Posts Tagged music industry

Last.fm shuts down radio subscription service after 1 year

last-fm-logo

After only one year, Last.fm has shut down their radio subscription service, citing “the music industry’s rapid change” for the decision, likely referencing popular online radio services like Pandora and Spotify.

While the service never really competed with other online radio services, it did have a following in Germany and Canada. Despite this, shutting it down could be the best option in order to focus on their goal of helping people discover new music. In January Spotify announced that users could listen to any music from its website in Spotify, and this partnership will still remain.

Source: The Verge

Come comment on this article: Last.fm shuts down radio subscription service after 1 year

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Apple celebrates a decade of iTunes

iTunes Store

 

The iTunes Store is almost ten years old and on April 28 the company will celebrate arguably one of the best innovations Apple brought about.

Back in a time when bootleg and copied CDs and MP3 songs were all the range, Apple stepped in with a collaborative solution to all the problems in the music industry.

It wouldn’t fix everything and it would pull from both the consumers and from the music industry something they hold dear. From the music industry, it was price and albums; from the consumer, it was paying for music.

Impressively, the combined effort paid off and with iTunes the iPod became one of the biggest revolutions in the music industry. Hundreds of millions were sold in the years that followed.

This decade long trip shows iTunes from the start and the progress Apple has taken in the music world, from the original iPod to the iPhone to the present day iTunes store.

From what we know, Apple will not be celebrating this with any free audio or video. Unlike Google, who regularly do this for apps and services, Apple has never seemed to be bothered.

Apple has shared a list of artists, songs and albums popular at that time. Ten years ago, the top-selling song that day was U2′s “Stuck in a Moment,” and the top-selling album was Beck’s “Sea Change.”

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Twitter set to make music social with a new app this weekend

Lately we’ve been hearing reports and rumors that the folks from Twitter are getting into one more market soon. That being the music industry, which is a huge part of Twitter on a second-by-second basis. Earlier this month we reported on rumors that Twitter was planning a new music discovery and search Twitter app, and now we’re hearing it will be launched this weekend.

twitter-music

Multiple reports have hit the wires the past few days claiming during the upcoming Coachella event this weekend is when Twitter will make their splash. So far we still don’t know exactly what the new music service will be all about, but we have a feeling Twitter might shun Android and launch on iOS only, again, at first.

According to Mashable this is all but confirmed. And big celebrities like Ryan Seacrest of American Idol have been using and tweeting about it all week. Oh and the music discovery platform We Are Hunted just joined Twitter, even though Twitter acquired the company back last year. It looks like everything is lined up and ready to go.

Some stated today we’d be getting the official announcement, so we’ll stay tuned for more details. Either way it looks like the massive music festival in California will be the platform in which we learn the first of many details. Twitter’s latest addition, Vine, is still iOS only so don’t get your hopes up for Twitter Music being available on Android at launch. Stay tuned music fans and go listen to some Metallica S&M music to start your weekend.

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Labbler: The Social Network for Music Professionals And Fans

So you think we have all the social networks that we need right now? A new social network has just began operations and is currently in open beta Labbler is a new social network that tried to be different by catering to music professionals and fans alike. While you might think that this is another MySpace copycat there’s actually more to it.

labbler

What this network aims to accomplish is to connect everyone related to the music industry all in one place. This means that recording artists, producers, fans, dj’s, agents, and others will have one place to go to. In theory this is actually great since music artists can easily connect with agents while fans can easily get updates on their favorite artists. While this can easily be done through other networks such as Facebook or Twitter, Labbler goes a step further by providing users with advanced features.

An artist will be able to easily import his or her tracks to Labbler using either Beatport or Soundcloud. Advanced analytics will be presented to better understand what the audience and potential partner’s wants. In the future features such as invoicing, deal tracking and business ranking will be added. A Supplier’s category will also be added for fans to be able to buy digital content. Other features will also be added in the future depending on the feedback of users.

Since this is a new network what is lacking right now is the number of members. If more artists will be using this network then it will be great for the music industry.

