Posts Tagged media consumption

Amazon Blocking Competitors E-Reader Apps?

The Amazon Kindle Fire has been the best selling item to date on amazon.com, that says a lot considering how long Amazon has been around.  Amazon’s Kindle Fire is the ultimate media consumption machine. It’s also been said that Amazon is taking a small loss on each Kindle Fire, hoping to recoup that money with purchases from each user.

Now one thing that can get in the way of those media consumption dollars would be competing e-book reader services like Kobo for instance. According to this report from Android Guys, it looks like Amazon may be blocking, or at least making it harder to find those competing apps in the Amazon market place.

Sure, it may have been a point of discomfort for Amazon to allow e-readers and such in their Android app store before the Kindle Fire but now they are directly competing with those developers.

A developer called “BlueFire” (no relation to Kindle Fire) was reportedly notified by Amazon that their app was compatible with the new Kindle Fire however when they went to search for it themselves they couldn’t find it.

source: Android Guys

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Adobe product manager fingers Apple for death of Flash Player for mobile

Adobe’s battles with Apple haven’t exactly been a secret over the past couple of years, but the death of Flash Player for mobile has once again brought that drama to the fore. Mike Chambers, a lead product manager for Flash, took to his personal site today to shed some light on Adobe’s rapid descent, pointing the finger squarely at Apple’s refusal to adopt the player in its mobile OS. He had this to say:

This one should be pretty apparent, but given the fragmentation of the mobile market, and the fact that one of the leading mobile platforms (Apple’s iOS) was not going to allow the Flash Player in the browser, the Flash Player was not on track to reach anywhere near the ubiquity of the Flash Player on desktops… Just to be very clear on this. No matter what we did, the Flash Player was not going to be available on Apple’s iOS anytime in the foreseeable future.

That combined with the “strong support for HTML5 across modern devices,” was apparently enough to drive the final nail into Flash’s coffin. Among other things, Chambers cited the use of apps instead of browsers for media consumption and the complexity of the mobile market as further reasons for Adobe’s decision. He went on to say that Adobe has a “long term commitment to the Flash Player on desktops,” but concluded by encouraging Flash developers to diversify their skill sets. For the very lengthy full-form version of Chambers’ explanation, hit the source link below, but we’d suggest grabbing a drink before you do so.

Adobe product manager fingers Apple for death of Flash Player for mobile originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 11 Nov 2011 20:14:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceMike Chambers  | Email this | Comments

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Motorola readies ET1 7-inch rugged business tablet

Android still isn’t considered especially business-friendly (that title still rests with the increasingly humble Blackberry) and most “business tablets” come with either a full version of Windows, Windows CE or a custom operating system. Motorola is aiming to change that with the ET1, a rugged business tablet designed specifically for point-of-sale operations and other things done while listening to Bachman Turner Overdrive. Compared to Cisco’s Cius tablet, it could be a winner.

The 7-inch tablet isn’t likely to fulfill the wishes of the Android enthusiast crowd, but then it isn’t really meant to. It includes a rather standard 1024 x 700 panel behind protective Gorilla Glass, front and rear cameras, and a swappable 4620 mAh battery, all powered by a 1GHz processor and a full gigabyte of RAM. It’s not the lightest tablet out there at 1.4 pounds, but it’s rated to survive multiple drops at anywhere between -4 and 158 degrees Fahrenheit. As of now only a WiFi model is being offered, but mobile broadband variants are scheduled for the future. Motorola is aiming to keep the pice “below $1000″ with discounts for bulk enterprise orders.

Android 2.3 Gingerbread rests on the ET1′s rugged silicon, but keep in mind, this device isn’t meant for media consumption and web surfing like most Honeycomb tablets. Motorola is including some industry-focused software tweaks, like multi-user log-ins, point-of-sale tools, and built-in encryption for the 8GB of on-board storage. Remote access allows IT managers to wipe devices that have been lost or stolen. The ET1 is expected to make its way into enterprise hands in the fourth quarter – calendar, not fiscal.

