Posts Tagged takeaway

The “FACKWORS” Shirt.

Who would have thought that as I blasted the Google Play store for its poor handling of the 2nd Nexus 4 launch, that the number 1 takeaway from it would have been my failure to correctly type a CAPTCHA? Enter the word FACKWORS, which readers have been ribbing me over for weeks now. It’s a [...]

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Xbox: The new face of ‘entertainment’ at Microsoft, beyond just video games

The most striking takeaway from a recent meeting I had with Xbox Music GM Jerry Johnson wasn’t the Spotify-like service he was in New York City to show off, but rather what he said about a much larger internal change at Microsoft. Having been relegated to the world of video games for the past decade, Microsoft is opening up its Xbox branding to a larger world of media. “‘Xbox’ is actually going from thinking about gaming in a device to being the entertainment face for all of Microsoft,” Johnson said — a major change from the Xbox name’s place as a stand-in for “the Halo and Gears of War box,” trotted out once or twice annually by lower level execs from the Washington-based software giant. “That’s what the company — all the way up to Steve Ballmer — have gotten behind. That’s why you’re gonna see movies on Windows 8 slates, you’re gonna see music, and it’s gonna be branded as ‘Xbox.’,” he explained. This naming convention carries to Windows Phone 8 and Windows 8 RT as well — all post-Windows 7 Microsoft devices (and Xbox 360) will refer to music and video libraries as “Xbox Music” and “Xbox Video,” respectively.

But to many, that shift could be confusing. Isn’t “Xbox” that thing in the living room? When “Xbox Music” shows up on Windows 8 devices later this month, will your average user understand that, no, they don’t have to own an Xbox to listen to the music therein? Johnson’s not worried about that potential reality. “The brand has continued to evolve,” he argued. “I don’t think it’s left anything behind, I think it’s broadened the number of people who engage in these type of experiences. And Microsoft as a company I think recognizes that, and it’s more about Xbox meaning ‘entertainment.’”

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Xbox: The new face of ‘entertainment’ at Microsoft, beyond just video games originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 15 Oct 2012 13:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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FCC planning to release 300MHz of spectrum to carriers by 2015

Android Central

Speaking yesterday at the University of Pennsylvania, chairman of the FCC Julius Genachowski explained how he plans to release another 300MHz of wireless spectrum to high speed wireless carriers by 2015. A large portion of the spectrum will be auctioned off in the AWS (Advanced Wireless Services) band, which isn't exactly what you'd call "prime real estate", but is where AT&T currently operates some LTE and T-Mobile has historically ran its HSPA+ network. New chunks of AWS being available could give a much-needed boost to these networks.

We hear a lot about spectrum nowadays — who has it? who doesn't? why does it matter? — but the real takeaway here is that more spectrum being available for carriers to use is a good thing. It essentially means that carriers will have more room to allocate bandwidth to devices, especially in major metropolitan areas where its quite apparent that these networks are oversaturated

Source: FCC (pdf); via Slashdot

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Editorial: HTC’s departure from South Korea proves a tough fight for foreign brands

Editorial HTC's departure from South Korea proves a tough fight for foreign brands

HTC’s closure of its South Korean office may seem yet another blow to the company this year, but don’t be alarmed: we saw it coming. It’s a given that Peter Chou’s gang is cutting back in response to its recent weak performance, but the more interesting takeaway here is the fact that the South Korean smartphone market is one tough nut for foreign brands to crack open. Just walk into any carrier shop in Seoul and you’ll see the shelves dominated by devices from Samsung, LG and Pantech. If you’re lucky, you may spot the odd Sony, Motorola and HTC phones cowering in a corner. So why is that the case? Let’s take a look at the how it all started.

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Editorial: HTC’s departure from South Korea proves a tough fight for foreign brands originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 02 Aug 2012 15:40:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Ice Cream Sandwich adoption doubles from July to August

Android Platform Versions

Another month is upon us (again already?), and that means it's time for another breakdown of Android versions. This is the monthly look at the percentage of the various Android versions that are on active phones. Here's the gist:

  • Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean): 0.8 percent
  • Android 4.0.3 to 4.0.4 (Ice Cream Sandwich): 15.9 percent
  • Android 3.1-3.2 (Honeycomb): 2.3 percent
  • Android 2.3-2.3.7 (Gingerbread): 60.6 percent
  • Android 2.2 (Froyo): 15.5 percent
  • Android 2.1 (Eclair): 4.2 percent
  • Android 1.6 (Donut) 0.5 percent
  • Android 1.5 (Cupcake): 0.2 percent

Our big takeaway from this is that Ice Cream Sandwich has more than doubled, from 7.1 percent at this point last month. And that'll grow again for August, and presumably the rest of the year.

