Posts Tagged wifi

Tri-band variant of Sprint Galaxy S4 receiving update to enable Wifi Calling

No word on update for original Galaxy S4 on the carrier

The tri-band Galaxy S4 (that’s the one with Sprint Spark capabilities) is the latest Sprint device to get the recently-introduced Wifi Calling feature. This means after the update you’ll be able to make completely free calls when connected to Wifi without the potential of using up your minutes if you don’t have an unlimited talk plan.

Best of all the service itself is free, with no strings attached — your phone will handle the move to Wifi calling seamlessly in the background. The update for Wifi Calling will be rolling out to all tri-band Galaxy S4s (sorry, the original Galaxy S4 isn’t included in this rollout) starting today, with all updates being completed in a few weeks.

Sprint still plans to bring Wifi Calling to additional devices throughout the year, but it’s good to see it at least getting to the most popular devices first.

Source: Sprint



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Sprint brings WiFi calling to the Galaxy S4 with an update

Galaxy S4

The Sprint Spark compatible Samsung Galaxy S4 is getting a minor update today bringing the WiFi calling feature to the device. The carrier currently supports three other devices with its WiFi calling feature and plans to add plenty more devices in the coming months.

WiFi calling basically allows users to make phone calls and send text messages using the WiFi networks rather than depending on cellular networks. In addition to being light on your wallets, this will also reduce the battery consumption of your smartphone.

Note that only the new Sprint Spark capable Galaxy S4 will be getting the update with no word on the standard variant of the Galaxy S4 yet. As with any device getting the WiFi calling update, users will have to register their desired WiFi networks by signing into their Sprint account to allow access. You can find all the details on how to enable the feature from the link below.

Source: Sprint

Via: Phone Scoop

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Windows Phone 8.1 will automatically sign in to trustworthy WiFi

Wi-Fi Sense in Windows Phone 8.1

Tired of having to slog through web portals on your Windows Phone just to sign on to a coffee shop’s WiFi? That won’t be a problem once Windows Phone 8.1 arrives. Its Wi-Fi Sense feature can automatically accept the terms of use for networks that are both free and trustworthy, getting you online much faster than usual. You also won’t have to verbally share login details for your own WiFi network. You can securely share your router’s password with contacts in Facebook, Outlook.com and Skype, giving friends an internet connection (but not full network access) without setting up a guest mode. If you’re the sort who sometimes avoids WiFi because of the hassles involved, you may want to give Microsoft’s mobile OS a closer look.

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Polaroid XS100i Action Cam review

When it comes to “action cams”, the choices can be expensive. A basic GoPro setup can run upwards of $500, and while some lesser-known offerings may cost a lot less, they tend to offer mixed results. The Polaroid XS100i is an action camera that may not offer all that a GoPro would, but in many ways we found it to be a really good choice for those looking for good performance without wanting to drop a lot of cash.

Hardware

The XS100i is pretty straightforward in design, and has some intrinsic benefits because of the form factor. The white barrel profile has a bright red frame around the lens, which is great for knowing exactly where the camera is when you’re filming yourself, or having others look at the camera. The buttons up top, which control the recording, are simple and easy to use; there is almost no messing things up with the XS100i’s two button design. Around back a plate twists off to reveal other settings you will definiely need over time: WiFi button, HD or FHD switch, microSD card slot, HDMI port, and charging port.

Polaroid XS100i Rear AC

The camera powering the shoot is a 1/2.5” CMOS sensor with an F2.8 fixed-focus lens. It can snap still images at 16MP, 5MP, 3MP, or VGA. For video, you can get 720p at either 30 or 60fps with a 16:9 aspect ratio, 960p at 30fps (though that’s a 4:3 aspect ratio), or 1080p at 30fps with a 16:9 aspect ratio. It supports up to a 32GB microSD card, which Polaroid says can power four hours of full HD shooting. If you don’t want to use — or just don’t have — a microSD card, the XS100i comes with 32GB internal storage as well, but you will need a microSD card to set the time and date.