Signing up is easy and all you need is a valid email address. Once you are verified you will immediately see your profile page. On top of the page are categories which separate the feeds coming from Artists, Labels, Clubs, Media, Promoters, Bookings, and Events. This makes it easier for you to determine what kind of posts are being made.

If you love music or are connected with the music industry then try to check out Labbler.

Via Labbler

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Pandora Skips While Microsoft Rolls Out Streaming Music/Radio Plans

 

The streaming music industry is littered with a bunch half-ass suppliers and and a few real quality ones.  Pandora is one of those I would consider a good high quality product.  I’ve gone through many different radio apps as I am a huge music fan.  Whenever I drive I never have the car radio on, I’m rolling my Motorola ROKR headset and rocking out to the music on my phone or Pandora all the way to and from work, even sometimes at work when I want to tune the world out.  Well, Pandora is receiving a new competitor in the streaming music market, Microsoft. 

Microsoft has decided to take on the entire existing streaming music industry and present their newest baby XBox Music.  This new music app will work on all Microsoft products from PC to Phones with, of course the Xbox residing strongly in the middle.  

This new app/product out by Microsoft has a tasty list of features it’s rolling out with:

  • The service will include free on-demand streaming music of a catalog of 30 million songs on all Win 8 and Win RT devices. The service allows creation of “an unlimited amount of playlists.”
  • A new offering called Xbox Music Pass will include offline access of unlimited playback of any track for $9.99 a month.
  • The company will also be selling tracks through the Xbox Music Store.
  • Also debuting: a Pandora-like user-programmable Internet radio service called Smart DJ, which includes unlimited skips and a view of the full recommended music stream.
  • Next year, the company plans to launch a cloud-based storage service to add personal content to your music collection, including tracks not in the Xbox Music catalog.
  • The company also plans to add social features to the service.
  • Microsoft said the service will be made available on other platforms “in the coming year.”
  • The free streaming service will launch initially in 15 markets; Xbox Music Pass will will launch in 22 markets, as will the Xbox Music Store.
As much as this new fangled app looks pretty cool, I’m one that isn’t a huge fan of most changes.  I’m a loyal guy and when I find something that works the way I like it, I have a tendency to stick with it.  I do, however, believe in not knocking something until I have had the opportunity to try it out.  How is this going to fair for the other services in the market today, Pandora, IHeartRadio, Spotify…Apple (lawsuit ensuing? IDK, didn’t Apple send the first radio transmission?  Hahah, had to do it).  If there is one thing to be said for business, competition is incredibly healthy.  Getting to comfortable is not what makes money nor drives for new heights of excellence.  I believe that Howard Schultz said it best when he came out of retirement to head Starbucks once again “Your at the top, but your not as good as you think you are” simply laying out to those that were running the company that complacency at the top makes you an easy target and without greater drive and innovation you’ll soon end up like…what was their name again…exactly.  I’m interested to see how this all pans out, how about you?
Zachdroid…OUT
Sources:  Forbes, Mark Ramsey MediaTiP, BGR 

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Kim Dotcom’s Megabox service will apparently put the music industry out of business

Even though our site has quite a bit of daily traffic, 50 million people each day is a lot. With the theory of “making shareware, into freeware”, former Megaupload founder, Kim Dotcom, achieved that substantial goal.. Through his various legal troubles and protests from anti-piracy supporters, Dotcom is more eager than ever to create his Megabox application, that can possibly change the music industry.

But what does this service do, that makes it “so important”? A couple months ago, Kim Dotcam released a statement on Twitter, describing that his Megabox app would allow users to distribute media, especially music, freely. On Tuesday, he also said that his idea will, “Turn this world upside down,” and that the service will be, “Bigger. Better. Faster. Free of charge & shielded from attacks.”

Of course we don’t know how true this is, but obviously it is no secret since the Federal Government got hold of the initial Megabox domain. Dotcom’s confidence still prevails, however, as he ensured supporters that the application will be available as a multi-platform tool on Android, iOS, and PC.

Though Kim Dotcom’s statements seem a little “far-fetched”, the computer guru plans to have the software completed and published by late 2012. I don’t believe that law enforcement will be Dotcom’s biggest problem, but rather getting the software on the devices themselves… that is the real trick.