Jelly Bean makes its first appearance at less than 1 percent, and we're not expecting a huge bump until more retails devices (as in, anything not named Nexus) are released, though any increase may be a good indication of how the Nexus 7 tablet is selling.

Source: Android Developers

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[Update: Verizon Clarifies] Verizon Will End Unlimited Data Grandfathering If You Buy A 4G Phone From This Summer Onward

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Update: In response to the rather vocal outcries of many of its subscribers on the web, Verizon has clarified what will happen to 3G/4G data plans explicitly. The takeaway is this: anyone purchasing a smartphone from this summer forward on subsidy pricing will be pushed into tiered/shared data. If you choose not to buy a smartphone on subsidy, you can keep your unlimited plan if you choose to.

This means if you renew your 2-year agreement, from this summer forward, on any line by buying a “discounted” phone, you lose unlimited.

Here are the exact statements:

  • Customers will not be automatically moved to new shared data plans.

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[Update: Verizon Clarifies] Verizon Will End Unlimited Data Grandfathering If You Buy A 4G Phone From This Summer Onward was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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The Engadget interview: AT&T’s Glenn Lurie talks Digital Life at CTIA 2012 (video)

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We had the opportunity to sit down and chat with Glenn Lurie — president of emerging enterprises and partnerships — about AT&T’s Digital Life product which was recently announced and then launched today at CTIA 2012 here in New Orleans. Our takeaway? AT&T wants to tag everything in your home with an IP address and tie it all together seamlessly in a blaze of digital glory. Don’t believe us? Watch our video and judge for yourself.

Continue reading The Engadget interview: AT&T’s Glenn Lurie talks Digital Life at CTIA 2012 (video)

The Engadget interview: AT&T’s Glenn Lurie talks Digital Life at CTIA 2012 (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 07 May 2012 20:44:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Motorola RAZR MAXX priced in the UK

Love Motorola’s design sense, but can’t stand to have a phone that lasts less than three days on a single charge? Then the DROID RAZR MAXX is for you. Unless you’re one of the 6 billion or so people outside of Verizon’s US-only coverage area – then you’ll have to wait for the international GSM version, the RAZR MAXX. Moto confirmed that the phone would be coming to Europe and the Middle East on Tuesday, and now UK retailer Clove has posted the pre-order page. Prepare to pay up if you want the extra longevity.

The RAZR MAXX is listed at £359.00, almost forty pounds more than the regular RAZR. After UK taxes it’s £430, roughly equivalent to $680. That’s pretty close to what Verizon is selling the DROID RAZR MAXX for without a contract, but they’re selling the original DROID RAZR at the same price, when equipped with an identical 16GB SD card. The takeaway here is that you’re paying either for an incredibly slim device, or for one that’s more average but gets amazing battery life. Motorola seems to be taking a completely different track when it comes to the international version of the MAXX.

The RAZR MAXX will be available sometime in May, though neither Motorola nor Clove gave an exact date. Clove’s usually pretty exacting when it comes to initial releases, so you can expect to see similar prices elsewhere when compared to the original RAZR. Moto hasn’t stated so yet, but the RAZR MAXX should get access to an unlocked bootloader through MotoDev, unlike its Verizon-bound cousins.


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Nokia releases Q4 2011 earnings report: operating profits drop, Lumia sales break one million

Nokia released its latest quarterly earnings report today, following up on a somewhat disappointing Q3 with a similarly bleak Q4. The Finnish manufacturer finished 2011 with a little more than €10 billion ($13.1 billion) in net sales — 11 percent higher than Q3, but 21 percent lower than 2010, when Nokia raked in about €12.7 billion (approximately $16.7 billion). Operating profit, meanwhile, rose by 90 percent over Q3, but is still down on the year by a whopping 56 percent; this quarter, in fact, saw an operating loss of €954 million (about $1.3 billion). Its net cash and liquid assets also dropped by €1.4 billion over the year, marking a 20 percent decline. The general takeaway, then, is that things are looking better than they were last quarter, but worse than they were last year.

