Posts Tagged SDK

Vuzix releases the M100 Smart Glasses SDK emulator for app testing

Vuzix began showing off their Google Glass competitor back in November. At the time they offered some details in terms of the glasses, mainly covering the specs and the fact that they would eventually be opening them up for developers. Simply put, Vuzix was planning to release an SDK that allowed to developers to create apps for the glasses. And well, Vuzix has released the beginning stages of the SDK today.

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According to details coming from Vuzix, this release is Phase 1 and it will provide developers with the software required to start writing code using the PC emulator for Android. With this bit of the SDK available, developers will be able to begin writing as well as testing their apps.

The SDK will be available for new developers as well as those who were pre-registered and can be found in the Vuzix developer center at developer.vuzix.com. As part of the developer program, those involved will be able to get support, technical advice and regular updates as well as early access to the M100 smart glasses. Further details from Vuzix notes that the M100 SDK will be available in a Gold and Silver version and that these will be delivered in stages and include frequent updates.

Otherwise, developers and the SDK aside, the M100 smart glasses will be running Android and feature a built-in color display, integrated head tracker and GPS as well as a camera that will allow for the capture of still images and video. When the M100 smart glasses were originally announced, Vuzix had said that they would feature a WQVGA display with a 16:9 aspect ratio that gave the impression looking at a 4-inch display from 14-inches.

And while we have yet to see any public release date for the M100 smart glasses, Vuzix will have them on display during CES.

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OUYA Dev Consoles begin arriving and eager developers begin sharing details

Those OUYA Dev Consoles began shipping last week. And in addition to the consoles shipping, the developer SDK was also released. We were given a brief look at the console last week. If you remember back, that look came courtesy of the folks at OUYA who unboxed the unit and gave everyone a look at those translucent consoles.

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Moving past that first look and we are now seeing some developer made videos surfacing online. For example, we have a trio of videos coming from the folks at CodeZombieGames. The videos include an in-depth look at the pieces included in the box, an overview of the hookup process and an overview of the interface. Beginning first with what is included in the box. We saw some of this in the video from OUYA, however this one goes a bit further into detail, such as with the controller. For example, the controller is said to be light and easy to hold but that the plastic is “kind of in the middle” in terms of quality. Other points about the controller include how one battery slides in on each side and that the touchpad works “fairly well” but seems to be better for browsing as opposed to gaming.

Next video up was the hookup process. This is the shortest of the three videos coming in at just over 2 minutes in length. But on that note, the shorter video probably just means that there is little to discuss. Simply put, the OUYA console appears rather easy to set-up. You have the power and HDMI. Additionally, you also have the Wi-Fi or Ethernet, depending on the connectivity you choose to use. This video also shows the OUYA as it begins to turn on, which appears to be rather bright.

Moving over to the third of three videos and we have the longest — just over 17 minutes. The boot up process appears to be on the slower side, and also shows the note that this is a developer preview that is “not ready for gamers.” In other words, while this is an interesting video to watch, there will likely be some things that will be changing. The overall UI appears to be decent and easy enough to navigate — almost Windows Phone like. All said and done, these videos may just end up serving as a teaser for many considering the regular Kickstarter and pre-ordered units are not expected to begin arriving for a few more months — until March 2013.

[via SlashGear]

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Hands-on with Jolla’s Sailfish OS (video)

Handson with Jolla's Sailfish OS video

We recently had the chance to spend time with David Greaves and Vesa-Matti Hartikainen of Jolla and take Sailfish OS for a spin. As you might recall, this open source mobile OS builds upon Mer (a fork of MeeGo that includes Qt) and uses the Nemo framework with a custom UI. Like any decent Linux-based OS, it supports both ARM and x86 devices. The company is also behind the Sailfish SDK which is in the process of being finalized but is still open to developer feedback (the source code is available). After seeing Jolla’s various demo videos and noting some UI similarities with MeeGo (swipes) and, strangely, with BB10 (peek gestures), we were eager to experience Sailfish OS for ourselves.

If you’re wondering why the mobile OS is usually shown running on Nokia’s N950 developer handset, that’s because Jolla employs many ex-MeeGo engineers, so the OMAP-based phone was a natural fit. We were first given a walkthrough of Sailfish OS, then allowed to play with it. Many apps are still being worked on and some are still off-limits (we got in trouble for launching the camera), but what we saw was pretty solid. Take a look at the gallery below, then hit the break for our hands-on video and first impressions.

Continue reading Hands-on with Jolla’s Sailfish OS (video)

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OUYA Developer kits shipping today, could arrive tomorrow

The highly anticipated open-source game console OUYA developer kits are shipping sooner than expected, and today we’ve learned some lucky developers could be receiving theirs as soon as tomorrow. According to our good pals at SlashGear instead of the developer consoles shipping tomorrow, they’ve already sent many out and they’ll be arriving all weekend long.

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OUYA originally stated tomorrow, December 28th, they’d start shipping kits to developers who pre-ordered. Now however according to the OUYA forums some are actually receiving their units tomorrow, and all who pre-ordered will have their own Tegra 3 powered OUYA in hand before January 10th. What a perfect way to start the weekend and enter into 2013. Right?

