Posts Tagged RGB

Sensordrone: Even the Name Has My Attention

It seems I have stumbled upon yet another wonderful gadget for Android!  I have to say this one is going to be a hard to beat my friends.  Sensordrone.  To me it sounds like some fancy new Star Wars aircraft or a UFC fighter.  “Now entering the ring…the undefeated SENSORDRONE!!!”  All I have to say is, I wish I had gotten in on this Kickstart idea.  It’s absolutely amazing!  It’s a rather bland looking device that fits on your keychain and uses your Android and “Those we do not speak of” devices to send data collected from gas lines, the crisper in your fridge, humidity in the babies room, weather outside, the list goes on and on!
So what exactly is Sensordrone and what does it do?  Sensordrone uses built in sensors to relay data anywhere you go, such as the breathalyzer sensor to determine you BAC, and since it’s an extension of your smartphones internet, you can share vital data with your social sites.  You have full control of over LED colors and timing, which sensors are on and how often to collect data, along with different modes such as Call-Respond Mode for the most recent data, Streaming Mode to keep sending real time data, and Data Logging Mode which stores data in memory until called upon to download and export to a .csv file.  Sensordrone is meant to extend and not duplicate your device so you won’t see magnetic or motion sensors.

The included sensors are:

• Precision Electrochemical Gas Sensor
Calibrated for Carbon Monoxide, Alcohol, Hydrogen and others
• Gas Sensor for Oxidizing Gases
MOS type for Chlorine, Ozone, Nitrogen Dioxide, and others
• Gas sensor for Reducing Gases
MOS type for Methane, Propane, alcohols, other hydrocarbons
• Temperature
Simple resistance temperature sensor type
• Humidity
• Pressure
Barometer, Altimeter, Blood Pressure, etc
• Non-Contact Thermometer
Infrared sensor for scanning object temperature
• Proximity Capacitance
Fluid level, intrusion detection, stud finder
• RGB Color Intensity
• Illumination
Combine RGB and illumination for color matching
• Digital and Analog Interface
Expansion connector for connecting anything you want to your mobile device through the Sensordrone

All sensors are enclosed in a unique, fully custom plastic and metal housing that fits on your keychain and can be used wirelessly via internet or Bluetooth.  I could go on and on about this nifty little device but we would be here all day.  If you would like more information and a few videos detailing everything I missed, please link to the official Kickstart site http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/453951341/sensordrone-the-6th-sense-of-your-smartphoneand-be

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PhoneSuit announces the Lightplay, an Android-powered handheld media projector

PhoneSuit just announced the Lightplay, which is an Android-powered handheld media projector. They are marketing it as cross between an Android tablet and a pico video projector. It will project a screen of up to 80 inches diagonally and will support up to 1080p video.

It will sport Android 2.3, which I know is probably a disappointment to most of you, but hey this isn’t a phone so does it really matter? Most importantly it will have the Play Store so you can play your favorite games, movies, and other apps on the 80-inch projected screen. Yes that means Bad Piggies, Netflix, and Facebook, among others. If you’re wondering how you will play those games or control those apps, it comes with a wireless keyboard and motion controller featuring a 3 axis gyroscope.

It’s pretty compact as it comes in at 4.92 x 2.87 x 1.38 inches, and it weighs 230 grams. The Lightplay will start shipping November 1 and they are taking pre-orders now on their website for $499. Just hit the source link to get your order in.

Full specs:

  • Projector Technology: LCoS, RGB LED
  • Light Source: RGB LED (up to 30,000 hours lifetime)
  • Brightness: 50 Lumens
  • Screen Size: Up to 80 inches diagonal
  • Native Video Resolution:  1024×600 (supports HD 1080p, 720p content)
  • Integrated WiFi: 802.11 b/g/n
  • Processor:  1 Ghz ARM Cortex with NEON co-processor
  • Memory: 8 GB Internal flash (Expandable)
  • Controller: Wireless keyboard & motion controller with 3 axis gyroscope.
  • Operating System: Android 2.3 Gingerbread (Future upgrades available)
  • Input ports: HDMI input, AV input, 2 USB ports
  • Built-in Speaker
  • Weight: 230 grams
  • Dimensions: 125 x 73 x 35mm

 

 

source: PhoneSuit


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Quick screen comparison: Galaxy Note 2 versus Galaxy S3

Android Central

Samsung's Galaxy Note 2 ushers in the post-PenTile era

In the past, most SuperAMOLED smartphone screens have used a "PenTile" matrix pattern for the subpixels that make up each dot on the display. This pattern of tiny LEDs in an RGBG (red, green, blue, green) layout can improve battery life compared to regular RGB, but may also be prone to discolored whites and jagged edges in text and other UI elements. The difference isn't always pronounced — the Galaxy S3, for example, has one of the better-looking PenTile displays we've tested. However, in the past it's been a compromise you've had to deal with if you want a Samsung phone with a bright, high-contrast SuperAMOLED screen.