What do you think about Kim Dotcom’s future plan to dominate the music industry? Will this software really be “revolutionary”? I would love to hear your comments.

Source: Android and Me


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Google Music Not Living Up To Expectations, Hoping Implementation Of Hardware Strategy Can Boost Numbers

A recent report filed by CNET, shows that Google has had better expectations for their music service than the numbers they are seeing so far. The Google Music service has been available for only a short time, so no one close to the project is scrambling quite yet. But the music industry is looking into it and making sure Google has [...]

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Google headed towards another lawsuit, this time by the music Industry

Seems like there isn’t any organization that is too good to drop a suit against Google anymore. The latest in potential filings would come from International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFAI) and the Recording Industry Association of America RIAA. Those are two organizations that represent the music industry have even gone as far as to obtain a preliminary legal opinion on the matter.

So what’s the suit all about? Well, it isn’t aimed at Google Music, so have no fears there. Rather the two organizations are aiming at the search portion of Google. The main reason Google exists in the first place. They claim that Google doesn’t prioritize their search results to focus on legal music downloading sites but rather on illegal file sharing locations.

IFPI wants to force Google to censor the links it provides in a typical search result from returning any sites that host or distribute illegal copyrighted content. Google has repeatedly denied the allegations that they purposefully return such sites, but rather return results based on the consumers search criteria.

“Google continues to fail to prioritize legal music sites over illegal sites in search results, claiming that its algorithm for search results is based on the relevance of sites to consumers,”

If these two entities manage to take the suit to court, it would be based on competition law and argue that Google prioritizes illegal sites and is guilty of antitrust practices. The entertainment industry is on board and is suggesting that all search engines adopt a Voluntary Code of Practice to de-list popular file sharing sites, mostly torrent sites. Instead, direct all search returns to legal locations where users can buy the music legally.

I have no personal issues about buying music if I like it, but when I don’t get to hear the whole CD I can’t make that judgment call. All to often I have purchased a CD in the past because of one song on the radio, to find out the rest of the album sucked. This is one thing that Google Music is doing right. Allowing consumers to listen to the first part of every song on an album before purchasing, and then allowing you to share the whole thing with your friends to prompt them to buy it. I refrain from downloading music illegally and have personally switched to streaming services like Spotify. I get way more music, spend WAY less money and get to listen to what ever I want. It still supports the artists in some fashion and is legal.

The pros and cons of piracy will forever and always be a hot topic of debate. Whether downloading a few a tracks, a movie or an app is right or wrong all comes down to personal choices and feelings. Do you guys draw an imaginary line between what pirated material is OK while other material isn’t? Is snagging a couple of songs you like from a record that made $30 million in sales OK in your mind while grabbing a copy of a $0.99 cent game for your phone terrible? Do you pirate to see if spending what little money you have goes to the right people and places. Let us know how you feel in the comments below.

Source: Electonista

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Rovio, creator of Angry Birds say piracy can be a good thing

Piracy is a touchy subject and has been looked down upon by many many different markets, Android included. Obviously we all know how the music industry feels on the matter, and we’ve seen the countless attacks and results from their approach. When it comes to Android or apps in general some might feel different. The creators of Angry Birds, Rovio had a thing or two to say regarding the matter — and don’t really think it’s of much concern.

SlashGear’s Shane McGlaun said it best this morning by saying, “Somewhere, an RIAA supporter is crying right now.” And we’d have to agree with him. After a conference this week Rovio CEO Mikael Hed had a few interesting comments regarding piracy and their Angry Birds brand. Here are a couple of quotes:

We could learn a lot from the music industry, and the rather terrible ways the music industry has tried to combat piracy.”

Piracy may not be a bad thing: it can get us more business at the end of the day,”

Rovio admits they’ve had their share of problems with piracy, but most of which was in regards to their Angry Birds merchandise and not games themselves. There is no doubt in my mind the Rovio owners would rather users buy their games, apps, and merchandise — but they way they make it sound it doesn’t appear like they are the slightest bit concerned. For a hugely successful company such as Rovio I can understand where they are coming from, but for the average Android developer that builds an awesome game and sees lackluster sales thanks to sneaky black market app stores this could be a very different story.