OUYA was one of the most successful kickstarter campaigns of 2012, with more than 8.5 million in funding from excited backers. For those lucky developers that have one coming soon I’m sure all the early backers are eagerly awaiting their unit to arrive tomorrow, Saturday, or sometime early next week.

The official OUYA developer SDK is expected to be released tomorrow, which will be right on time for those who receive their console tomorrow as well. We are expecting tons of high profile games for the Android-powered Tegra 3 quad-core gaming console. Final Fantasy III will be launched, and earlier this month we detailed 10 new games coming soon. Expect some goodness from the OUYA, and let us know when yours arrives!

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‘Leaked’ BlackBerry 10 info shows video chat and screen sharing in BBM, new task manager

'Leaked' BlackBerry 10 info shows video chat and screen sharing in BBM, new task manager

Top dog at RIM Thorsten Heins heavily implied that video chat would be added to BBM when BlackBerry 10 showed up, and now possible confirmation of the feature has come from what are thought to be leaked presentation slides. Originating on CrackBerry’s forums, the images have been taken down on various sites, leading us to believe they’re legit and that strongly worded requests have led to their removal. Not only do they suggest BBM video chat is coming to BB10, but also the ability to screen share during these video calls. Another slide details a new task manager for the OS called “BlackBerry Remember,” which can sync with Outlook and — based on its description and what was uncovered in the gold SDK — may include Evernote integration. We’ve contacted RIM for comment and will update you with any response, but until then, take a look at the slide above and the pair hidden after the break to assess for yourself whether they’re the real deal.

Update: Here’s RIM’s statement, which doesn’t really come as much of a surprise:

“We understand that there is a lot of excitement for BlackBerry 10. We will launch the platform on January 30th and until then we won’t comment on speculation.”

Continue reading ‘Leaked’ BlackBerry 10 info shows video chat and screen sharing in BBM, new task manager

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Via: All About Phones

Source: CrackBerry (1), (2)

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Samsung releases version 1.0 of the AllShare Framework SDK

Samsung has recently released the AllShare Framework SDK, which in theory, could help to add features to third-party apps. You see, while Samsung has the AllShare apps, up until this point, third party developers were unable to add AllShare support in their apps. Anyway, with the release of this SDK, developers will be able to create AllShare-capable apps.

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The development and the apps that come as a result will be left up to the individual, however Samsung has said the the main features of the SDK include media sharing, screen sharing and control sharing. These are basically what the names imply. The media sharing will allow the user to share media stored on their device with another device. This sharing includes movies, music and images with other DLNA compatible devices.

The screen sharing will allow the user to share their display in real-time. The screen sharing will be shareable over any HDMI enabled TV using a dongle or Wi-Fi Display compatible device. Finally, the control sharing will be for things such as a remote.

Anyway, while there could be a wide variety of uses for these APIs, Samsung has managed to include the Smart TVs in all aspects. All that being said, with all the Samsung devices that have been sold over the recent months, it seems only logical to thing that there are more than a few developers that will be willing to create some useful AllShare-capable apps.

[via Samsung]

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Samsung AllShare SDK could bring better connected apps to your Galaxy

Samsung AllShare SDK could bring better connected apps to your Galaxy

Samsung’s AllShare apps are the only implementations of the company’s DLNA-based platform to date, but now it wants external developers to help realize the tech’s potential. The AllShare Framework SDK has been released, meaning its APIs can be integrated into third-party software for the creation of “AllShare-enabled” apps. Developers will be given access to AllShare features including media streaming, screen sharing with compatible devices (or an AllShare Cast dongle), and remote control functions. Now devs can start using these tools, expect to see more AllShare-enabled apps boosting the functionality of your Galaxy device in the near future.

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Via: Sammy Hub

Source: Samsung

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Samsung Releases AllShare Framework SDK 1.0, Lets Developers Share Things With Other Things… Or Something

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Samsung devices and sharing go together like Australian car racing and fistfights – you rarely see one without the other, in quantity (whether you like it or not). It makes sense, then, that Samsung wants to share its passion for sharing with developers. And today, it’s making that a little easier, with the initial release of the AllShare Framework SDK.

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What does AllShare do? That’s a pretty good question I can’t give a complete answer to. The SDK seems to focus squarely on AllShare’s inter-device operability and smart TV functionality, though, so it’s a good bet the SDK will help you utilize AllShare file sharing between Samsung devices, or code a 3rd-party remote control for compatible Samsung TV’s.

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Samsung Releases AllShare Framework SDK 1.0, Lets Developers Share Things With Other Things… Or Something was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Samsung Galaxy Note II: S-Pen Review [Part 1]

As you know, the S-Pen is one of the key features of the Samsung Galaxy Note II. I personally see the S-Pen features as the perfect fit for entrepreneurs out in the world. In most cases, entrepreneurs are constantly working and trying to get their business started up, and most entrepreneurs are always having good ideas. The S-Pen is an extremely handy tool for this type of person with them being so busy, as it is extremely easy to just pull the S-Pen out, jot down a note to think about at a later time, and then you won’t have to worry about forgetting the idea. This is just one of many ways that the S-Pen is extremely helpful with the Galaxy Note II specifically (if you didn’t know, the S-Pen is integrated in other Note products as well).