The Galaxy Note 2 is a bit different. Samsung's latest 5.5-inch monster phone makes a clean break from the PenTile past, introducing in an HD SuperAMOLED display with a more traditional RGB subpixel arrangement (the kind used in most LCD displays). That results in more subpixels making up each individual pixel, and in a more regular pattern. And that means there's less discoloration and sharper lines on-screen.

Interestingly, the Note 2's RGB subpixel arrangement isn't quite a standard RGB stripe — it's got a red and green subpixel stacked on top of each other, with a larger (but darker) blue subpixel to the left. There's been some speculation that this setup allows for extra longevity, as blue AMOLEDs tend to burn out more quickly than other colors — and so a larger, darker blue subpixel would last longer. We've yet to see any official confirmation of this theory, but at the very least, the larger blue subpixel doesn't seem to adversely affect color balance on the Note 2.

We've included an example of two icons above to show some of the differences. On the Galaxy S3 there are noticeably fewer subpixels making up the image, and some noticeable greenish-blue discoloration. The RGB-toting Note 2 produces a much sharper, more natural image. For a more detailed view, click the image above for an expanded view.

Needless to say our time with the Galaxy Note 2 has us excited for the future of AMOLED displays. If you find yourself anywhere near a Note 2 in-store demo unit anytime soon, you'll definitely want to check it out for yourself.

More: SLCD, SAMOLED, PenTile, RGB – Does it matter?

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[New App] SwatchMatic Creates Live, Automatic Color Swatches From Your Smartphone Camera – Plus Robots

unnamedSo you’re a graphic designer who’s constantly inspired by the colors around you. That’s fine and dandy, but just try putting “that sort of yellow-orange I saw on the aspen leaves in Durango last Saturday” into Dreamweaver and see what happens. Well, chromatically frustrated artists, we have a solution for you. SwatchMatic takes a look at the colors streaming into your Android smartphone’s camera, and creates live, continually shifting dynamic color palettes from the relevant scene. Tap on the screen and you get your palette, output in HSV, RGB, and WEB values. It’s a neat little color tool, and best of all, it’s free.

Official Android Police t-shirts are now on sale, with over 25 designs to call yours.

Done With This Post? You Might Also Like These:

[New App] SwatchMatic Creates Live, Automatic Color Swatches From Your Smartphone Camera – Plus Robots was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Sony announces next-gen Exmor RS image sensors for mobile devices

Android Central

Sony has announced its next generation of smartphone and tablet image sensors, dubbed 'Exmor RS.' Succeeding the company's current line-up of Exmor R sensors, Exmor RS will utilize a stacked CMOS sensor with a standard RGB coding, compared to earlier models which required additional detectors for white light in addition to red, green and blue.

Expected to make its debut in October, Exmor RS will come in three flavors — two 8MP units, and a higher-end 13MP unit. In addition, Sony says it's developed new f/2.2 lenses to go with its new image sensors, opening the door to higher-quality HDR (high dynamic range) video recording on mobile devices.

Given the timing of this announcement, we don't expect to see Exmor RS used in any of the Sony phones to be announced at next week's IFA press conference on Aug. 29. instead, we'll be looking for the tech in the next generation of Sony phones in early 2013.

Source: Sony (Japanese), via: Engadget

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Supposed Samsung Galaxy Note 2 Photo Leaks, Looks Awfully Similar To The Galaxy S III In Design

 

So much for all that mystery and uncertainty surrounding the upcoming Samsung Galaxy Note 2 (N7100) smartphone. Our friends at GSMArena obtained a supposed leaked photo which highlights the device’s front panel. While it’s not certain if the photo is real or not, the device you see pretty much matches up with earlier rumors indicating the Galaxy Note 2 would channel its inner Galaxy S III. Moreover, GSMArena reports its source included some Galaxy Note 2 features which also lines up with what we’ve reported before. The Galaxy Note 2 will feature a 1280 x 800 Super AMOLED RGB display on a 5.5-inch screen, 1.5GHz quad-core Exynos processor and Ice Cream Sandwich out of the box. And speaking of Ice Cream Sandwich– it’s also of note that Samsung just about has its Jelly Bean update ready and will release the update for the Galaxy S III alongside the Galaxy Note 2 announcement on August 29th.

source: GSMArena


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Here we go again: Dubious render claims to show Galaxy Note 2

Android Central

Just as it was with the Galaxy S3, here we have our first allegedly leaked render of Samsung's next, next big thing, the Galaxy Note 2. It's a large, white phone with an S3-like three-button setup, and a 16:10 aspect ratio screen. And… that's it. There's not much to go on here, and we have to say this bears all the hallmarks of fabricated or fan-made mockup. (When's the last time we saw an official promo shot of a sexy new phone with a blank screen?)

