Posts Tagged software

Qualcomm updates Toq software with new release

Qualcomm has updated the software for their Toq smartwatch today — both the Android app and the watch firmware — and have brought along a few noteworthy improvements.

    



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Xiaomi launches MIUI software designed for tablets, works on Nexus 7

MIUI-for-tablets

Xiaomi has released its MIUI Android ROM which supports tablet devices. The ROM is available as an open beta for the 2013 edition Nexus 7.

The company said that this isn’t just based on the MIUI V5 software but is a completely revamped software with native apps, system menus and new screen animations suited for both screen orientations.

Xiaomi’s CEO, Lei Jun, also informed that tablet manufacturers can contact the company if they want to ship their tablets with MIUI pre-installed.

If you own a Nexus 7 tablet and would like to get your hand on the MIUI software, head to MIUI’s page to get the 278 MB download.

Source: MIUI
Via: Engadget

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ZTE Grand Memo II LTE hands-on

ZTE Grand Memo II LTE

Early software and questionable build quality have us wondering what the future holds for this huge phone

Mobile World Congress

ZTE has taken the wraps off of the second generation of its large device, the Grand Memo II LTE, here at MWC in Barcelona and we’ve had an opportunity for some quick hands-on time at the show. This device is definitely large, even in this world where 5-inch screens seem normal, with a full 6-inch 720 x 1280 display. ZTE mitigates some of the size issues with very small bezels around all sides and a 7.2mm thick body, but in the end it’s still mildly unwieldy at best. While it feels pretty solid in the hand and isn’t overly angular even with the lack of thickness, the build quality was really lacking on all of the units we had a chance to touch.

As a quick refresher, for specs we’re looking at a Snapdragon 400 processor (although the confusion of whether or not it will eventually have an S800 still stands), paired up with 2GB of RAM, 3200mAh battery and a pair of cameras at 13MP and 5MP. The display looks pretty good to our eyes — it’s an IPS panel — at the distance you usually hold large devices, although we do find the colors and brightness to be a bit lacking, at least in the trade show lighting scenario.

The software on the Grand Memo II LTE seems to follow pretty much in lock step with the previous version, even with the press conference indicating that the MiFavor 2.3 UI was a solid departure from the past. The devices on show here at MWC weren’t using the Play Store or Google services, though, so we’re thinking the software is still early. For what it’s worth, the software shown off in demos and press materials looks far better to our eyes — we’re withholding judgment until it’s all final.

Be sure to hang on past the break and see a quick video walkthrough and more pictures of the ZTE Grand Memo II LTE.

    



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Here’s another glimpse of what Project Tango can do

Project Tango

Google has unveiled Project Tango, a 3D sensing smartphone, which can make computer vision and perceptual computing solutions like software that maps and creates 3D reconstructions of indoor spaces.

Matterport, the company behind Project Tango’s software (and now working with Google), will be present at Mobile World Congress next week, so we’ll be hearing a lot from them in the next few days.

The software is brilliant, and as you’ll see in the video, pretty accurate as well as it maps an actual room using a Project Tango prototype. There is certainly some room (no pun intended) to grow for this project, but it’s an enormous start. The possibilities are nearly limitless for this type of software, so it’ll be exciting to see how Google and Matterport move ahead here.

Hit the break for the video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Source: TechCrunch

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Firefighter develops response and rescue software for Google Glass

google_glass_firefighterThere are so many possibilities for what can be done with Google Glass. One of the greatest so far may be firefighter Patrick Jackson’s software, which can push emergency calls to Glass and direct responders to its location and nearby hydrants with Google Maps. Jackson is also working on the ability to pull up floor plans and other relevant information about buildings before entry, in addition to vehicle diagrams and instructions for aiding in-car rescues.

You can check out the video after the break.

Source: +Google Glass

Click here to view the embedded video.