The S-Pen is an outstanding piece of hardware. It fits nicely in your hands, and really isn’t that large. It’s extremely easy to send text messages or emails with or more simply put: it’s extremely easy to write with in general. Consumers that are looking at the Galaxy Note II for writing down notes easily, looking for extra functionality in a smartphone or are just someone that wants to doodle in an app, the Galaxy Note II’s S-Pen features will fit perfectly. The S-Pen is very lightweight, it isn’t bulky and fits into the Note II’s S-Pen slot easily with little-to-no force needed. At first it seemed like a tool that I personally wouldn’t use a whole lot, but I find myself taking advantage of Samsung’s S-Pen apps a couple of times a day, specifically S Note.

The S-Pen isn’t “just” a stylus. It’s essentially its own piece of hardware integrated into Samsung’s Android-based TouchWiz interface. As a consumer, one may not think that the $299 (a good $699 or so depending if you’re going on a new contract or not) the Galaxy Note II currently costs is actually worth it. It’s okay to think that, as it is a subjective opinion, but people need to keep in mind that your getting a very large package for what you’re actually paying. The features that the S-Pen brings to the Galaxy Note II, to me, is worth a good $299 alone. The technology that is there is simply amazing, and the potential that developers have with the S-Pen SDK is even greater.

I do have a minor complaint about the S-Pen, but it’s really not about the S-Pen itself. It’s more of the fact that there does not seem to be a whole lot of developers on board with the idea of a S-Pen SDK, which is very unfortunate, as the S-Pen does have a lot of potential if developers got a hold of it. We may see some community-built S-Pen apps in the future, most likely when the price of the device itself goes down. For now though, I will keep an eye on S Suggest hoping a genius developer will come out of the woodwork with a great idea for the S-Pen.

Now, the question is: is the S-Pen worth the $299 or $699 that the consumer would pay for on the Galaxy Note II. That’s entirely up to the individual to decide. We all value different things differently. For me, the S-Pen alone was worth the price of the device, simply because of the potential that it has with the SDK and the apps that are already built-in with it.

Price Disclaimer
Prices are accurate as of less than 12 hours ago. Product prices and availability are subject to change. Any price and availablility information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of any products.

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Facebook SDK 3.0 leaves the beta stage and brings native login and more

Facebook seems to have been doing some good things for Android users lately. Of course, we saw those “droidfood” signs urging Facebook employees to begin using Android a little while back. Perhaps more important for the average user though, the Facebook for Android app was updated yesterday. And while Facebook made the push for the end user yesterday, it looks like they are making the push for developers today.

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This latest bit deals with the Facebook SDK for Android. Specifically, version 3.0. This was originally released in beta form about six weeks back. As of today, Facebook SDK 3.0 for Android is out of beta. Facebook has said that this SDK has been downloaded more than 80,000 times and that this will make it “easier to build social Android apps.”

As to what developers can expect here; a native Facebook login experience, Friend Picker, Places Picker and a Profile Picture control. These are all pretty much how they sound. The login will allow people to authorize permissions without leaving your app, the Friend Picker will allow users to tag friends, the Places Picker will allow users to choose nearby places and the Picture control will show the profile picture for any Facebook object to include people, places and things.

Otherwise, it was said that this release will simplify authentication and authorization, bring improved Facebook API support and allow you to measure clicks and installs for mobile app install ad. Bottom line here, this looks like good news for app developers looking to make use of Facebook. For the end-user, expect any apps with Facebook integration to get updates in the not to distant future.

[via Facebook Developers]

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Facebook SDK 3.0 for Android comes out of beta

Facebook SDK 3.0

Alongside its release of a native Android app, Facebook is bringing its SDK 3.0 for Android developers out of beta today. The Facebook SDK for Android lets app developers on the platform integrate social functions into their apps by calling Facebook API's and embedding their functions. This means simple actions like connecting a Facebook account to another app or calling up a friend or location list will be easier to implement and use. For example, users will be able to log-in to their Facebook account without ever leaving the primary app — really cool stuff.

Facebook says the beta version of the SDK was downloaded over 80,000 times since it was released, so let's hope that some of those developers give it a closer look and use the tools to their advantage. This isn't something most end-users will be dealing with, but we all want this regardless. When developers have better tools, they provide an improved experience for all of us.