With the package, you’ll also get every mount or strap you could want or likely need. A few different joints give you access to any angle you could think of, and a helmet mount will give that first-person action perspective you may be looking for. Polaroid put in some adhesive mounts as well, and there is a mount-lock for affixing your camera to just about any structure you could think.

One thing we really like about the XS100i is that it’s got a really low profile. The barrel design lets it work in many more places than a square camera, and it’s waterproof to 10 meters — surfers, take notice. At 4.8 ounces, it’s not even noticeable while on, and makes a really neat accessory to carry around for non-action activities.

Polaroid XS100i Side AC

Performance

Stills came out wonderful, and using it on a tripod mount was easy. For stills, we recommend using the accompanying Android or iOS apps, which can be found on both the Play Store and App Store. The lack of a viewfinder on the XS100i might be the lone annoyance, but a smartphone app makes those concerns almost moot. In an odd way, we really like the dual-device set-up, especially if you’re posing a product or fiddling with light. You know when it looks good to the camera, regardless of where you are in relation to it. When you snap a pic, the camera gives off a little vibration.

POlaroid XS100i front AC

A quick word about the apps and setup: they’re a bit tricky. One app is for controlling the camera remotely, and another is for file management. We would prefer these be the same app, as traveling between two can be cumbersome in a pinch. The remote viewfinder app also doesn’t support landscape mode, which is a bit of a bother.

Videos were also beautiful, and using the app is again our recommendation. The XS100i saves video as MP4 (and pics as JPEG), making them really useful for editing later. No fussy video file to convert or toy with — just shoot, upload, and go. Nothing could be simpler for an action camera.

Plaroid w Android AC

Conclusion

Save for the lack of viewfinder, the XS100i is a really nice action cam. Waterproof, durable (I dropped it twice…), and stylish, the XS100i is one we can highly recommend. The WiFi version will run you $179.99 for the full kit, while the non WiFi version is $129.99. We tested the WiFi version, which is what powers access to controlling the settings and such via the apps. The non-WiFi version won’t offer you that, so we highly recommend you spend the extra coin for the WiFi variety.

We’re not fond of the apps, sadly. Though it’s a nice trick to allow us to use our Android devices for powering the camera, the apps were a touch fussy and combersome. For WiFi, you have to connect the camera to a “real” WiFi signal via the file app, then connect your phone to the camera. That produces a bit of lag, naturally, and the app interface itself is dated and slow. It’s entirely usable, but we think Polaroid could have done much better, here.

Polaroid App AC

The shutter speed is also a bit slow, which is really noticeable in burst mode. For snapping posed shots, the XS100i is just fine. Video is the real attraction here, and the camera does so admirably. We’ve been testing it for a week or so and had no problems with video whatsoever. If you’re looking for a video camera that can snap pics like a camera, though, this one isn’t for you.

For those looking to shoot great action video, or just have a low-profile video camera handy, the XS100i is a good option. The apps, while a bit cumbersome, prove a good workaround for the camera not having a viewfinder. We really enjoy the ability to be away from the device and snap photos or start and stop video. The utility is great, but the interface on the apps slow this one down. Would we buy it? Absolutely. In actual testing, it didn’t let us down one bit, even surviving a night out in a rainy Oregon storm.

Polaroid XS100i close AC

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Sprint launches WiFi Calling, access starts today for two devices

sprint-logo

Owners of the Samsung Galaxy Mega and Galaxy S 4 Mini on Sprint’s network should be expecting a software update very soon. That is because Sprint has launched WiFi Calling and those two devices are the first to gain access. Unsurprisingly, WiFi Calling will allow all calls and messages to take place over a WiFi network. The update for the Galaxy Mega and Galaxy S 4 Mini will be rolling out over the next few weeks.

Let us know in the comments if you have gotten the update!

Source: Sprint

Come comment on this article: Sprint launches WiFi Calling, access starts today for two devices

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Sprint launches WiFi calling, only select Androids get access

sprintceodanhesse3-620x369

Sprint users are getting a treat today in the form of WiFi calling, a new service that gives subscribers the ability to place calls and sends texts over a wireless network for absolutely free. There is a catch, though. WiFi calling, as of now, is only available on an extremely select number of Android handsets — two, to be exact.

