April

Samsung’s flexible OLED technology has been in the works for sometime now, but it could finally debut as part of the upcoming Galaxy S4′s hardware complement. But before you start conjuring up visions of a bendable, foldable handset, it is sounding like the technology will be deployed more for its resistance to breakage than for its pliability.

The screen of the Galaxy S4 has already made headlines after rumors that it will be Samsung’s first 1080p display. With a size of 4.99 inches, a pixel density of 441 ppi is generated. Adding in Samsung’s “unbreakable” tech, which takes advantage of the fact that OLED displays can be manufactured from plastics instead of glass, the screen will likely be one of the GS4′s key marketing points (as it has been with previous Galaxy models).

Analyst Nicolas Gaudois says signs point to an earlier release for the Galaxy S4 than previous Galaxy models, which typically have hit shelves around May or June. An accelerated schedule could see the phone debut as early as April (though we have already heard manufacturing delays involving the very screen tech in question could be hampering Samsung’s plans). As for those foldable displays, Stanford Bernstein analyst Mark Newman thinks those will emerge closer to 2014 as unbreakable screen technology develops.

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Rumor: Samsung’s Galaxy S4 to Have Unbreakable Display

According to speculation by analysts, Samsung may include an “unbreakable” display in the Galaxy S4 when it is released early next year. Samsung is currently a frontrunner to developer flexible (plastic substrate) OLED displays, a product that analysts claim will see volume manufacturing in the very near future. That volume manufacturing may also play in nicely to [...]

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