GSMArena, which was sent the image anonymously, says its source reports a familiar set of rumored specs for the device, including a 5.5-inch SuperAMOLED+ (RGB) display, an 8MP camera and a slightly higher-clocked Exynos 4 Quad chip. At this stage we'd be surprised if the Note 2 strayed too far from this spec list, but that does nothing to confirm the accuracy of the image.

So this might be the Galaxy Note 2, but really, it's probably not. The abundance of bullcrap Galaxy S3 renders in the run up to that phone's release has left us jaded and skeptical. Whatever the case, stay tuned for the real thing in a couple of weeks, as we'll be live from Berlin for the second Samsung Mobile Unpacked event of the year, where the real Note 2 will make its debut.

Source: GSMArena

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Rumor: Samsung Galaxy Note 2 Will Feature A Flexible UBP AMOLED Display

 

The Samsung Galaxy S III may be the hottest smartphone in the land at this time, but the upcoming Galaxy Note 2 may end up being the most innovative device of the year. While we reported the upcoming device may or may not feature a flexible Unbreakable Plane Display (UBP), the Korea IT Times reports Galaxy Note 2 will indeed utilize a flexible UBP display… contrary to some speculated rumors indicating otherwise. The thought here is that the UBP display technology will not only allow for possibly a bigger and better battery, but also allow for possibly a better RGB AMOLED display capable of supporting even more detailed pixels per inch (ppi)– specifically around 350ppi, which would give make the display higher than even Apple’s iPhone 4S with Retina Display. That’s certainly not a bad way to make use of what is expected to be the device’s 5.5-inch screen.

Sure this may be pure speculation and there’s nothing official from Samsung (yet), but boy— you gotta admit the Galaxy Note 2 sure is being hyped up to be the phone of 2012. Stay tuned with Talk Android for any further or additional developments regarding the device.

source: Korea IT Times


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Galaxy Note 2 reported to use flexible AMOLED panel

Android Central

Samsung's flexible AMOLED displays, long demonstrated to slack-jawed journos at trade shows, could be about to find its place in an upcoming smartphone, if reports from South Korea are accurate. In a recent article on the latest AMOLED display innovations, the Korea IT Times reports that the Galaxy Note 2, due to be unveiled in Berlin on Aug. 29, will utilize the bendy display tech. In addition, Samsung's new, thinner Unbreakable Plane (UBP) tech is also said to be used in the Note 2, freeing up space for extra battery capacity. That's interesting given that just a month ago the Korean press was reporting that UBP was off the table for the Note 2.

These rumors, combined with recent reports of RGB AMOLED displays reaching pixel densities of 350ppi, make for encouraging reading, suggesting that Samsung's upcoming stylus-toting smartphone may usher in a host new display technologies. In particular, the reported use of flexible AMOLED, might suggest some sort of curved device encompassing a curved screen. Samsung has dabbled with curved glass in its phones before (e.g. Nexus S, Galaxy Nexus), so it's possible the Note 2 might develop these ideas further by curving the AMOLED display beneath. (It should go without saying that the actual phone itself won't bend.)

We still know almost nothing about the Galaxy Note 2, but rumored specs suggest it'll sport a 5.5-inch, 16:9 display, up from the 5.3 inches of the original Note. Whatever form it takes, we'll be live from Berlin on the 29th to bring you full coverage of the next Galaxy Note, so keep it locked to AC.

Source: Korea IT Times

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Samsung Rumored To Have Galaxy Note Follow-Up In The Works, Will Feature Exynos 5250 Processor And 5.5-Inch Screen

The Samsung Galaxy Note is not only one of the most innovative Android devices ever, it’s also one of the most successful too. Samsung realized it found a winning formula and may have plans for its successor to be released later in the year. According to the International Business Times, the Galaxy Note follow-up is poised to be bigger and better than the first… literally. Instead of featuring the 5.3-inch screen from the original, the Galaxy Note 2 is expected to have a 5.5-inch Super AMOLED WSXGA screen with a resolution of 1050 x 1680 and 360 ppi. Samsung’s reasoning for featuring a Super AMOLED screen? Compared to RGB AMOLED Plus displays, the Super AMOLED display has topnotch durability and power-efficiency. Speaking of power efficiency, the upcoming smartphone is also expected to feature Sammy’s dual-core Exynos 5250 processor. This powerhouse chip is not only expected to be clocked at speeds up to 2.0GHz, but it’s expected to double the performance of existing 1.5GHz Cortex-A9 processors. In addition, the chip is more than capable of handling the Galaxy Note 2′s display as it’s designed to support high resolution WQXGA (2500 x 1600) displays.