I personally feel that if you like a game, you should buy it. Support developers and game creators so they can continue to impress and develop for Android, or any other platform. That is why free versions and paid versions have been so successful thus far for Android because we can try before we buy. Not everyone has the luxury of Century Fox making movies of their games, or millions of bird pillows to boost sales.

What do you guys think? Obviously piracy hurts Android developers, but can it also be a good thing?


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Google looking to take the lead with Music

How do you bury the competition? By taking one of their strongest services and improving on it. For the past year or so Google has been seeking its answer to the iTunes Store. We’ve heard various rumors, but we’ve also heard that Google has faced significant obstacles from the record companies. Frustrated that the record companies didn’t see things their way, Google went ahead and launched a comprehensive music locker service, Google Music. But now they’re back at the table with record companies, and it appears that they’re on the brink of something even bigger.

The rumors have started to resurface, and now we’re starting to see evidence of their reality. Phandroid links information that contains a screenshot of the Google Music landing page. Option No. 1 comes as no surprise, since it’s the service we’ve all grown to know and love. Option No. 2 confirms at least part of the rumored addition to Google Music: a music store. We don’t yet know which labels Google has on board, so we don’t know the depth of the catalog. But chances are they wouldn’t launch one without the majors on board. And so they’ll have a music selection comparable to the iTunes Store. Only, the rumors don’t stop there.

In addition to buying tracks from Google Music, rumor has it you’ll be able to share those tracks, likely through Google+. There will be an expiration date on them, so it’s not as though you can give your friends free copies of what you’ve purchased. But this still brings back a social element of music that gets lost in the restrictive digital world.

Think about how you enjoyed music in the LP, cassette, and CD eras. You’d buy an album at the store, and after you listened to it a bunch you’d lend it to friends. They’d listen to it, and then maybe they’d buy their own copies. That is, the social element was good for the music industry, because it led to greater discovery. Yet with the digital age record companies have forsaken the social element due to their fear of piracy. Google Music might start bringing it back.

It will be an interesting test case. Record labels love to say that sales have declined because of piracy, but there has always been a counterpoint that they have declined because of restrictiveness. Google Music proposes to take away this level of restrictiveness and restore a time-honored part of the music experience. It might sound scary for record labels now, but in the end it could benefit all parties greatly.

This post originated at AndGeeks.com – home to all things Android! Also a great source of info about Android Phones.

Google looking to take the lead with Music

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Google opening their own MP3 store? [rumors]

Lloyd can jam

According to the New York Times, Google executives have claimed that they will be opening a Google Music MP3 store in the coming weeks.  Likely to be connected to the current Google Music Beta offering, the service would compete with Apple and Amazon to allow users to purchase and store music files in the cloud.  (Cue the lawsuits in 3, 2…).  While Google officially declined to comment to the Times, as did any of the Music labels, the idea makes perfect sense.  We know Google wanted to get content agreements for music, and after publicly criticizing the music industry Google decided to follow the route taken by Amazon and offer users storage for their own files.  In addition, the songs that are offered for free on the existing service certainly aren't royalty-free, so some arrangements have to be already standing.  If the rumor is true, this may be something we hear about on Oct. 19 at the Ice Cream Sandwich event.  We'll keep you posted if anything further develops.

Source: New York Times; via CNETThanks, Derek!

 

 


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Apple announces iTunes in the Cloud, iTunes Match

Apple has just announced its long-awaited cloud-based music service: iTunes in the Cloud. While not a streaming music service as some had speculated, it will let you download any music you’ve purchased to all of your devices at no additional charge — something Steve Jobs notes is a first for the music industry. All new music you purchase can also automatically be downloaded and pushed to up to ten different devices — and, as with the other apps that make up the broader iCloud service, it’s completely free, with a beta version available today (in the US only, unfortunately).