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The Nexus 5 speaker: Yes, there’s only one — and software may be hurting what you hear

Nexus 5 speaker

Audio output sounds great in some apps — and lousy in others​, especially whit spoken-word playback

Two things you need to know about the the speakers on the Nexus 5: First, there's only one speaker. Never mind that you see a pair of speaker grilles — there's only one speaker hidden back there. As we first learned on the LG G2 — a close cousin, insofar as the hardware goes — there's a speaker, and there's a microphone. Not two speakers. That's been confirmed by iFixit's teardown, as well, not that it was a surprise. Stick your finger over one of the speakers and it's readily apparent.

There other thing we've discovered is that the Nexus 5 speaker can be pretty decent, or it can be downright horrible — and it appears that software may be to blame here.

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Samsung Galaxy S4 vs LG G2 – Specs Comparison

With over two weeks having passed since LG G2’s formal introduction in New York City, you’re probably wondering why we’ve waited so long to pit this outstanding looking fellow against the current heavyweight champion of the Android world, Samsung’s Galaxy S4.

The answer is pretty simple. We wanted to let G2’s exceptional hardware, silky smooth software and innovative design sink in a bit and we also wanted to see how LG will be handling the commercial release of the 5.2-incher.

LG G2 vs Samsung Galaxy S4

As you probably know, LG hasn’t really been a favorite of the four major US carriers over time. The Optimus G and G Pro, for instance, though looking phenomenal on paper, have seen their chances of becoming American blockbusters crushed by Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile’s reluctance to pick them up or offer them in due time following their releases.

Not sure what’s changed in the past few months, but LG seems finally capable of turning the page in its relations with “The Big Four”, as all four networks are nearly confirmed to launch the G2 by the end of September.

verizon-lg-g2

That said, an LG flagship is likely to be judged for the first time… ever solely based on its hardware, software and design, so let’s see how all this holds up against Galaxy S4’s specs and features.

Design and build quality

The LG G2 may not be made of aluminum, which seems to be the hottest build material for smartphones nowadays, but it’s still sturdy, robust and elegant enough to beat the somewhat lackluster GS4 to the punch.

LG-G2-vs-Samsung-Galaxy-S4

Despite sporting extra screen real estate compared with its opponent (which is always a good thing), the G2 is not noticeably taller or wider than Samsung’s flagship. It’s also just a mm thicker and 13 grams heavier, things that you’re likely to look away from when hearing about the extra battery “juice” they bring to the table.

All in all, even if you don’t dig LG’s bold and controversial choice of placing physical buttons on G2’s back, you can’t deny the 5.2-incher is a design jewel and overall a more “premium” looking device than the overly plasticky S4.

Winner: LG G2

Display

Since the G2 reviews are not in yet and the phone is not available anywhere in the world, we’ll have to rely on cold numbers for otherwise subjective battles like this one. And the cold numbers say two things.

lg-g2-vs-galaxy-s4-display

On one hand, the G2 has a larger display than the S4 (5.2 vs. 5 inches), while on the other the pixel density is slightly lower (424 vs. 441 ppi). All things considered, I highly doubt anyone will notice any lack of crispness, brightness or complain of poor viewing angles out of G2’s stupendous Full HD panel, so the verdict here is quite predictable.

Winner: It’s a tie

Processing speed and cameras

I know, it’s not really fair to criticize a four month-old handheld for not being able to keep up with a yet to be released device in raw speed, but the tech world is seldom fair. So I’m sorry, Samsung, but the LG G2 is the clear winner here.

snapdragon-800

The 5.2-incher comes with an explosive quad-core Snapdragon 800 processor clocked at 2.2 GHz, far superior to the 600 or even the Exynos 5 Octa inside the S4. Sure, Samsung’s pack leader comes in a Snapdragon 800 flavor itself, but as of now that’s only available in Korea.

LG-G2-camera

Meanwhile, the dual cameras of the two phones look nearly identical on paper (sporting 13 and 2 MP sensors), though we’ll have to wait and see G2’s real-life performance in this department.

Winner: G2

Software

This is another battle that I’m reluctant to declare a final winner in, as we’re yet to see LG G2’s software perform in real-life conditions. Both phones come with pre-loaded Android 4.2 Jelly Bean and they both have skins on top (TouchWiz and Optimus UI), but we know very well some differences are to be noticed.

lg-g2-samsung-galaxy-s4

Theoretically speaking, G2’s user interface should look purer and closer to vanilla Android, but on the other hand the Samsung device comes with plenty of exciting exclusive apps and tweaks (i.e. gimmicks), including Smart Stay, Smart Pause and S Health.