The Galaxy Note 2 is also expected be similar in design to the Galaxy S III, while coming with premium bells and whistles too. It will likely arrive with more RAM (1.5GB is expected) and also feature an 8MP camera like the original. While 8MP may sound a bit disappointing, the Galaxy Note 2 is expected to feature an improved lens and sensors which will result in improved photographs and video. And like the recently-released Galaxy S III, the Galaxy Note 2 will likely feature S Beam, S Voice, Near Field Communication (NFC) and Smart Stay.

Just when we thought the hoopla with the Galaxy S III saga was over, we now have the possible mystery and excitement hovering over what looks to be the Galaxy Note 2. Make sure you stay tuned with Talk Android as we will continue to share news as we get it.

source: International Business Times


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Sharp shows off IGZO LCD and OLEDs including a 13.5-inch QFHD screen

Sharp shows off IGZO LCD and OLEDs including a 13.5-inch QFHD screen

Sharp announced earlier this year that it was starting to crank out LCD panels based on new indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) technology and now it’s ready to show some off at the Society for Information Display show in Boston. Currently sized for phones and tablets, the first prototypes include a pair of LCDs, one a 4.9-inch 720×1280 display, and the other coming at 6.1-inches with a resolution of 2560×1600. As an example of what will be possible further down the line, it also has a pair of OLED panels, one 13.5-inch 3840×2160 QFHD panel based on White OLEDs with RGB color filters (similar to the LG HDTV recently introduced), and a flexible 3.4-inch 540×960 screen (shown above). According to Sharp the new tech means screens with higher resolutions, lower power consumption, narrower bezels and higher performance touch screens because it enables even smaller thin-film transistors than the ones currently in use. The Associated Press reports it expects to apply the upgrade to production lines in this fiscal year, for now you can hit the source link for a few diagrams and examples of crystalline structures or check the gallery for pics of the other displays.

Sharp shows off IGZO LCD and OLEDs including a 13.5-inch QFHD screen originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 01 Jun 2012 03:55:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Samsung Says They Chose PenTile For Galaxy S3 To Help Display Quality Last Longer

This image has no alt text

 

Before the Samsung Galaxy S3 was announced, many had suspected that the device would feature a SAMOLED Plus HD display, only to find out Samsung opted for the same Pentile HD display found in the Galaxy Nexus. Their reasoning? The screen will last longer.

Samsung’s Philip Berne explained to Mobile Burn their reasoning behind this. Apparently, this is because of the way Pentile displays feature more green subpixels than blue ones (blue degrades quickest over time), meaning overall, screen quality will degrade less over time. So, after 3 years, mom’s 4.8-inch Super AMOLED HD display will look just as gorgeous as the day she bought it (and possibly better than the competition’s traditional RGB stripe displays).

It’s possible Samsung is merely trying to play off their use of Pentile as a “benefit” to consumers. I wouldn’t be surprised if next year, Sammy goes with SAMOLED Plus as a killer feature in the Galaxy S4.

What do you guys think? Is Pentile no longer a problem on small, HD resolution displays? Or do you suffer from special eyes (like me)?

[MobileBurn]


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Super AMOLED HD Plus Display Will Have Greenish Inclination

If everything goes well, on May, 3 in London we are going to see the official announcement of the Samsung Galaxy S III. According to the rumors and supposition, it will be the most advanced smart-phone on the mobile marker with the greatest features, possibilities and productivity. But there will be one thing that will not only make it better but will also help its future owners to save power. Samsung is said to be using phosphorescent green for the pixels in its alleged Super AMOLED HD Plus screen that is to grace the Galaxy S III. This new technology should help Samsung to reduce power consumption when displaying white because of the greenish inclination. According to the latest rumors, the Galaxy S III will have a 4.6-inch touch-screen display with true 319ppi pixel density thanks to the regular RGB matrix which should definitely make it shine in every weather conditions and in every life situations.