To date, the company has sold “well over” one million Lumia devices, but this Windows Phone surge has apparently come at Symbian‘s expense. “In certain markets, there has been an acceleration of the anticipated trend towards lower-priced smartphones with specifications that are different from Symbian’s traditional strengths,” CEO Stephen Elop said in a statement. “As a result of the changing market conditions, combined with our increased focus on Lumia, we now believe that we will sell fewer Symbian devices than we previously anticipated.” Looking forward, Nokia expects to break even during the first quarter of 2012, due in part to lower than expected seasonal sales and what it calls “competitive industry dynamics.” For the full report, check out the source link below.

Nokia releases Q4 2011 earnings report: operating profits drop, Lumia sales break one million originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 26 Jan 2012 06:24:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Samsung’s HD Displays to Deploy PenTile Matrix Technology

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When Samsung introduced their Galaxy S II flagship, one of the biggest enhancement over its predecessor was the inclusion of a Super AMOLED Plus display. The differentiating factor between the two was the move from a PenTile matrix display to a screen that featured true RGB pixels, providing a much smoother representation of color and increased clarity. However, with the announcement of their behemoth Samsung Galaxy Note and its 5.3-inch HD display, the Korean manufacturer has arguably taken a step back in terms of screen technology. While screen resolution is improved in the Note and the recently announced Samsung Galaxy S II HD thanks to the new Super AMOLED HD display, the absence of the “Plus” modifier indicates a regression back to PenTile technology.

PenTile displays work by assigning only two colored subpixels to each pixel, rather than three RGB subpixels as found in the Galaxy S II and its Super AMOLED Plus screen. With a PenTile matrix screen, certain colors must be approximated by combining the subpixels of two adjacent pixels, creating colors that don’t read as true and images with sharply crosshatched edges under close examination. If that all seems confusing, the basic takeaway is that a PenTile screen effectively only displays images at half the advertised resolution.

PenTile displays recently deployed by Motorola have faced scrutiny for the above mentioned problems, but initial reviews of the Galaxy Note don’t seem to attribute the same issues to the oversized handset’s display. Perhaps this is due to the increased HD resolution masking some of the issues normally associated with screens deploying PenTile matrix technology. For better or worse, it would seem this same display will find its way to the Samsung Galaxy Nexus. Perhaps we will simply have to wait for the Samsung Galaxy S III for a proper Super AMOLED HD Plus display.

[via thegadgetlife | Thanks, Abir]

 


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Honeycomb Demonstrated on Intel Oak Trail ‘Green Ridge’ Development Tablet at Computex [VIDEO]

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It seems like Intel has been developing their line of Atom CPUs for Android for quite some time now without much to show. A few Google TV boxes and promises of upcoming devices utilizing the Atom architecture are all we have. At Computex, however, we were treated to several prototype tablets from Intel utilizing their latest Oak Trail chip. Showcased was the ‘Green Ridge’ development platform sporting a fully functional build of Honeycomb. Perhaps the biggest takeaway here is that it works, and works quite well. See for yourself in the above video.


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EVO 3D review by an Android Central reader

HTC EVO 3D

Fun fact about being a smartphone blogger — we get to see the latest and greatest toys pretty early. But we’re not the only ones. Sometimes you all get your hands on a phone before it’s released, too. And such is the case with Android Central Forums member slag02, who recently came across the HTC EVO 3D at the Futurallia conference in Kansas City and wrote up his thoughts for us all. His takeaway?

All in all – the EVO 3D is what the EVO should have been at launch ( except the 3d part) — and a Great device if you’re looking for something new. It will be hands-down the best phone on Sprint when its released.

We’re expecting (or at least hoping pretty hard) for a launch date announcement any day now. But if you’re still deciding whether to plop down $50 for a preorder, whether at Best Buy or Radio Shack, check out slag02′s review at the link below and see if it doesn’t sway you.

Source: Android Central Forums. Thanks, Christopher!


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