Winner: Tie again

Battery life

With the risk of becoming annoying, I think I’ll hold off on a final verdict here as well for after we see the G2 in action. Again theoretically speaking, LG’s beast should have the upper hand, as it packs a massive 3,000 mAh battery (the S4 only comes with a 2,600 mAh ticker in tow).

lg-g2-vs-galaxy-s4-battery

But what you have to remember is the G2 sports the larger screen and is powered by the faster and more power-hungry CPU. Plus, LG’s software optimizations (or lack thereof) have been known to cause autonomy shortages in the past.

Winner: Yet another tie

Others

Based on speculations and leaks preceding the G2 intro, we had hoped the 5.2-incher would come with a premium design, massive, user removable battery and microSD support. Sadly, that’s not the case after all (unless you live in Korea), so the GS4 wins massive points for being the only one of these two to allow both the replacing of its battery and storage expansion.

Samsung-Galaxy-S4-Micro-SD

Then again, at least the G2 features 32 GB of on-board memory, which should be enough to go around even for the most passionate movie and music buffs. Finally, as far as pricing goes, there should be no difference between the two both with and without contractual obligations ($200 and $600 tags).

Winner: GS4

Conclusion

I’ll keep this short. The LG G2 is the most dangerous contender for S4′s crown. On paper. Whether it will be so in reality remains to be seen. Worst case scenario, G2′s battery and cams will prove glitchy, which will still leave the 5.2-incher with the raw performance edge. Uh-oh, it sounds to me like old Sam is in trouble.

Thankfully for them, the GNote 3 is coming soon and could get them out of this pickle.  

The post Samsung Galaxy S4 vs LG G2 – Specs Comparison appeared first on The Droid Guy.

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Editorial: The only secure option is the one that lets us read the code

Android license

Unless you can see what it's doing, you have to trust that the software running on your mobile device is for your eyes only

We're going to spend a bit of time talking security on Talk Mobile 2013 this week. A lot of the discussion is going to be about what you share online, with or without your knowledge, and ways we can keep our mobile devices secured when they leave our hands. It's all very important stuff, but there is one other thing I want to bring up, and that's what I like to call the transparency factor.

To put it simply, the only time you can trust any software is when you can read the code and see what it is doing. Maybe you (and often times, me as well) don't understand all of it, but rest assured someone out there does. And they are looking. Putting code online for peer review is the only way independent third parties can see what it is really doing. And that can be pretty damn important.

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Gigahertz, megapixels, and millimeters – do specs matter at all? – Talk Mobile

There are three major elements to the smartphone experience. The hardware, the software, and the services. Software comprises the virtual; it is the operating system and the apps. Services is a bit broader, but it includes cloud connections like backup and app stores as well as the cellular connection provided by the carrier.

Hardware is a different beast. Software and services are ephemeral. You cannot pick up and hold a strong LTE signal. It’s energy, it’s bits and bytes. Hardware is the physical. It’s the device itself. It’s the case, the display, the touchscreen, the buttons, the speakers, the microphones, the radios, the processor, the memory, the storage, the sensors, the cameras, the ports, the battery, and everything else that goes into physically building the device.

Hardware is what enables the software and services. Without the hardware, the software couldn’t happen. Conversely, without the software and services, the hardware would merely be a fancy paperweight. So just how important is hardware? Do the specs matter, or is it what you can do with the specs that’s important? Should we compromise quality for price? And when is it time to put old tech out to pasture?

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Chinese Dual-SIM HTC One gets Android 4.2.2 Update, Others to Follow?

HTC-ProductDetail-Hero-slide-04

 

Some big news out there for Chinese users of the HTC One. It’s getting an update from the current 4.1.2 software to the 4.2.2 software. In terms of advancements, that’s a lot. Some advancements include:

  • Android 4.2.2
  • Lock Screen Widgets [Most Likely]
  • Enhanced Home Button Behavior
  • The ability to change options for the home button to get rid of the notification bar [the black bar with that one button]
  • A quick settings panel

HTC-One-dual-SIM-Android-422-update

And those are just a few. There’s probably lots more out there.