Source: Facebook Developers

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Facebook takes SDK 3.0 for Android out of beta, brings native login and better API support

Facebook takes SDK 30 for Android out of beta, brings native login and better API support

Android developers seeking to piggyback on Facebook’s social network hooks should find that job easier now that its SDK 3.0 is out of beta. Facebook announced that the beta was downloaded over 80,000 times already in six weeks, and brings a slew of new features to the platform, just as it launches an improved version of its official app. Just like its counterpart on iOS, 3.0 lets users easily log into and authorize ties with their Facebook account without leaving the app they’re in, select and find friends who are also using said app, and select profile pics from their albums. Another feature that will be key for its relationships with developers is the ability to measure clicks and installs for mobile app install ads. If you’ve deactivated your account and / or are wary of the network’s growing influence across different outlets they may seem like more reasons to stay away, but interested developers have about a billion reasons to give it a shot.

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Source: Facebook Developer blog, SDK

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Google releases Maps for iOS – Should Apple or Android users be mad?

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After murmurings and whispers that Google was readying a doozy of a release for iOS users, tonight, Google has officially released their world famous Maps application into the Apple App Store. Built from the ground up, the new Maps for iOS features most everything Android users have been enjoying for years now, including voice-guided, turn-by-turn navigation, traffic conditions, Street View, over 80 million business listings with store hours, phone numbers, and more. Google really pulled out all the stops, ensuring iOS users got the full Maps experience (the one Apple didn’t want their users to have). What’s more is Google is providing an SDK for developers to implement Maps into their own apps — something Apple cannot be too happy about.

iOS users flocked to the App Store for Maps, crashing it in the process

My question to you guys is, do you think Google releasing Maps for iOS is more of a slap in the face to Apple, or to Android users? I’ve seen a lot of chatter on Twitter and the question many Android users are asking themselves is, “Why would Google release Maps — a shining jewel in the crown of Android — for a rival OS? Sounds like madness, right? No… this is Google.

Remember, the sole reason Google created Android in the first place as open software alternative to iOS was so that so that manufacturers from all around the world could put Android on the device of their choosing. All without the worry of licensing fees or hassle. Heck, OEM’s could even theme Android as they saw fit, themeing and transforming the mobile OS into something that was uniquely “theirs.” Almost like the Trojan Horse of lore, the motivation behind Android has always been about one thing: getting as many Google apps and services into as many consumers’ hands as possible.

Maps is iPhone-only for now. Not optimized for the iPad

Where your average Android fanboy wants nothing to do with Apple, Google isn’t so much concerned with their pride as they are with good business. Google knows Android already controls the market share with no signs of slowing down. Still, Apple’s iPhone has shown itself time, and time again, a hit with consumers and it only makes sense, from a business perspective, to reach that audience as well. Crazy you say? Crazy like a fox.

So, where some of you might get your feelings hurt at Google sharing — not taking away — one more thing with iOS users, this isn’t something that will soon change. Heck, Google would even release their apps for Windows Phone. You know, if they had any users that is.

[Google Blog]

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Blackberry 10 SDK reveals tight Evernote integration

Blackberry 10 SDK reveals tight Evernote integration

The Blackberry 10 gold SDK release has revealed an interesting tidbit for Evernote partakers: the memory-prodding app seems to be tightly enmeshed with RIM’s upcoming OS. It’s one of the so-called Notebook options listed under the “App Integration” heading, which let you organize “actionable and non-actionable items into separate folders or topics.” Evernote is listed as one of those options, and will let you sync up and access your account with Blackberry 10 devices, according to the documentation. That app is already available across all other major platforms, letting you organize documents with audio, video, photos, websites and, um, text — then sync everything up in the cloud. Considering Evernote’s recent foray into the business side of things, having the app built-in might be a nice pitch to RIM’s core userbase when the new OS is finally launched.

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Via: 89 apps

Source: Blackberry API

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RIM releases ‘gold’ build of its BB 10 SDK toolkit

RIM releases 'gold' build of its BB 10 SDK toolkit

RIM’s reached yet another milestone in the slow-going march to its big January 30th BB 10 reveal: its SDK toolkit has gone ‘gold’. Now, developers that’ve been courted by the Waterloo-based company at one of many BB Jam conferences around the globe can start building apps for the next-gen BlackBerry platform using final versions of APIs. As we learned back in May, devs interested in BB 10 will have the option to code natively for the unreleased OS using the Cascades framework, create HTML5-based “rich web applications” with WebWorks, or use the included toolset for Adobe AIR apps or Android ports. And just in case you were questioning industry support, RIM’s also included stats in its associated PR (furnished by Five Points Research) that paint a positive picture, claiming 58-percent of those surveyed would “recommend BlackBerry 10 as a development platform.” While it’s nice to have those numbers as backup for its bravado, the company still has a ways to go turning the tide of consumer perception and elbowing past that other third place platform. Windows Phone 8, we’re looking at you.

Continue reading RIM releases ‘gold’ build of its BB 10 SDK toolkit

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Jolla expects Sailfish SDK to reach developers in early Q1 2013

Jolla Sailfish OS demo

Developers looking to carry on part of the MeeGo legacy have been wondering when Jolla would publish a usable SDK for Sailfish OS. It hasn’t taken long to find out: the company has updated its wiki to tell us that the programming kit arrives early into the first quarter of 2013. Although that’s not immediate satisfaction, it’s close enough that development will start relatively soon after we receive hardware details. After that, it’s just a question of whether or not the mobile app community is willing to dive in.