The Samsung Galaxy Mega and Samsung Galaxy S4 Mini are, as of now, the only device’s in Sprint’s stable that will enable users to avoid any limits or charges associated with their standard wireless service by routing calls over any WiFi network. These handset will be able to take advantage of the feature after receiving an over-the-air update.

If those seem like odd choices as the flagship devices for Sprint’s WiFi calling, they are, but fear not. Sprint says more devices will be receiving the capabilities as the year rolls on. For now, current Galaxy Mega and Galaxy S4 Mini owners can expect the needed update to arrive sometime in the coming weeks.

[via Sprint]

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Sony Xperia Z1 and Z Ultra updated with white balance setting

Xperia Z1 white balance

Other changes include improvements to Wifi, Bluetooth streaming and the stock email app 

Just a month after the Sony Xperia Z1 and Z Ultra were updated to Android 4.3 Jelly Bean, there's a second 4.3-based firmware rolling out to both handsets. Sony has confirmed via Twitter that the update is rolling out in stages starting today, with "display, BT [Bluetooth] music streaming, email, Wifi improvements," among other changes. The only real difference we've noticed on our European Z1 is the addition of a "white balance" option under display settings, allowing users to tweak the color characteristics of their screens.

The update to version 14.2.A.1.136 seems to be available only through Sony's PC Companion and Mac Bridge apps at present — presumably an over-the-air rollout will kick off in the near future.

    



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Will WiFi calling ever be enough?

Scratch Wireless Wifi

In recent weeks, MVNOs have been in the limelight, due to marketing efforts by their brands and parent networks. Mobile virtual network operators — companies that offer their own brand of mobile service, while running over the networks of the more established carriers — are meant to offer a differentiated product, compared with the bigger networks. MVNOs often provide a cheaper service than the bigger brands.

A few examples are Republic Wireless, Freedompop  and Straight Talk, among others. Many of these MVNOs offer prepaid services, which enables users to better monitor their usage. Some offer more unique services, however, like Truphone, which is actually marketed as a global roaming SIM, compatible with a variety of carriers around the world.

Sprint recently launched its Scratch Wireless service, which offers free and unlimited talk and texting service through WiFi. The business model deviates from the usual mobile contract. With Scratch, you buy the phone outright ($269 for the Motorola Photon Q QWERTY-slider phone), and service is free henceforth, at least if you will be sticking with WiFi.

The service comes with unlimited texting on cellular, but if you want to make calls or access the Internet, you will need to be connected to a WiFi network. Outside of WiFi, however, users can buy cellular minutes or 3G data in bundles. The $1.99 bundle gets you 25MB or 30 minutes good for 24 hours. The $14.99 bundle comes with either 200MB of data or 250 minutes good for 30 days.

Do you spend most of your time connected to WiFi?

According to Sprint, the average user in the US spends about 80 percent of their time connected to a WiFi network, anyway. For those times when you need cellular connectivity, the add-on bundles are just a few taps away. Users can activate these through a dedicated app, and the amount will be debited directly from their registered credit (or debit) cards.

There are, of course, pros and cons to this arrangement. Being an IP-based system, Scratch Wireless calls and texts will be free and unlimited regardless of where the user is in the world. You can be roaming in other countries and still make and receive calls and SMS using the same number.

The obvious disadvantage, of course, is the limited connectivity while outside of WiFi coverage. What if there’s an emergency back at home, and your folks can’t reach you, for example? SMS is still free, but sometimes text messaging is not enough.

And as for data, isn’t mobile connectivity the point in getting a smartphone in the first place? I would want to be able to get notifications for chats and emails while on the move. One might miss a few notifications if my phone does not have access to the Internet in between home, school or the workplace, for example.

App alternatives

Users who would rather not use services like Scratch Wireless do have alternatives, in the form of mobile apps and networks such as Skype, Viber, WhatsApp and the like. Most already offer free calling within network, and users can also make calls to regular telephones through SkypeOut and ViberOut, if necessary. Google Voice and Google Hangouts could also be a good alternative. These already offer free calls and SMS to US numbers. Why not just get a cheap prepaid data plan and use VoIP for calls and messaging?