Now the question is: When will the international (European) and US versions get 4.2.2? The latest rumor (from @LlabTooFeR) is that the international versions could get it soon. Hopefully sometime in the next few weeks.

Another rumor is that the Red HTC One (which is at the moment, exclusive to the UK) could arrive out of the box with 4.2.2. The US versions (depending on the carriers) would probably follow a few short weeks after 4.2.2 is out for international Ones.

Naturally this is all interesting, but we’ll have to wait and see. Hopefully someone converts this software into a ROM for the rest of us. Enjoy the update, for those of you that have a Chinese Dual-SIM HTC One.

Sources: Unwired View, @LlabTooFeR

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International HTC One Receiving Update to Improve Camera Suite of Software

According to HTC, an update is rolling out starting today for the International version of the HTC One (review here), aiming to fix up some of the software found on the device. Most of the fixes are for the camera, such as improvements for Zoes, noise reduction in slow motion capture, improved color reduction, and [...]
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International HTC One Receiving Update to Improve Camera Suite of Software

According to HTC, an update is rolling out starting today for the International version of the HTC One (review here), aiming to fix up some of the software found on the device. Most of the fixes are for the camera, such as improvements for Zoes, noise reduction in slow motion capture, improved color reduction, and [...]
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HTML 5 bugs allows data dumps

HTML 5 Logo

With increasing problems of hacking showing up everywhere on the internet, it is a good move to protect yourself. When it comes to protecting one’s computer, the first thing that comes to mind is a good anti virus software. It is always good to buy a software which is capable of monitoring your ports and internet activity so that you could be aware of the activities that are going on on your computer. It is also wise to monitor the various processes that are running on your computer. But usually we do not have so much of time. We do not even know, sometimes, how much storage space is left on our hard drives.

And at such times, it becomes difficult to tell if a third party has stored some data on our computers without our knowledge. How is that possible, you ask? Well, a newly discovered bug in HTML 5 lets a cleverly coded web site store gigabytes of data on our computers, as uncovered by the developer, Feross Aboukhadijeh. This vulnerability of HTML 5 is present in almost all major web browsers, including Apple’s Safari, Google’s Chrome, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, Opera, and others. But the only web browser which did not showcase this behavior is said to be Mozilla’s Firefox, which caps the data at 5 MB.

So basically the problem is that the bug lets website dump any amount of data on your hard drive, which is never a good thing. Even though the default limit given to a web site to store data on the local computer in 2.5 MB, the bug lets the web site create multiple web pages linked to it and these multiple web sites are given 2.5 MB each.

As Aboukhadijeh demonstrates with his test website Filldisk, he is able to dump 1 GB of data every 16 seconds. He tested this on his MacBook Pro with Retina display and SSD hard disk. He says that 32 bit browsers such as Chrome may even crash before the disk is full. I think this has to be fixed. More info at the source.

Source: Apple Insider

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OTA available for Sprint HTC EVO Design 4G

Sprint is putting out a small update for those out there who picked up a HTC EVO Design 4G device. The update brings our software up to version 4.02.651.2. It only offers up 3 minor little fixes and nothing major like an OS update or anything. It never hurts to stay up to date with what ever the carrier and manufacturer decides to give you.

HTC EVO Design 4G Sprint OTAAs always, the update could take a few days to appear on your device. You can attempt to initiate the update now, or wait till the 26th when it is supposed to be sent to everyone. Have a charge of more than 50% to get it rolling. With the list being so small, we don’t think the download will be very large.

Via Sprint 

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BlackBerry granted gesture recognition patent for touch-free image manipulation

BlackBerry granted gesture recognition patent for touchfree image manipulation

If BlackBerry lives to see 2014 (and beyond), it could end up delighting smartphone users with some neat gesture recognition tech. In a recently surfaced patent filing, the company formerly known as RIM outlines a method for selecting onscreen images using hand or finger movements above a display. By synthesizing a combo of images — one taken with IR, the other without — the software would be able to determine the intended area of selection. And just in case there was any doubt this feature would be headed to smartphones and tablets, the docs go on to specify its use within “a mobile communications device, comprising: a digital camera… [and] a cellular subsystem.” So there you have it — you’ll either potentially see this hands-off editing tool pop up in future BB devices or BB simply stands to make a some nice coin in licensing fees.