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Via: Tonis Tech Blog

Source: SailfishOS.org

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Beautiful Widgets Hits v5, Gets All New Interface, Lockscreen Widget Support, Daydream Support, And More

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Oh Beautiful Widgets, how I love thee. This was one of the very first Android apps that I purchased when I got my OG Droid, and I’ve been using it ever since. Not just because it’s an amazingly-good app, but because LevelUp Studio constantly works to make it better and keep it relevant. And today the app reached v5.

Version 5 brings a whole slew of new stuff, including support for Android 4.2′s lockscreen widgets and Daydream feature, a completely overhauled (and far more intuitive) UI, Jelly Bean notifications, and may customizable details.

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Beautiful Widgets is easily one of the best widget apps in the Store, and definitely worth the $2.50 asking price.

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Beautiful Widgets Hits v5, Gets All New Interface, Lockscreen Widget Support, Daydream Support, And More was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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PhoneJoy Play Is Another Smartphone Gamepad That Does Absolutely Nothing To Solve The Problems Of Smartphone Gamepads

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Hey, have you heard? Gamepads for smartphones and tablets are a thing. A thing that is quickly becoming the Android equivalent of the many ridiculous iPhone plug-in accessories you’ll find all across the web.

So, we’re covering another one. It’s called PhoneJoy Play. It does this:

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You can fit a phone up to the size of a One X in the PhoneJoy Play horizontally, presumably. It connects (hold your applause, please) via Bluetooth, it requires games to implement compatibility (likely through an SDK to get full, native functionality), and you can fold it up into a more compact shape for play on televisions or tablets.

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PhoneJoy Play Is Another Smartphone Gamepad That Does Absolutely Nothing To Solve The Problems Of Smartphone Gamepads was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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PhoneJoy Play transforms smartphone to handheld gaming console, fund it now

We’ve seen quite a few controller peripherals for Android devices, but we haven’t quite seen anything like the PhoneJoy Play. The latest accessory from PhoneJoy takes everything great about their previous wireless gamepad for Android and combines it with a simple, intuitive mounting system to create a handheld console experience using any smartphone.

The PhoneJoy Play appears like a portable gamepad at first glance, but once you pull apart its two halves to reveal the proprietary easy slider mechanism it becomes much more. The Play can accept any smartphone in portrait or landscape mode, including big boys like the Galaxy Note 2. Once docked your handset takes on a second life as a powerful gaming machine.

What about the games? The PhoneJoy crew is providing an SDK for developers to directly integrate Play controls into their upcoming and available titles. For everything else, an app included with the Play allows for quick and easy configuration of controls. It seems like they thought of everything.

The PhoneJoy pay looks to be one of the most intuitive and unique gamepad experience we have ever seen for Android, and you can be a part of making it a reality. Kickstarter funding just went live, giving all the option to pick up the Play for as little as $50. Provided enough people contribute, the controller ships in April.

 

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Sony Finishes SDK With A Final Add-On

Sony just launched their Tablet SDK (Software Development Kit) add-on, which has completed the entirety of their SDK. With this pack, developers will now be able to manipulate some of the special features that are found in Sony tablets. These “special features” include windowed small apps that are found on the Xperia Tablet S. This does include the IR blaster (which is on the Xperia Tablet S as well), which can be used to interface with TVs. Devs that are looking for find documentation and code samples can head on over to the Sony Developer World website.

As you know, Sony has not been seeing any sort of massive success from their Android tablets, but one thing to keep in mind is how developer-friendly Sony has been. There is no doubt that when a company supports developers like this that there will eventually be some sort of interest and success. Although, that may just happen later on down the road as Sony continues to refine and improve the experience with their Xperia devices in general. Although from what I have seen, there has already been a pretty strong developer community surrounding the Xperia Tablet S over on the XDA Developers forums.

If you’re a developer or just someone interested in the tablet SDK, you can head on over to the source link below where you will be able to find a wealth of information.

Are you excited to see Sony completing the tablet SDK? Are you going to take advantage of it?

Sound off in the comments below!

source: Sony Developer World
via: Android Central 

 

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OUYA developer consoles begin shipping December 28th

It appears as though the highly anticipated and long-awaited OUYA consoles have officially been given a firm ship date of December 28th today, in addition to the news that the console’s SDK, dubbed “ODK”, would be available later that very same day. This announcement means Kickstarter backers can expect to receive the device “within a couple days” of the 28th, effectively kicking off their new year with a bang.

Production units are still expected to ship some time in March of next year, though the company has yet to announce an official release date. On the software side of things, users can expect to set up their units, including account activations by Christmas day. For the full run-down, be sure to hit the source link below.

Source: OUYA


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OUYA dev consoles arrive on December 28

It’s been a while since we heard from our old friends at OUYA. Ever since the Kickstarter campaign for the Android gaming console came to an end, things have been pretty silent on the OUYA front. That all changed today, with the OUYA team delivering a major announcement: OUYA dev consoles will be shipping out on December 28, which just so happens to be one month from now.