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Motorola readies ET1 7-inch rugged business tablet

Android still isn’t considered especially business-friendly (that title still rests with the increasingly humble Blackberry) and most “business tablets” come with either a full version of Windows, Windows CE or a custom operating system. Motorola is aiming to change that with the ET1, a rugged business tablet designed specifically for point-of-sale operations and other things done while listening to Bachman Turner Overdrive. Compared to Cisco’s Cius tablet, it could be a winner.

The 7-inch tablet isn’t likely to fulfill the wishes of the Android enthusiast crowd, but then it isn’t really meant to. It includes a rather standard 1024 x 700 panel behind protective Gorilla Glass, front and rear cameras, and a swappable 4620 mAh battery, all powered by a 1GHz processor and a full gigabyte of RAM. It’s not the lightest tablet out there at 1.4 pounds, but it’s rated to survive multiple drops at anywhere between -4 and 158 degrees Fahrenheit. As of now only a WiFi model is being offered, but mobile broadband variants are scheduled for the future. Motorola is aiming to keep the pice “below $1000″ with discounts for bulk enterprise orders.

Android 2.3 Gingerbread rests on the ET1′s rugged silicon, but keep in mind, this device isn’t meant for media consumption and web surfing like most Honeycomb tablets. Motorola is including some industry-focused software tweaks, like multi-user log-ins, point-of-sale tools, and built-in encryption for the 8GB of on-board storage. Remote access allows IT managers to wipe devices that have been lost or stolen. The ET1 is expected to make its way into enterprise hands in the fourth quarter – calendar, not fiscal.

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Time to Tab my way: portable media center

Porchtop

When the weather permits I’m the kind of fella who likes to sit outside and enjoy a bit of fresh air.  That doesn’t mean I like to sit quietly and enjoy nature though — I need to take my toys out with me.  That means a laptop to do a little work with, and now my Galaxy Tab 10.1 with the multimedia dock and a set of desktop speakers from my local big box store. 

 

For watching video, listening to music, or kicking back in the Android Central Turntable.fm room listening to the jams, this setup rocks.  It lets me keep my laptop free for working, no pausing video and switching tabs and windows every five minutes, and the viewing angle is just perfect while my Tab is in the dock.  Plus you can plug the dock in to AC power to keep things charged, or use the 30 pin passthrough connector with the Samsung dongle for HDMI access.  The built in speakers on the Tab work while it’s docked, but there’s also a 3.5mm audio jack on the multimedia dock to connect a set of speakers to if you need a bit more volume — handy to drown out the chorus of mockingbirds that seems to start right around dusk here at the homestead.

The best part?  Everything is portable.  When it’s raining or cold, and I’m forced to stay indoors the dock and speakers can sit right on my desk or coffee table and still let me enjoy a little video or audio from my Tab, and the whole set-up makes for a hell of a bedside clock if you set it up on your nightstand.  If you like to use your Galaxy Tab as a media consumption device, you ought to check one of these out.  I’ve tossed a couple pictures of the dock itself after the break.

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Google TV Not Going Anywhere Soon, Platform Looks to Expand

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Speaking at the Edinburgh International Television Festival, Chairman Eric Schmidt reaffirmed Google’s commitment to their struggling TV platform. In fact, Schmidt says Google TV is looking to expand with more partners moving forward, pointing to a limited selection of hardware and software integrated into televisions sets, devices that consumers buy sparingly. With a new build of Google TV in the pipeline, the planned release of the platform in Europe, and a new set of hardware waiting in the wings, the tech giant hopes to make another big push in the coming months. Schmidt also did not deny talk that Google could leverage its recent Motorola acquisition to place Google TV directly into the set-top boxes dished out by cable companies.

While we here at Phandroid are avid supporters of the platform, we admit that the platform still has some work to be done. Google seems bent on making the internet television revolution a reality, if only to find a way to reap the advertising profits of the main source of media consumption in the household. For now, Google has enough excess funds to keep pumping money into the business in the hopes that someday it will take off.