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Source: USPTO

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HTC One imaging in depth: UltraPixel camera and Zoe Share

HTC One imaging in depth UltraPixel camera and Zoe Share

Saying that the HTC One has piqued our interest is an understatement. The handset, which was announced today in London and New York, combines ultra-refined design with a uniquely tweaked Android experience, something we’ve covered in our hardware and software posts. Still, it’s the UltraPixel camera that’s raising the most eyebrows. We briefly played with the shooter and witnessed the new Zoe functionality first hand. It’s clear that HTC is making a bold move with the imaging technology used on this phone, but what does it really mean in terms of specs and performance? Let’s dive into the nitty gritty after the break.

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Video: Hands-on With HTC Zoe

The HTC One has a ton of new features to go over, but the camera and its software will be one of the highlights that many are going to be looking at. In this video, Kellex gives us a brief overview of the “UltraPixel” shooter and the new feature, HTC Zoe. Zoe allows for your [...]

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Sprint’s Samsung Galaxy S3 receiving minor update

A new update is available for the Samsung Galaxy S3 on Sprint. The software upgrade, which brings to phone to build version L710VPBMA6, is nothing earth-shattering. The full changelog “misc bug fixes,” “voicemail application update,” and “SMS 3-digit support.”

The update is queued to start reaching handsets today. It should push over the air. As with all OTA updates expect the rollout to last days or even weeks, so if you don’t see it up front or after checking via the “About phone” menu under settings, be patient.

[via Sprint | Thanks, Andy!]

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HTC Forces Owner Of HTCRUU.com To Shut Down, Hand Over The ROMs (And Domain)

wm_IMG_5157

It seems the days of centrally accessible HTC RUU files are at an end – for the time being – as the owner of HTCRUU.com was forced to surrender his site after a representative HTC’s legal team suggested this was the only way to “resolve” his unauthorized hosting of HTC’s software. No formal legal action was taken against the owner.

HTCRUU was quite simply a repository of Sense ROMs for HTC phones. HTC decided it didn’t like that sort of thing, and told James his site infringed HTC’s trademark and copyrights.

Which it did. It used HTC’s logo, HTC’s name in the URL, and it hosted proprietary HTC software, all without permission.

Done With This Post? You Might Also Like These:

HTC Forces Owner Of HTCRUU.com To Shut Down, Hand Over The ROMs (And Domain) was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 receiving Android 4.1.2

Samsung’s Galaxy Note 10.1 is getting a software refresh in the US. Yes, the wait is over as users are reporting the arrival of Android 4.1.2 Jelly Bean for the stylus-ready slate. The update enables such lusted after features as multi-view for running apps in windowed mode, air view functionality allowing stylus interactions when hovering above the screen (no touch required), and more.

The push is going out far and wide it would appear. XDA’s forums contain plenty reports of successful updates to the new Android OS. Any readers out there with a Note 10.1 receive the update yet? Let us know what you think.

[Thanks to all who sent this in! Image via XDA]

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Sprint issues quick software upgrade for LG Optimus G

The LG Optimus G on Sprint will is getting a software upgrade, folks! Well, it won’t be the most exciting patch you’ll have ever applied but we can’t be mad at continuous support. The upgrade does change a couple of things, such as an upgraded visual voicemail experience and improvements to the phone’s battery life.

Bug fixes are aplenty, too. The list of fixes include the intermittent freezing issues, intermittent device resets during YouTube playback, removal of invalid info in Replay All email responses, the Mobile ID icon being changed to the Sprint ID icon, and a fix for the device’s power up issues after suffering an unsuccessful WiFi connection.