Hearing that, it seems development on the console has been progressing swimmingly, as it means that dev consoles are shipping out on time. The team also shared an image of an OUYA prototype, which you can see above. The prototype looks almost exactly like the renders we saw during the campaign, so that makes it even better.

December 28 is also the day that the OUYA SDK becomes available for everyone else, but you won’t be doing too much with it until your console is delivered. If you didn’t order a dev console, you’ll have to wait until March 2013 to get yours, which is when the rest of the OUYAs ship out to backers. We originally wondered if the OUYA team would be able to meet that March 2013 deadline, but with dev consoles shipping on time, it looks like OUYA is indeed on track to launch when originally intended.

While we imagine the dev consoles and the consoles that ship in March will be mostly the same, the OUYA team does say there’s a “special surprise,” waiting inside these early dev units. That’s all we’ve got as far as details go, so it looks like you’ll have to wait until your console arrives to see what it is. Did you order a dev console, or did you opt for the less expensive model that will ship in March?


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Sony releases tablet SDK add-on

Android Central

Sony has completed its SDK (software development kit) collection with the launch of today's Sony Tablet SDK add-on. The pack allows developers to "make use of the special features included in Sony tablets," the company says. These include the windowed "small apps" found on the Xperia Tablet S, as well as the IR blaster found on the same device, which can be used to interface with TVs.

Code samples and documentation can be found over at the Sony Developer World site.

Sony has yet to see massive success with its Android tablet line-up. But the inclusion of unique features like water resistance and a wedge-shaped design, as well as developer-friendly endeavors like this, could help the company stand out from the crowd.

Interested parties can find more info at the source link.

Source: Sony Mobile Developer World

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Heyzap launches social leaderboards

The folks at HeyZap have announced a new feature for its suite of tools for mobile game developers. Developers will now be able to easily implement social leaderboards to help players track their two-thumbed fortitude in a variety of different games. This social driven leaderboard will focus on the player’s friends more than anything else.

Not only will you get to see each others’ high scores and accomplishments in supported titles, but the new SDK will allow developers to implement a feature where a player’s friends are automatically notified of a new high score that they can try and beat.

The timing of these leaderboards couldn’t be more perfect as Openfeint announced its graceful exit out of the social gaming market. Heyzap is looking to carry the torch going into 2013, and it urges developers to give its easy-to-use SDK a try.

Over 50 games have been outfitted with this new functionality, including Trivia Burst, Speedy Biker Xtreme and more. The company’s attractive track record has allowed them to strike up partnerships with big names like Zynga, Bigfish, Com2Us and more.

If coding your own leaderboards and social gaming features isn’t your cup of tea then that is not a bad list of clientele to be included with. Users can check out the full Heyzap app in the Google Play Store here to discover Heyzap-enabled games and interact with friends. As for developers, you can get started with the latest version of the SDK by following this link.


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Jolla’s Sailfish OS promises multitasking, personalization and ‘effortless interaction’ (updated)

Jolla's Sailfish OS promises multitasking, personalization and 'effortless interaction' (updated)

The date we were promised an introduction to Sailfish is here, and it turns out Jolla’s not just targeting smartphones with its MeeGo-based OS, but tablets, smart TVs and other devices, too. Jolla has kept its OS under wraps until now, but it wants Sailfish to be an open-source affair which “will be built through community involvement and participation.” The SDK will be available soon, and we should get a look at the UI during a presentation occurring shortly. We’re assured superb multitasking capabilities, as well as deep personalization and “fast and effortless interaction.” Jolla has said Sailfish will be available for use with “multiple chipset technologies,” and is already supported on ST-Ericsson’s NovaThor platforms. It’s also reported that it’s partnering with Finnish carrier DNA to promote and sell Sailfish smartphones on home turf. The full reveal is coming shortly, so we’ll let you know more as soon as we do.

Update: The Jolla team took to the stage with touchscreen hardware in hand (we also spotted a Raspberry Pi), keen to express how they’ve been working all hours to boot Sailfish on anything they can find. The company called its creation the first truly “open ecosystem,” and said that development will be fully transparent from the outset. While there will be Jolla-branded phones launching, Sailfish is also being offered to handset manufacturers to use on their own hardware. The UI tour wasn’t as in depth as we’d have liked, but “true multitasking” was the main focus. Active programs can be pinned to the homescreen as tiles (in a layout that looks something like BlackBerry 10), which offer some control of the app without it hogging the screen. They also showed off a feature called “Ambiance,” which uses colors from a picture you select to tint the UI. We wish we had more info to share, but right now, we’re all just left wanting more.

Continue reading Jolla’s Sailfish OS promises multitasking, personalization and ‘effortless interaction’ (updated)

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Source: DNA

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Sony launches PlayStation Mobile Developer Program

 

It’s taken a few months, but Sony has finally taken the wraps off of their PlayStation Mobile Developer Program. This program allows developers to produce games on PlayStation-certified Android devices – such as HTC’s One X+ – as well as Sony’s PS Vita. It runs 7,980 Japanese yen for an annual license, or about $99. This annual license lets developers produce as many games as they would like, so that yearly fee doesn’t stack. Not a bad deal, if you ask me.