The difference, of course, is the fallback mechanism. With services like Scratch Wireless, you can be reached through the same number whether you’re on WiFi or cellular — assuming, of course, you are communicating via SMS or that you have a voice bundle activated.

Is there a market?

Services like Scratch Wireless do have a market. Users living in the city are likely to have good enough coverage through WiFi. It’s a good deal for students on a budget, who most likely have WiFi connectivity in school and at home, anyway. It could also be a great backup phone, especially for people who frequently travel internationally.

It’s certainly not for everyone. But for people who would rather not spend 60 bucks a month for calls, text and data, this would be a good deal. Now if Sprint, et al, could only enable this service for more devices other than the Motorola Photon Q (a 2012 device!).

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Scratch Wireless WiFi-first wireless service opens

Scratch Wireless first arrived several months earlier when they announced plans to fight the other, “too expensive” cellular service options. They are an MVNO style carrier and will be going on the premise of using WiFi first. Well, while the service first launched as an invite-only offering, they have since shifted and are now open for any and all that wish to check it out.

scratch-wireless-540-540x354

Scratch Wireless goes on the concept that people are connected to WiFi networks roughly 80 percent of the time. To that point, the service offers free calling over WiFi. Of course, you can also use data as would normally would on any other WiFi device. One interesting aspect of the service is with text messaging — free over both WiFi and cellular.

For those times when you are not connected to WiFi and need to make a call or get online, Scratch Wireless does offer cellular passes. These make use of the Sprint cellular network and include options for data and voice. A 24-hour pass for either will set you back $1.99 and a 30-day pass is $14.99. The 24-hour pass includes 30 minutes of voice calling or 25MB of data. The 30-day pass ups those to 250 minutes and 200MBs respectively.

To recap, calling is free on WiFi and data is free on WiFi. You can get a cellular pass for voice and/or data. And lastly, text messaging is free regardless of whether you are connected to a cellular of WiFi network. While this is all low enough in price so far, the catch comes in with buying the phone. Scratch Wireless users will be required to buy a compatible phone, which in this case means just one option.

The available phone is the slider-style Motorola Photon Q, which is priced at $269. Bottom line here, if you are good using the Photon Q and live in a world where you are almost always connected to WiFi, Scratch Wireless may be one to consider.

VIA: The Next Web

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Sony Xperia Z WiFi Connection Keeps Dropping [Troubleshooting Guide]

xperia z wifiAmong the most common problems any smartphone user could encounter is the dropping of the internet connection irrespective whether you are using mobile data or WiFi. Sony Xperia Z owners already have their share of the problem. While others say the phone is inclined to drop WiFi connection more often than others, there is no solid evidence that could prove such claim. It is however, safe to assume that Xperia Z is no different from other Android phones that could also be plagued by the issue. But the thing is, there is a lot of things you can do to troubleshoot, fix and prevent it from happening.

Troubleshooting Procedures

Reboot phone, turn WiFi on and off. The first thing you should look into is the possibility that it is only a temporary device issue affecting WiFi. To eliminate this possibility, it is recommended you restart your Sony Xperia Z. Once the phone has rebooted, turn the WiFi off and on again to refresh data needed to connect to a network. You can do this procedure in a minute or two and it oftentimes solve minor WiFi problems.

Restart router. Many of WiFi-related problems were caused by faulty routers so you cannot just eliminate this possibility. However, one way to know if your router is causing the problem is by restarting (powercycling) it. Doing so will refresh your entire network. For those who just purchased a new router, make sure it is WiFi certified. You could also know the performance of your network by using other IP-capable devices such as laptops and tablets to connect to your network. If they can connect and browse the web just fine, your router is fine.

Make sure you are within good range. When you’re getting 1 or 2 bars only, there is always a tendency the connection will drop because of the inconsistency in transmission. If you can, move a little closer to the hotspot to get good connection.