The upgrade will be going out in a staggered process, of course, but that’s par for the course by now. You won’t have to wait longer than a week and a half if your device doesn’t pull it down right away, though. If the notification hasn’t made its way to your device yet then you can try your hand at forcing it. Just head to the Settings > About Phone menu on your device to check for a software upgrade and you’ll be on your way.

[via Sprint]

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Refresh Roundup: week of December 31st, 2012

Your smartphone and / or tablet is just begging for an update. From time to time, these mobile devices are blessed with maintenance refreshes, bug fixes, custom ROMs and anything in between, and so many of them are floating around that it’s easy for a sizable chunk to get lost in the mix. To make sure they don’t escape without notice, we’ve gathered every possible update, hack, and other miscellaneous tomfoolery we could find during the last week and crammed them into one convenient roundup. If you find something available for your device, please give us a shout at tips at engadget dawt com and let us know. Enjoy!

Continue reading Refresh Roundup: week of December 31st, 2012

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Samsung Galaxy R Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich update now available for Indian owners

After 14 months since the release of Samsung Galaxy R in Indian market, owners can now update their device to Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich (ICS) as Samsung started the roll out a couple of days ago. All bug fixes, performance boosters and new features are packed into a 239MB package. It is, therefore, recommended for owners to have stable and fast internet connection as it may take several minutes to finish downloading the package.

galaxy r ics update india

Galaxy R was released in India in October 2011 running Android 2.3 Gingerbread, originally. In the same month, Google officially announced Ice Cream Sandwich. The anticipation for a more stable and better operating system started since then. Consequently, Galaxy R owners in the United States and other regions started receiving this very same update in August of 2012 but Indian owners were left hanging and wanting for it.

Samsung Galaxy R, otherwise known in other regions as Galaxy Z, was released packed with impressive specs at the time. It is powered by Nvidia Tegra 2 chipset with dual-core processor clocked at 1GHz plus a complementary 1GB RAM. Basically, it is a powerful device and even very much capable of running the latest Android 4.1/4.2 Jelly Bean firmware without problems. While the ICS update rollout is good news for majority of Galaxy R owners in India, it also means they have to wait several months for possible JB update.

It also shows that Samsung has always been unenthusiastic in releasing updates for devices outside “flagship” category. Or, at least, this is how owners of Galaxy R feel. Recently, though, the South Korean manufacturer assured Samsung community that majority of its devices will be updated to latest firmware. So, let’s see about that.

The Samsung Galaxy R Android 4.0 ICS update can be downloaded over-the-air or via Samsung KIES. For OTA update, owners are advised to head to Settings => About phone => Software updates to manually initiate update search.

Those who prefer to use KIES will have to download the client from Samsung’s website and install it to their computer. They need to connect their device to the computer where KIES is installed to pull down updates.

So far, there is no information if Samsung Galaxy R will receive a software bump to Jelly Bean. But as far as specs are concerned, the device is much able to run whatever version of Android you throw at it. So, we just hope it won’t take a year or so before Samsung would give us information about it.

Price Disclaimer
Prices are accurate as of less than 12 hours ago. Product prices and availability are subject to change. Any price and availablility information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of any products.

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Mad Catz reveals line of multiplatform gaming peripherals alongside GameSmart initiative

After introducing the world to its GameSmart crossplatform hardware initiative last week just ahead of CES 2013, Mad Catz today revealed exactly what that’ll mean for consumers: several of the company’s peripherals are being reappropriated for use across mobile, PC, and Mac platforms. That includes the R.A.T. mouse, the F.R.E.Q. headset, the M.O.U.S.9 wireless mouse, and the C.T.R.L.R. wireless gamepad, all of which are being branded into the GameSmart line. Beyond the PC / Mac / mobile applications of these devices, Mad Catz says “some” are also designed for console use without going into specifics — we’ll be sure to ask Mad Catz about that when we get our first hands-on with the line of GameSmart peripherals this evening. All four devices become available “in a range of distinctive colors” to the general public in “early 2013.”