Today’s launch covers Japan, United States, Canada, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Australia, and Taiwan and Hong Kong are to follow suit in the near future. The SDK is available for download below, after processing that annual entry fee. Hit the break for the press release.

 

PlayStation Mobile Developer Registration

 

SONY COMPUTER ENTERTAINMENT INITIATES THE PLAYSTATION®MOBILE DEVELOPER PROGRAM
Official Version of PlayStation®Mobile SDK Now Publicly Available

Program Allows a Wider range of Developers to Create Dedicated Content for PlayStation™Certified Devices and PlayStation®Vita

Tokyo, November 20, 2012–Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. (SCE) today announced that it initiates the PlayStation®Mobile Developer Program which includes the official version of PlayStation®Mobile SDK*1 from today, in an effort to further expand the world of PlayStation® on open operating system-based devices*2 through PlayStation®Mobile.

Allowing a wider range of developers to create dedicated content for PlayStation Mobile, the PlayStation®Mobile Developer Program becomes available in Japan, United States, Canada, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Australia. The forthcoming phased roll out will start from Hong Kong and Taiwan and with more countries and regions to follow. This program enables developers to distribute easily their content through PlayStation®Store*3 on a commercial basis and market their games to millions of dedicated gamers with PlayStation™Certified*4 devices and PlayStation®Vita. The license agreement fee is 7,980 yen annually*5.

After receiving the feedback from developers who have used the open beta version since this April, the official version of PlayStation®Mobile SDK enhances its system stability. Along with the technical support from SCE through the developers forum where developers can exchange useful information, developers are also be able to seamlessly continue to develop content which was created with the open beta version.
(Please refer to the special site link for more detailed information)
https://psm.playstation.net/portal/

SCE will further accelerate the expansion of PlayStation™Certified devices and continue to collaborate with content developers to drive the delivery of compelling entertainment experiences through PlayStation®Mobile.
*1 A set of development tools and software libraries for PlayStation®Mobile.
*2 As of November 20, Android based PS Certified devices and PS Vita.
*3 Users can download vast digital content including games through PlayStation Store for PS3, PSP, PS Vita and PS Certified devices.
*4 The license program to expand PlayStation®Mobile, dedicated for portable hardware manufacturers. SCE will not only license logos but also provide necessary development support. Please kindly refer to the URL for the line-up of PS Certified devices.

http://www.playstation.com/psm/certified.html

*5 The fee is for the Japanese market. The fee differs by countries and regions. After closing the license agreement, developers are able to use PlayStation®Mobile SDK and conduct verification on PS Certified devices and PS Vita to distribute their content on PS Store.


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Sony launches PlayStation Mobile Developer Program

Android Central

After a few months in beta, Sony's PlayStation Mobile Developer Program is today ready for prime-time. The program allows game developers to build titles for PlayStation-certified Android phones and tablets — such as the Xperia T and HTC One X+ — as well as the company's PS Vita device, for an annual fee of  7,980 Japanese yen (around $99).

Today's launch covers Japan, United States, Canada, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Australia, with Hong Kong and Taiwan to follow in the near future.

PlayStation Mobile Developer Program membership gives devs the rights to create and publish as many titles as they wish, meaning the yearly fee doesn't stack for multiple games.

The full, finalized PlayStation Mobile SDK is available to download from the link below, after payment of the annual entry fee. You'll find today's full press release after the break.

More: PlayStation Mobile Developer Registration

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Qeexo FingerSense screen able to distinguish knuckle, stylus, nail, and finger taps

Android Central

Qeexo, a small company borne out of Carnegie Mellon, has been introducing FingerSense, a technology that allows smartphones and tablets to tell the difference between touches with a fingertip, finger pad, nail, knuckle, stylus, or stylus eraser.

They've modified a Samsung Galaxy S3 with a special acoustic sensor, while their  custom software demonstrates wide variety of applications, including contextual menus accessed through knuckle-taps, artistic input, and gaming. Qeexo is quietly getting developers hooked up with their Android SDK, and as a part of their pitch to OEMs, Qeexo boasts FingerSense is low-latency, real-time, and has a small demand on power. 

Personally, I could see this kind of touch behavior becoming very natural, and adding a whole level of navigational depth to Android beyond the standard set of gestures we've become used to. The only problem is that it hinges on smartphone manufacturers being on board, and even then, it can take awhile for them to work it into a final, shipped product. At the same time, Qeexo has to win over developers to support the input with compelling experiences that push manufacturers to adopt FingerSense – a hard sell for busy developers. 

More information on FingerSense, including a finished paper on the project is available here, while developers can learn more about getting involved at Qeexo's site. Developers, any interest? What are the odds that an OEM will pick this up? Could you guys see yourselves using knuckle-taps on a regular basis?