[via Engadget]


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Qualcomm Uplinq 2011 Keynote Details: 3D, Augmented Reality, Peer-to-Peer Gaming

Today Qualcomm was at the Uplinq 2011 Event and started things off this morning on the first keynote with Dr Paul Jacobs, Chairman and CEO of Qualcomm. He was standing in front of a huge screen that showed impressive idea’s, data, and numbers throughout the keynote. Jacobs commented that they’ve learned mobile data is expected to increase and grow by 10-12 fold come 2015 and they plan to be around for it all. He also mentions that Qualcomm’s shipped over 1 Billion devices already. Those are some impressive numbers to start off the day.

They talked a lot about Qualcomm of course, but lots of discussion was also on 3D, Augmented Reality and other forms of media consumption. Nokia, Sony Ericsson and others all had their time on stage, as well as a few folks from Dreamworks to talk about DVDs but I’ll mention more on that later.

CreativeArtistsAgency aka CAA, Qualcomm’s newest partners took the stage next and had some impressive numbers of their own to report, mentioning that over 250 Snapdragon devices are currently under development. If that doesn’t get you excited for the future I don’t know what will. Next up we saw Sony Ericsson take the stage and show us more on that Xperia Play we all know and love.

Sony Ericsson talked briefly about a few of their devices like we mentioned above, as well as the partnership with Qualcomm so we should be seeing more exciting things in the future coming out of team SE. I have a feeling a Sony Ericsson dual-core Snapdragon gaming tablet might be headed our way soon, possibly 3D. Just thought I’d throw that out there.

There was talk about 3D, and the Qualcomm MDP 1.5 Ghz Dual-core platform. They used the MDP device to show some Kung-fu Panda in 3D on the big screen, as well as some Peer-to-Peer gaming done on a HTC Tablet.

Dreamworks was invited on stage via President of Production and Feature Animation, John Batter. He talked a little about Kung-Fu Panda and selling DVD’s using augmented reality and pushing the media consumption idea. He went on to mention Dreamworks pre-selling DVDs and users could order with their device and get custom content right to their phone after making a DVD purchase. Interesting idea’s are floating around that is for sure.

Last but not least here are a few pictures from the big screen we mentioned at first, showing some of those numbers and statistics we talked about earlier.

This is just a small overview of the events on stage as well as pictures for your viewing pleasure. We hope to hear some more exciting news today especially regarding Android so stay tuned for more information.

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DROID TV turns your Android into a mobile television experience

Everyone is still looking for that killer app that will rival iTunes for media consumption. Sure there’s audio options out there including Double Twist and Pandora, but what about for watching your favorite TV shows? Hulu for Android is still not out. YouTube has the market cornered on viral videos. What about watching real shows? Droid TV may be that killer app. But not for everyone.

Droid TV works by downloading television episodes and storying them on the Android’s SD card. So, it means you need at least 2GB free for every episode you want to watch. It also requires Android handsets running Android 2.1 (Eclair) and above with a minimum screen resolution of 480×800. And the most killer requirement is that you need a processor that’s at least 1Ghz, which is fine if you have an HTC Thunderbolt, but anything older than last June and you’re probably out of luck.

As we reported last week, tablets are becoming the entertainment option of choice over TVs and PCs. So that makes having a mobile video solution even more important. Advantages of downloading over streaming are obvious. You can download episodes when you’re in a WiFi hotspot or at home, save them and you’re on your way. And that will save your precious bandwidth, which these days is far from the “unlimited” advertised. It also means a buffer free experience, which is something streaming options can’t guarantee. Subscriptions for Droid TV start at $6 for six months. Here’s hoping it’s a legal app that escapes Hollywood’s notice.

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[via Android Me Up]

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ASUS’ Honeycomb Eee Pad Transformer tablet gets official launch

As promised, ASUS has officially launched the Eee Pad Transformer, the company’s Android 3.0 Honeycomb tablet. The 10.1-inch slate runs NVIDIA’s dual-core Tegra 2 processor, and has a removable keyboard with an integrated secondary battery that helps boost runtime to 16hrs.