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External storage capacity, SLCD, SAMOLED, Pentile, RGB does it matter? [From the Forums]

Android Central

We've been rolling out Android news all day for everyone and even managed to get ourHTC One V review up for you all. If you missed out on anything, get caught up both here on the blogs and in the Android Central forums:

If you're not already a member of the Android Central forums, you can register your account today.

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Lumia 900 hits Carphone Warehouse, possibly coming to the UK in June

Nokia Lumia 900

We bet some of you over in the UK were just a wee bit little jealous when it was revealed that we here in the good ol’ U-S-of-A would be getting first dibs on the Lumia 900 (a little payback for keeping the 800 all to yourselves). Well, lucky for you, we’re not so greedy and you’ll get your own shot at Nokia’s latest and greatest… eventually. Carphone Warehouse has the dual-camera sporting Mango phone listed as “coming soon” with an expected launch date of June 2012. These plans are clearly still unofficial at the moment, but you can sign up for more info from the outlet as it becomes available. The biggest question, though, is whether or not the Lumia 900 will ship with LTE on board. The product page makes no mention of 4G and, with compatible networks still in trial stages at best, we wouldn’t get our hopes up. Still, even without “blazingly fast” downloads, the front-facing cam, RGB matrix screen and beefy battery present plenty of reason for excitement.

Lumia 900 hits Carphone Warehouse, possibly coming to the UK in June originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 24 Jan 2012 04:04:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink WPCentral, The Verge  |  sourceCarphone Warehouse  | Email this | Comments

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Nokia confirms Lumia 900 doesn’t have Pentile display

Nokia Twitter

While we knew the Lumia 900 would have “Clear Black” AMOLED display, what we didn’t know was whether it would sport a Pentile Matrix layout (like the Lumia 800). Well, fret no more friends, it’s official — the Lumia 900 has a full battery of subpixels in an RGB array. Nokia confirmed as such earlier via it’s US Twitter account in reply to a user’s inquiry. Between LTE and the RGB panel it looks like Nokia has its first genuinely lust-worthy Mango device on its hands.

Nokia confirms Lumia 900 doesn’t have Pentile display originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 11 Jan 2012 23:59:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink The Verge  |  sourceNokia (Twitter)  | Email this | Comments

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LG Spectrum cranks out the Verizon LTE, coming January 19th for $200

We had a pretty strong hunch that the LG Spectrum, a rumored Verizon LTE handset, would stop by CES to say hello, and sure ’nuff, here it is. The new device is coming out on January 19th for $200, and has a lot to love: it offers a 4.5-inch HD (1280 x 720) IPS display utilizing RGB, a Qualcomm 1.5GHz dual-core CPU, 8MP camera in the back with LED flash and 1080p video capture, a 1.3MP front-facing cam and HDMI mirroring with MHL. Verizon’s boasting the Spectrum as the first and only device that features ESPN ScoreCenter content in HD, as well as a SmartMovie HD app that lets you create and edit videos directly on the phone. What about Ice Cream Sandwich? Nope, not yet. The Spectrum sports Gingerbread for now, but it should get the upgrade sometime in the first half of 2012. Given that most top-notch 4G phones on Verizon debuted at $300 in 2011, we’d say this is a breath of fresh air for anyone who wants some good specs. Check out all the details in the press release below.

Continue reading LG Spectrum cranks out the Verizon LTE, coming January 19th for $200

LG Spectrum cranks out the Verizon LTE, coming January 19th for $200 originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 09 Jan 2012 12:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Samsung Galaxy Nexus rocks a PenTile Matrix display

There has been plenty abuzz about Samsung and Google’s latest and greatest, the Galaxy Nexus, but one thing we haven’t heard talked about much is the display. Yes it is amazingly gorgeous coming in at 4.65″ and having a large 1280 x 720p resolution, but we’ve had many questions and comments asking about the panel type. Yes the Samsung Galaxy Nexus uses a Pentile Matrix display but don’t worry it still looks great. What is the difference between RGB and PenTile you ask? All the details are after the break.

How this works is the way the pixels are displayed on the screen. For an example the original Galaxy S used the Super AMOLED display and while it looked awesome, used a PenTile display where each sub-pixel shares colors instead of getting their very own. This not only makes the display a little on the fuzzy side but it also gives the screen that blue hue, as well as the color green being a little underwhelming. The Galaxy S II however, uses the newer Super AMOLED Plus from Samsung and the “Plus” is Samsung’s way of saying they are using a full RGB color display instead of the cheaper PenTile that shares colors and pixels. The image below is a perfect example of this:

The device might be old but this same situation was a big deal when the original Google Nexus One was released and you can see those images by clicking here. No Samsung didn’t forget to add the “Plus” to the new Galaxy Nexus rocking Ice Cream Sandwich, in order to achieve that high 1280 x 720 resolution and keep the awesome colors and contrast of an AMOLED panel they had to compromise a bit. So why does this matter? Using the PenTile in real world scenarios for users will result in slightly less detail and a loss of sharpness, not to mention the color hue we talked about earlier.