Via: TechNewsDaily

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How to unlock and root the Nexus 4

Nexus 4 shipments are starting to arrive for the very lucky souls that were able to get an order in. If you plan on unlocking your bootloader (and subsequently rooting) you Nexus 4, we recommend doing it first thing since unlocking the bootloader will reset and erase everything on your device. If you’re ready to go, you’ve come to the right place, just hit the break to get started.

**These instructions are straight forward and easy, but things can go wrong so we don’t take any responsibility.

Requirements

  1. You must have the sdk installed and be able to access and use adb and fastboot.
  2. You must have USB debugging enabled on your Nexus 4. If this is the first time going into developer options on your Nexus 4, just go into “About Phone” from your settings and tap the build number seven times. You will now see all developer options from now on.

 

Unlocking the bootloader

**By unlocking the bootloader you will completely reset your device so make sure to back up anything you want to keep.

  1. Connect your Nexus 4 to your PC via the USB cable that came with it
  2. Launch Terminal / Command Prompt
  3. Navigate to the fastboot/adb folder which will be inside the location where the Android SDK is installed (On Windows, it should be in C:\program files (x86)\android\android-sdk\platform-tools)
  4. Enter the following command: fastboot devices (You should see your device ID. If you don’t, you don’t have the proper driver installed and you can’t move forward unless you get this resolved. See below for help. If you see the device ID move on to step 5)
  5. Enter the following command: fastboot oem unlock  (If you didn’t get a device ID from step 4 and you moved to this step by mistake, it will be stuck on “Waiting for Device.” If this is the case, just hit CONTROL-C to stop it and see the below driver information)
  6. It should say Start in the top right. Hit the power button to reboot.

**If you ever want to lock the bootloader you can simply enter fastboot oem lock instead for step 5.

 

Gain Root Access

  1. Turn on USB debugging again
  2. Download and place CWM recovery for the Nexus 4 in the fastboot folder (again this location should be C:\program files (x86)\android\android-sdk\platform-tools in Windows)
  3. Download and place SU_Busybox_Package.zip directly under /sdcard on your device
  4. Enter the following command: adb reboot bootloader
  5. Enter the following command: fastboot flash recovery-clockwork-6.0.1.8-mako.img
  6. Tap the volume down so it shows Recovery Mode in the top right, then hit the power button.
  7. At this point you can perform a backup from the “backup and restore” option in case anything goes wrong. If you need to restore this backup ever, just use the restore option.
  8. From the main menu, navigate to install zip from sdcard > choose zip from sdcard > SU_Busybox_Package.zip
  9. From main menu, select reboot system now
  10. After reboot you should see SuperSU in your apps drawer, open it and tap on continue to make sure your installation is successful. 

If you followed these instructions correctly, your Nexus 4 bootloader is now unlocked and you should have permanent root. Congratulations!!!

 

**Driver Issues


You might find that even though you can access your Nexus 4 via Windows, you might have a problem with the driver not installed correctly from terminal mode. You will know you have this problem because the device ID didn’t appear in Step 4 or for Step 5. it’s stuck on “Waiting for Device.” You can’t unlock the bootloader until you get this resolved. The following may help…

Make sure the Google USB drivers are installed from the SDK.

Go to your Control Panel then Device Manager. You should see Android Phone with a Yellow ! mark on it. Right click on it and choose update driver, choose browse my computer, then Let me pick from a list. Select Android ADB Interface. You should be good to go. Return to Step 5 under Unlocking the bootloader.

If you’re having any other issues, make a comment below or head to this XDA thread.


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Google amends Android SDK to Tackle Fragmentation Issues

Fragmentation is perhaps the most precarious and repugnant problems Android platform faces. The issue not only frustrates the developers, but the users are also pretty irked by the multiple flavours of Android.

In an attempt to stop the fraudulent fragmentation issues, Google has modified its legal agreement with developers, which now includes an anti-fragmentation clause. The developers who wish to put their apps on Play Store have to compulsorily agree to the modified terms and conditions.

This is what Section 3.4 of Google’s new terms for developers reads:

“You agree that you will not take any actions that may cause or result in the fragmentation of Android, including but not limited to distributing, participating in the creation of, or promoting in any way a software development kit derived from the SDK.”

This is the first time Google has modified it’s terms since 2009. Previously, there was no written clause which asserted anything about anti-fragmentation.

Though the move is not sufficient, it certainly kicks off Google’s anti-fragmentation campaign. Google already knows how fragmentation creates mayhem, for both- users and developers. Due to fragmentation, developers are not able to create universal, bug-free apps. Also, it becomes more costly to develop and test apps, as multiple versions of Android require different coding standards. Moreover, the app needs to be tested on a number of devices, which adds to the testing expenses.

By giving out OTA updates, handset makers and wireless carriers can work together to assure that everyone is running a uniform version of Android. Of course, it’s impossible to port the latest versions of Android to older devices due to hardware constraints, but attempts can be made to reach to a uniform platform. According to Google’s statistics, more than 54% of Android devices run Android 2.3, which was released almost 2 years ago.

Though Google has released lots of scoops of different flavours till now, but to make things sweeter and better, it’s better now to make it a Sundae. And this is perhaps the first step towards that!

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