Alone, the Transformer slate manages a healthy 9.5hrs according to ASUS’ predictions. There’s also 16GB or 32GB of internal storage, WiFi b/g/n, Bluetooth 2.1+EDR, twin cameras – 5-megapixels on the back, 1.3-megapixels on the front – and optional integrated 3G. The 10.1-inch 1280 x 800 display uses an IPS panel with 10-point multitouch and Gorilla Glass.

Unfortunately, ASUS hasn’t confirmed official pricing for the Eee Pad Transformer in the US, though there was the suggestion last week that it could be €399 in Europe. More details in the press release below.

Press Release:

ASUS Introduces the Eee Pad Transformer

– Innovation meets Versatility as ASUS launches the Eee Pad Transformer TF101 tablet with a unique expandable keyboard docking station –

Fremont, CA (March 25, 2011) – ASUS is excited to announce the launch* of the Eee Pad Transformer, the best tablet choice for users looking for media consumption and mobile productivity in an elegant yet versatile design. The ASUS Eee Pad Transformer features the powerful and responsive Android 3.0 operating system, an optional expandable keyboard docking station, and ASUS’ intuitive Waveshare user interface that results in an exciting portable tablet for content creation, social communication, high-definition media playback and smooth realistic game play.

Exciting mini-cinema entertainment on-the-go
Powered by the NVIDIA® Tegra™ 2 dual-core processor, the Transformer browses the web at blazing speeds, providing snappier response times and excellent multi-tasking performance. An IPS (in-plane switching) Panel made from durable and scratch-resistant Corning® Gorilla® Glass is viewable at angles up to 178°, perfect for sharing your favorite photos, web pages, work documents and more with co-workers, friends or family next you or across the room. The 10.1” IPS panel features LED backlighting that provides brilliant and vivid colors at a 1280×800 resolution, perfect for viewing high-definition movies and other media content.

Built-in SRS Sound technology provides a dynamic 3D stereo audio experience, with maximum bass response and a wide sound field from the discrete speakers housed in a thin 0.51” thick chassis that only weighs 1.49lbs. A 1.2MP front-facing camera is perfect for video conferencing while the rear-facing 5MP camera can shoot and record HD video, which can be played back on HDTVs via the mini HDMI output port, making the Eee Pad Transformer a true mobile entertainment device.

Transform from pad to notebook mode with optional keyboard docking station
The Transformer sets itself apart from other tablets on the market by featuring an optional docking station. This unique docking station provides access to a full QWERTY keyboard along with unique Android Function keys, instantly turning the Transformer into a mobile content creation device.

A touchpad, 3.5mm audio jack, two USB ports as well as a built-in SD Card reader for easy file sharing and storage expandability makes the Transformer a versatile media hub. The docking station also extends the Transformer’s 9.5 hours** of battery life up to 16 hours**, so users can use it all day for work or play. In addition, the ultra-convenient ASUS WebStorage* with one year of unlimited storage space provides worry-free cloud computing.

Android 3.0 OS melds with ASUS’ Waveshare UI for a unique user experience
Google’s Android 3.0 (Honeycomb) is a revolutionary operating system specially designed and optimized for tablets, which enables users a rich web experience for on-the-go web browsing, social media activities, video playback and casual gaming. Supporting Adobe® Flash® 10.2*** and the ever growing Android Market, media entertainment is just a finger swipe away. The convenient ASUS Launcher also allows users to easily launch software, manage content and access online services and connect devices with a few simple taps, while ASUS’ Waveshare Interface hosts a variety of unique applications* such as MyNet, MyLibrary, MyCloud and more.

MyNet easily streams digital media wirelessly within home network devices so HD videos or music can be played on devices such as an HDTV or desktop PCs for an even better experience from the Transformer. MyLibrary consolidates downloaded books, magazines and newspapers in to one easy to browse profile while MyCloud is a total cloud solution, providing access to digital content such as music, videos and files from the cloud anywhere, anytime. Users can even use MyCloud to remotely access and control any PC or Mac system and access applications or files to extend the versatility of the Eee Pad Transformer experience.

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