Is this a bad thing or a game changer? I don’t think so. For those with eagle eye vision they may be able to spot the differences, but one thing the Galaxy Nexus has going for it is the higher resolution. The 1280 x 720 resolution offers a much higher pixel density close to that of the iPhone’s “Retina” display. So all the pixels are that much smaller and crisper, so while we do have a PenTile display on board the screen should still look gorgeous. The cons of the PenTile will be much less noticeable on the higher resolution the Galaxy Nexus comes with compared to, say, the original Galaxy S that sports a 800 x 480 resolution.

Obviously I would’ve loved to see the Galaxy Nexus come with a Super AMOLED Plus full RGB display and the high resolution, because anyone would, but I’m perfectly fine with the PenTile for now and will gladly pick up the Nexus come launch day. In case you missed any of our coverage of the new superphone feel free to check out our Galaxy Nexus and Ice Cream Sandwich portals just linked to, then watch our hands-on videos seen below and decide for yourself if the screen is beautiful or not.

Galaxy Nexus hands-on

Ice Cream Sandwich hands-on

Device Specifications and Information
Device Info

    Device Name : GALAXY Nexus
    Manufactuer : Samsung
    Carrier : Verizon
    Announced Date : October 18, 2011
    Release Date : TBA
    Also Known As : Nexus Prime

Display

  • Screen Size : 4.65 Inch
  • Resolution : 1280×720
  • Screen Type : Super AMOLED
Dimension & Weight

  • Height : 5.33 Inch
  • Width : 2.67 Inch
  • Depth : 0.35 Inch
  • Weight : 135 Grams
Battery & Power
    Battery Type:
  • Lithium Ion
  • Battery Capacity : 1750 mAh
  • Talk Time : NA
  • Stand By Time : NA
Software
    Android OS:
  • 4.0.x
    Audio Playback:
  • AAC
  • AAC+
  • AMR
  • MID
  • MP3
  • WAV
  • WMA
    Video Playback:
  • h.263
  • h.264 / AVC
  • MPEG-4 (MP4)
    Messaging:
  • SMS
  • MMS

Hardware

    CPU : OMAP 4460
    CPU Clock Speed : 1200 Mhz
    Core : 2
    Ram : 1000 MB
    Internal Storage : 32 GB
    Front Facing Camera :
    Camera Resolution :5 MP
    Camera Features:
  • Auto focus
  • Flash
  • 1080p Video Recording
    Sensors:
  • Accelerometer
  • Ambient light
  • Proximity
    QWERTY :
Cellular Network
    Network Technology:
  • GSM
  • CDMA
    GSM Band:
  • 850
  • 900
  • 1800
  • 1900
    CDMA Band:
  • 900
  • 1900
Device Connectivity
    Wi-Fi:
  • 802.11b
  • 802.11g
  • 802.11n
    Bluetooth:
  • Bluetooth 3.0
    Location Features:
  • Compass
  • GPS
  • Cellular location
  • Wi-Fi location
    FM Radio :
    NFC :

[via FlatPanelsHD]

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The Galaxy Nexus’ Super AMOLED display is a minus, not a Plus

For all the buzz around Samsung’s latest hi-def smartphone, the absence of one little word has largely been glossed over. That word is “Plus” — the wizened Galaxy S II has a “Super AMOLED Plus” display, for example, whereas the sparkly Galaxy Nexus is merely “Super AMOLED.” Did the marketeers simply forget those extra hyperbolic keystrokes, or does the difference actually mean something?

Well, regrettably, it does. Samsung uses “Plus” to refer to full RGB displays, in which each pixel possesses its own trio of red, green and blue sub-pixels. Meanwhile, a non-Plus display uses a cheaper PenTile system — which forces pixels to share each other’s sub-pixels. Aside from potential hygiene issues, this results in a lower overall sub-pixel density, reduced sharpness and worse color rendition. We saw the difference clearly enough when Engadget Spanish microscopically compared the original non-Plus Galaxy S against the GS II, and now the folks at FlatPanelsHD have undertaken a more up-to-date comparison at the source link. The upshot? They calculated that, despite its 4.65-inch screen size, the Galaxy Nexus has the same number of sub-pixels as the 3.5-inch iPhone 4/4S. Think of a word with no r, g or b in it, and you eventually arrive at “disappointed.”