Remove protective case. While these cases can give you peace of mind, there are some of those that interfere with the signal. In case the WiFi drops after you put one of those, remove it to verify if it’s the one that causes signal dropouts.  If it does, find one that doesn’t.

Turn WiFi sleep policy to ‘Always’. By default, WiFi connection in Android is set to disconnect whenever the phone goes into idle mode. This is a part of Android’s core system that minimizes battery consumption when the device is not in use. To eliminate this possibility, here’s what you need to do:

  1. From the Home screen, tap Apps.
  2. Find and tap Settings > Wi-Fi.
  3. Press Menu.
  4. Tap Advanced.
  5. Tap Keep Wi-Fi on during sleep.
  6. Select an option.

Change router security settings. If you have full access over the network you connect to and has basic knowledge on router settings, you might want to try to change the network security you’re using. You can check the user guide of the router or contact your router manufacturer for instructions.

Try using static IP address. Service providers often give subscribers dynamic IP addresses but if you happen to have one static IP address, you might want to call your provider and ask for correct settings. Here’s how you manually set the IP address on your Sony Xperia Z:

  1. From your Home screen, tap Apps.
  2. Find and tap Settings > Wi-Fi.
  3. Touch and hold the network you are connected to.
  4. Tap Modify network.
  5. Mark the Show advanced options box.
  6. Under IP settings, select Static.
  7. Scroll down and enter the required settings.
  8. Tap Save.

Check for firmware updates. This is applicable to both your phone and your router. You can contact your router’s manufacturer for instructions and you can check under Settings in your phone for some Android updates.

Factory reset. We don’t usually recommend this because there are a lot of things to do. But if anything else fails, it is your last option. More often, for WiFi problems that cannot seem to be fixed, this procedure often helps.

Problems with your phone?

Email us at mailbag@thedroidguy.com and we will help you find solutions. Please be detailed as much as possible so that we will know where to start and how we can help you better. However, we cannot guarantee that we could respond to every email we receive.

The post Sony Xperia Z WiFi Connection Keeps Dropping [Troubleshooting Guide] appeared first on The Droid Guy.

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Hotspotio lets you share your WiFi connection with friends in return for favors

Hotspotio WiFi for Favors featured

Fresh out the Google Play Store is an all new app called Hotpotio. Similar to apps like Instabridge that allow you to quickly and easily share your WiFi with friends and acquaintances, Hotspotio provides a fun new twist: favors.

Since nothing in life is free, Hotspotio allows WiFi sharers to request specific favors (non-sexual) in order to gain access to their WiFi network. Available options range everywhere from hugs (lame), drinks (awesome), to a likes or follows on Facebook/Twitter, or you could even request someone sing you a song. Less of an actual requirement, and more like a fun way to share your WiFi connection with others, sharers are also granted another huge benefit — access to not only their friends WiFi networks, but friends of friends as well. You can even make it public to all Hotspotio users if you’re feeling especially generous.

Hotspotio WiFi sharing network

Think of Hotspotio like one big, WiFi swapping, hippy community. You can even turn your Android device into a portable hotspot, sharing your phone’s internet connection while hanging out at your local coffee shop. Don’t feel comfortable sharing your WiFi connection with strangers? Settings in the app allow you to select who you want to share with, just don’t forget you’ll be missing out on a whole lotta free hugs. You can download Hotspotio for free right now in the Google Play Store.

[Hotspotio on Google Play]

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Imo adds video call over WiFi and cellular to Android and iOS apps

DNP IMO IM video chat

Imo users, brush your hair and powder your nose, as you might be in for some face-to-face conversation — now that the IM aggregator has added video calls to its repertoire. It was initially released to a small group of beta testers, but the feature, which is the app’s biggest update since launching free voice calls, is available both on Google’s platform and on iOS starting today. After you’ve updated the app, you’ll see a camera icon next to a contact’s name that you can use to initiate a video chat. It’ll work over WiFi and cellular (3G / 4G) regardless of the messenger service, so long as the person you’re calling is also logged into Imo. If you’d like to give the new feature a shot despite being married to another video chat app (or two — as you likely are), hit the source links below.