Gallery: Mad Catz R.A.T.M

Continue reading Mad Catz reveals line of multiplatform gaming peripherals alongside GameSmart initiative

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Mobile Miscellany: week of December 31st, 2012

Mobile Miscellany week of December 31st, 2012

If you didn’t get enough mobile news during the week, not to worry, because we’ve opened the firehose for the truly hardcore. This week, two of the best cameraphones out there were pitted against one another in a shootout rematch and a very handy widget was added to the latest nightly builds of CyanogenMod. These stories and more await after the break. So buy the ticket and take the ride as we explore the “best of the rest” for this week of December 31st, 2012.

Continue reading Mobile Miscellany: week of December 31st, 2012

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HTC One X Receiving Jelly Bean Update On O2 UK

HTC One X

If you’re living in the United Kingdom and own one of HTC’s One X’s on O2′s network, you have a tasty treat awaiting you, as the device is now receiving the Jelly Bean update. This has been confirmed by HTC UK on their Twitter account. As usual, the update is being pushed out in batches, so if you don’t have it just yet, don’t worry, as it shouldn’t be too long of a wait! As is standard, to check if you’ve gotten the update head on over to Settings > About > Software Updates > Check Now. If you have access to it a notification will pop up.

Before downloading the update, you may want to connected to Wi-Fi network as the update is a massive 365MB in size. As you might have seen already, Android 4.1 Jelly Bean brings awesome features like Google Now and Project Butter to increase performance. Additionally, the update also brings the One X to the latest version of HTC’s Sense software, which is commonly known as Sense+.

Now One X users in the United Kingdom can finally relax for a moment now that they have Jelly Bean. Surely One X users in the UK will be in anticipation again tomorrow though, as there will no doubt be hopes of an update to Android 4.2 in the near future.

Are you one of the lucky users who were able to get the update? Let us know how you’re liking the sticky goodness of Jelly Bean in the comments section below!

source: HTC UK Twitter
via: Android Central

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comScore releases November 2012 market share for US smartphones

 

It’s always fun to look back at a previous year and see what kinds of smartphones were the most popular. comScore has released their data about popular smartphone platforms from a three-month period ending in November of 2012, studying about 30,000 phones. There’s plenty of interesting information, but it’s mostly what we’ve expected. Samsung and Apple continue to dominate smartphone sales, with LG, Motorola, and HTC rounding out the top 5. (Sony is apparently not faring as well in the States.) Both Samsung and Apple are still growing over this three-month period, with Samsung starting with 25.7% and ending with 26.9%, and Apple starting and ending with 17.1% and 18.5%. LG actually started off this period with 18.2% but slipped to 17.5%, giving Apple the number 2 spot. Motorola fell about 0.8% to 10.4% and HTC fell 0.4% to 5.9%, but neither moved up or down the charts. None of the percentages are drastic, but it just backs up what we already know and expect from the smartphone market.

Android still powers over half of the 123.3 million phones in the US, and grew from 52.6% to 53.7%, and Apple’s iOS claims about 30%. Neither Android or iOS fell in market share; their positive growth came from eating up what’s left of RIM, Microsoft, and Symbian software. It’s not good news for Microsoft’s new Windows 8, but I don’t think any of us were too worried about those tiles messing up our little green friend, were we?

There’s also a third chart that shows what people do with their phones, which surprised me a bit to learn that only 28% of people use their phone to listen to music. Hit the source below if you want to get into more of the nitty-gritty statistics.

source: comScore

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comScore releases November 2012 market share for US smartphones

 

It’s always fun to look back at a previous year and see what kinds of smartphones were the most popular. comScore has released their data about popular smartphone platforms from a three-month period ending in November of 2012, studying about 30,000 phones. There’s plenty of interesting information, but it’s mostly what we’ve expected. Samsung and Apple continue to dominate smartphone sales, with LG, Motorola, and HTC rounding out the top 5. (Sony is apparently not faring as well in the States.) Both Samsung and Apple are still growing over this three-month period, with Samsung starting with 25.7% and ending with 26.9%, and Apple starting and ending with 17.1% and 18.5%. LG actually started off this period with 18.2% but slipped to 17.5%, giving Apple the number 2 spot. Motorola fell about 0.8% to 10.4% and HTC fell 0.4% to 5.9%, but neither moved up or down the charts. None of the percentages are drastic, but it just backs up what we already know and expect from the smartphone market.