Update: We just added AnandTech‘s analysis at the More Coverage link. They point out that if you like the pixel density on the GS II, you should be happy with that on the Galaxy Nexus — although they don’t address color rendition.

[Thanks, Mauro]

The Galaxy Nexus’ Super AMOLED display is a minus, not a Plus originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 21 Oct 2011 05:40:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Samsung’s HD Displays to Deploy PenTile Matrix Technology

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When Samsung introduced their Galaxy S II flagship, one of the biggest enhancement over its predecessor was the inclusion of a Super AMOLED Plus display. The differentiating factor between the two was the move from a PenTile matrix display to a screen that featured true RGB pixels, providing a much smoother representation of color and increased clarity. However, with the announcement of their behemoth Samsung Galaxy Note and its 5.3-inch HD display, the Korean manufacturer has arguably taken a step back in terms of screen technology. While screen resolution is improved in the Note and the recently announced Samsung Galaxy S II HD thanks to the new Super AMOLED HD display, the absence of the “Plus” modifier indicates a regression back to PenTile technology.

PenTile displays work by assigning only two colored subpixels to each pixel, rather than three RGB subpixels as found in the Galaxy S II and its Super AMOLED Plus screen. With a PenTile matrix screen, certain colors must be approximated by combining the subpixels of two adjacent pixels, creating colors that don’t read as true and images with sharply crosshatched edges under close examination. If that all seems confusing, the basic takeaway is that a PenTile screen effectively only displays images at half the advertised resolution.

PenTile displays recently deployed by Motorola have faced scrutiny for the above mentioned problems, but initial reviews of the Galaxy Note don’t seem to attribute the same issues to the oversized handset’s display. Perhaps this is due to the increased HD resolution masking some of the issues normally associated with screens deploying PenTile matrix technology. For better or worse, it would seem this same display will find its way to the Samsung Galaxy Nexus. Perhaps we will simply have to wait for the Samsung Galaxy S III for a proper Super AMOLED HD Plus display.

[via thegadgetlife | Thanks, Abir]

 


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@AndroidSPIN Store – Samsung AV Cable for Galaxy Tab 10.1, Galaxy Tab

Product Description

Connect your Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 or Galaxy Tab to your TV with this Original Samsung AV Cable. The 30 pin to composite video cable will allow you to connect your Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 or Galaxy Tab to your television or projector easily.

This will enable you to watch videos and picture slideshows stored on your device. Connecting the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 or Galaxy Tab to your TV or projector with this cable will also allow you to use the sound from your television or surround sound system to give a richer, fuller sound.

Features:
Watch video, stream media, and view documents through your TV
A must have accessory for those who would like to watch videos and work on the big screen
The cable gets the video signal out through RGB standard output
Comes with Left, Right Audio and Video Connection
Factory manufactured product from Samsung

Works with: Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1, Galaxy Tab

Not much for me to really say about this accessory other than you should have one. What better way to get ultimate enjoyment out of your recently purchased Galaxy Tab 10.1, then hooking it up to your big screen TV. You can find this cable and many others in the AndroidSPIN Store.

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1280×720 Super AMOLED HD Display

It is impossible to stop technological progress and I am very happy about this fact. You might have already heard that Samsung has advanced their manufacturing process far enough to bring Super AMOLED HD to a phone sized screen. This is really great because now with the same screen resolution you will be getting better and smoother picture. We have already mentioned that Samsung is going to release a 4.5-inch smart-phone at 1280×720 Super AMOLED HD resolution capacity. While this information was not proved by Samsung itself, leaked facts give us a possibility to draw the whole picture. Samsung will be producing 720p Super AMOLED HD displays using the old style RGBG pentile matrix technology. Some time after, they plan to produce an RGB stripe version that will give a possibility to create a Super AMOLED HD Plus display, having the same improvements we saw with the move from Super AMOLED to Super AMOLED Plus. Sounds inspiring? Stay tuned for updates.

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@AndroidSPIN Store – @HTC AV Cable for Droid Incredible

Product Description

Now you can stream media, watch video, or view documents on your TV from your phone with this HTC AV Cable! Video signal is put out through RGB standard output while keeping your devices’ battery charging.

This cable also features an extra Micro-USB charging socket which is built into the side of the plug of the cable, so you can be sure your device stays charged.