What’s more, Apple has also announced a complementary iTunes Match service that will let you put your existing collection of ripped CDs in the cloud. That’s done by scanning your library and matching songs to the versions Apple already has (a DRM-free 256kbps AAC file), rather than uploading everything — a process Apple notes takes “minutes,” not “weeks” — although songs will be uploaded in cases where there is no match. It will run you $24.99 a year (for up to 25,000 songs, apparently), and promises to give you all of the “same benefits as music purchased from iTunes” when it launches sometime this fall.

Apple announces iTunes in the Cloud, iTunes Match originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 06 Jun 2011 14:45:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Rooted devices are blocked from Android Market movie rentals; Is Google closing the door on “Open”?

It looks like Google is blocking rooted devices from the new Android Market movie rental service. Google is claiming the reason is due to requirements related to copy protection.

Rooting is all about the “openness” of Android. I am not going to go into a rant on Google closing the door on “open” because we don’t know enough. I just can’t imagine that Google came up with this on their own. There has to be something with the movie studios. Yes, Netflix is working on jailbroken IPhones, but that is a different platform.

We also know that Google Music is not what Google wanted it to be. They wanted to be able to sell music on top of cloud services, but they were unable to get deals done with the labels. Could this be one of the issues with the music industry as well?

It is also likely that the developer community will figure a way around this anyway. Stay tuned, we will let you know more as it develops.

Rooted devices are blocked from Android Market movie rentals; Is Google closing the door on “Open”?


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Rooted devices are blocked from Android Market movie rentals; Is Google closing the door on “Open”?

It looks like Google is blocking rooted devices from the new Android Market movie rental service. Google is claiming the reason is due to requirements related to copy protection.

Rooting is all about the “openness” of Android. I am not going to go into a rant on Google closing the door on “open” because we don’t know enough. I just can’t imagine that Google came up with this on their own. There has to be something with the movie studios. Yes, Netflix is working on jailbroken IPhones, but that is a different platform.

We also know that Google Music is not what Google wanted it to be. They wanted to be able to sell music on top of cloud services, but they were unable to get deals done with the labels. Could this be one of the issues with the music industry as well?

It is also likely that the developer community will figure a way around this anyway. Stay tuned, we will let you know more as it develops.

Rooted devices are blocked from Android Market movie rentals; Is Google closing the door on “Open”?


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Amazon MP3 Update Includes Lock-screen Controls and Playback Enhancements – Bug Fixes for XOOM

Amazon and their MP3 cloud player are still truckin’ along even with the music industry showing their displeasure over the service’s surprise arrival.  They pushed out an update last night that includes lock-screen controls (a must-have for music players), playback enhancements, and fixes for the XOOM.  At this point, I’m just wondering why you would [...]

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4shared Music app lets you stream cloud-based music

When cloud storage, file sharing, and media streaming come together, it’s usually a thing of beauty. Two weeks ago one such site, 4shared.com, released an Android app that allows users to manage their accounts. But that was just the start. Now, via Android Central, we learn that they’ve released a dedicated 4shared Music app, which will give you another way to find and stream music on your Android. Because it’s a file sharing service, it does give you the opportunity to expand your music library.

With the 4shared Music app you can search around to find songs you like, and then addd them to playlists. That way you can stream songs without having to search for them every time. According to the reviews you can’t download music from others, which makes sense. There are so many issues surrounding music file sharing, but it seems that straight downloads are a pretty big no-no.

Services such as this are going to gain more prominence, especially as 4G networks become more widespread. The music industry will probably have something to say about that, but when the dust settles I’m certain that cloud-based storage and streaming services will play a big part in how we experience music.

Anyway, here’s a quick video tutorial on the app. You get 10GB, so happy streaming.

This post originated at AndGeeks.com – home to all things Android! Also a great source of info about Android Phones.

4shared Music app lets you stream cloud-based music

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Google Music Internal Testing has Begun?

According to “music industry sources,” Google has started internal testing of Google Music which has everyone speculating that the service is almost ready for prime time.  Employees are apparently running around using the service, one that resembles the mysterious syncing we saw from the leaked music app a few weeks ago.  There is a good [...]

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