Android still powers over half of the 123.3 million phones in the US, and grew from 52.6% to 53.7%, and Apple’s iOS claims about 30%. Neither Android or iOS fell in market share; their positive growth came from eating up what’s left of RIM, Microsoft, and Symbian software. It’s not good news for Microsoft’s new Windows 8, but I don’t think any of us were too worried about those tiles messing up our little green friend, were we?

There’s also a third chart that shows what people do with their phones, which surprised me a bit to learn that only 28% of people use their phone to listen to music. Hit the source below if you want to get into more of the nitty-gritty statistics.

source: comScore

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Featured Android App Review: Floating YouTube Popup Video [Utilities]

If you’ve been secretly jealous of your friends showing off their Samsung Popup Player or their LG Q Slide or if you simply want to be able to multitask while watching YouTube videos, then you need to check out Floating YouTube Popup Video by Sud Software. It’s actually already better than the Q Slide since you can actually watch YouTube videos with it. Just install the app and pick your YouTube video of choice. Then hit the share link and tap the “Floating YouTube Video” icon and bingo, the video will appear on your homescreen as a popup. You are free to do anything you want while watching the video with full sound. You can browse web pages, read/respond to emails, play a game, or just about anything you want to do. You can even resize the video by dragging a corner. If part of the video is in your way of something you’re reading, no problem, just drag it somewhere else. It couldn’t be easier as you can see in my hands on video after the break

Click here to view the embedded video.

Floating YouTube Popup Video is absolutely Free so give it a shot by hitting one of the download links below. As always, let me know what you think.

FEATURES

  • Watch YouTube videos while using your device for other purposes
  • Full Featured Video Player with common Video Player Controls (Play, Pause, Stop, Rewind, etc).
  • Easy to use
  • Free
  • Seamlessly draggable YouTube popup video player to anywhere on the screen
  • Re-sizeable YouTube Video Player
  • Full audio and complete volume control from YouTube, even when the screen of your device is off

STEPS TO USE APPLICATION:

  1. Launch Android’s YouTube App
  2. Navigate to the Video you want to Play in YouTube
  3. While in the YouTube app, Select Menu, then Options and then Share
  4. Select Floating YouTube Popup Player
  5. Enjoy Watching the Movie in the fully interactive Video Player

 

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Floating_YouTube_Popup_Video_02
Floating_YouTube_Popup_Video_03
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Floating_YouTube_Popup_Video_05
Floating_YouTube_Popup_Video_Splash_Banner

QR Code generator

Play Store Download Link

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comScore releases November 2012 market share for US smartphones

 

It’s always fun to look back at a previous year and see what kinds of smartphones were the most popular. comScore has released their data about popular smartphone platforms from a three-month period ending in November of 2012, studying about 30,000 phones. There’s plenty of interesting information, but it’s mostly what we’ve expected. Samsung and Apple continue to dominate smartphone sales, with LG, Motorola, and HTC rounding out the top 5. (Sony is apparently not faring as well in the States.) Both Samsung and Apple are still growing over this three-month period, with Samsung starting with 25.7% and ending with 26.9%, and Apple starting and ending with 17.1% and 18.5%. LG actually started off this period with 18.2% but slipped to 17.5%, giving Apple the number 2 spot. Motorola fell about 0.8% to 10.4% and HTC fell 0.4% to 5.9%, but neither moved up or down the charts. None of the percentages are drastic, but it just backs up what we already know and expect from the smartphone market.

Android still powers over half of the 123.3 million phones in the US, and grew from 52.6% to 53.7%, and Apple’s iOS claims about 30%. Neither Android or iOS fell in market share; their positive growth came from eating up what’s left of RIM, Microsoft, and Symbian software. It’s not good news for Microsoft’s new Windows 8, but I don’t think any of us were too worried about those tiles messing up our little green friend, were we?

There’s also a third chart that shows what people do with their phones, which surprised me a bit to learn that only 28% of people use their phone to listen to music. Hit the source below if you want to get into more of the nitty-gritty statistics.

source: comScore

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