Features:

  • Micro USB
  • Left, Right audio and Video RCA
  • In-line Ext Micro-USB charging socket on plug

Works with: HTC Droid Incredible

This handy little cord was created and designed with the particular thought for the rest of the world. As much as we would all like to believe that everyone has a great HD TV with oodles of input plugs, the reality of it is, they don’t. I Have a great LG 50″ in my living room, but I have an old, heavy, square, 32″ in my room. No HDMI, no RGB no nothing. It would be nice to stream a movie on my phone to my crappy TV. This would do the trick. Even though this states it is for the Droid Incredible, I would imagine it should work with any device that sports TV out functions via Micro-USB. This little accessory item sells for $29.99 retail, but we have it on special for $19.95. That is a 33% savings off full cost.

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Sony WhiteMagic LCD promises magic formula of better brightness, lower power

How do you make a brighter LCD without murdering battery life? Simple. Add a white pixel to each RGB trio, creating an RGBW panel that pumps out more nits without recourse to the backlight. We’ve already seen this technology in action on a tablet-sized screen from Samsung and Nouvoyance, and now Sony’s come up with an OEM 3-inch panel that it hopes will prove popular in smartphones and cameras. The VGA screen is claimed to double brightness without increasing power consumption compared to conventional panels. Alternatively, it has an outdoor mode which sacrifices this power-saving in favor of doubling brightness — although, when it comes to the sunlight problem, we’re still hoping that PixelQi’s approach will eventually come of age.

Sony WhiteMagic LCD promises magic formula of better brightness, lower power originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 10 Aug 2011 18:13:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Galaxy S II and Galaxy S screens compared at the subpixel level (video)

One Galaxy S II review not enough for you? Hey, we understand, a dual-core phone deserves at least two goes through the Engadget test chambers. Today marks the publication of our Engadget Spanish analysis, which, among other things, compares the GSII against its forebear, the Galaxy S, at the subpixel level. Yes, we’ve got video capturing the improvement Samsung has made in its new Real-Stripe (RGB) pixel arrangement on the Galaxy S II’s Super AMOLED Plus display over the older, less awesome PenTile RGBG layout of the Plus-deprived Super AMOLED panel. You can see it after the break or dive into the source link for a more comprehensive comparison. Non-Spanish speakers will want to jump to the 1:40 mark in the vid for all the microscopic action.

Continue reading Galaxy S II and Galaxy S screens compared at the subpixel level (video)

Galaxy S II and Galaxy S screens compared at the subpixel level (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 19 May 2011 10:42:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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10.1-inch WQXGA (2560 x 1600) Display

Despite all that technological stuff that we’ve noticed already, there are things that we start appreciating only after facing them in a real life. And when I say “facing”, I literally mean it. Things that I am going to talk about are displays and not regular ones but professional, high quality displays on Android devices and not only. Together with other manufacturers, Samsung is working on bringing the first 10.1-inch WQXGA (2560 x 1600) format PenTile RGBW tablet display. Ye, I know, 2560 x 1600 resolution sounds crazy but it is more real than you can imagine. Actually, things like that were already predicted and we were mentioning them a few months ago. Here is the official message from Dr. Sungtae Shin, Senior VP of Samsung Electronics:

Samsung’s PenTile display technology is the only display technology that operates at 40 percent less power yet provides twice that of Full HD-viewing performance for consumers compared to legacy RGB stripe LCDs. There is no other commercial display technology on the market today that offers this high of a resolution and pixel density in a 10.1-inch size display”.

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Samsung and Nouvoyance to demonstrate 10.1-inch, 300dpi WQXGA displays

Android Central

Just in case you’ve not noticed recently, display manufacturers have been working their butts off to mass produce high-quality display units for all of us technology hungry individuals. Samsung is no exception to that that, in fact Samsung is one of the leaders in display technologies and they’re getting ready to show off the industry’s first 10.1-inch WQXGA (2560 x 1600) format PenTile RGBW tablet display.

“Samsung’s PenTile display technology is the only display technology that operates at 40 percent less power yet provides twice that of Full HD-viewing performance for consumers compared to legacy RGB stripe LCDs. There is no other commercial display technology on the market today that offers this high of a resolution and pixel density in a 10.1-inch size display,” said Dr. Sungtae Shin, Senior VP of Samsung Electronics. 

So what does all this mean to consumers? Basically — we’re going to be getting some seriously high quality displays in some of the upcoming tablets. Luckily for us, those displays will be lighter and 40 percent more power-efficient. Which, is a great thing — that stuff leads to lighter, visually better and longer lasting tablets. Hit the break for the full press release and background info about  Samsung’s PenTile display technology.

Source: Business Wire
More: Nouvoyance, PenTile


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