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Source: Imo (Android), (iPhone), (iPad)

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Samsung Galaxy S4 Unable To Connect To A WiFi Network [Troubleshooting Guide]

galaxy s3 wifi problemsAmong the problems early adopters of the Samsung Galaxy S4 complained about was related to Wi-Fi connectivity. Some reported they were unable to connect to their network while using a specific security type while others said they simply cannot connect. It took about a month after the release of the flagship that Samsung acknowledged the new device had some issues with some models of routers. The claim were seconded by D-Link who said that there were only two models that were affected by what appeared to be a minor WiFi bug.

With all those inherent issues resolved and after millions of people bought the phone, many are still complaining they were unable to connect to a WiFi network. The way I see it, there are only four possible causes and they are as follow:

  • WiFi network has weak signal or not in range.
  • WiFi login credentials incorrect.
  • Router has a problem.
  • Network’s MAC filtering enabled.

GS4 Weak WiFi Reception

When your phone detects a network with a weak signal, it could mean one thing: you won’t be able to get good connectivity because either you’ll be kicked off the network when the signal drops or you simply cannot connect.

We, however, received numerous emails describing this very same problem and majority of the owners said they are trying to connect to their own network at home. So, distance is never a factor here.

If you were able to connect to your network without having any problems before, the occurrence of this issue might just be temporary.

The first thing you need to do is to soft reset the phone by turning it off, taking the battery out for 30 seconds, then turn the phone back on. After doing this, try to “forget” the network you’re trying to connect to and let the phone detect it again as it would refresh all necessary data for better connectivity.

If doing the previous step won’t solve the problem, try to see if power-cycling your router would help. More often, when connectivity problems arise, it’s the router that’s not properly sending out the signal.

After doing those two procedures and your phone is still getting a weak signal or not at all, backup all your data and do a factory reset.

WiFi Credentials Incorrect

It may sound strange but a lot of owners were complaining they couldn’t connect to their own network simply because their WiFi password won’t work. Of course, the most common advise we could give is “check your password to see if it’s correct.” Then, the owners would reply “yes, my password was right because I didn’t change anything in my network.”

At this point, the simple authentication problem turned out to be a bit complicated. The most logical thing to do is to change the network security type to “Open,” which means no password or authentication requirements. This is, of course, applicable to owners who have full access to their network. If you can connect after doing so, perhaps it’s time you change your password to something else and set the network back to require authentication.

However, if the problem persists after the above procedure, “Forget” your WiFi network from your device and let it detect the new one. Check to see if you can connect without having greeted by an error. If you can, then the problem was with the network data saved in your phone. Clearing them will force the phone to cache new ones and the process often solves the problem.

In case the problem continues to bug you after doing the first two procedures, try to connect to your network using a computer or another smartphone. If you can connect and browse the web with different devices, the problem is with the phone. You can either factory reset it or have an appointment with an authorized technician, who may also end up factory-resetting your phone before doing a general device inspection. Thus, you need to backup all your data.

Router Has A Problem

As what I mentioned earlier, when connectivity problems occur without apparent reason, it is more likely caused by a faulty router.

But before you actually call the hotline of your service provider and demand a replacement, which may take a day or two at the earliest, you may want to do what the reps call “power cycle.”

Simply turn the router off (or you can unplug it from the power source) for about a minute, then turn it back on. Wait about a minute or two (or more) before trying to connect to your network. Sometimes routers may take a little while to boot up and send out a signal.

If your router is connected to a modem, turn it off first then the modem. When turning them back on, go for the modem first then the router. At least, that’s the proper way of power-cycling your network devices.

When all of these procedures fail, call for support, demand a replacement and tell the rep you already did all necessary troubleshooting steps to no avail.

MAC Filtering Enabled

If you have full access to your network, it would be easy to fix this problem. You simply have to log into your router settings and turn filtering off or add the MAC address of your device. To keep your network security tight, we suggest you do the latter. Here’s how you find the MAC address of your Galaxy S4:

  1. Go to the Home screen.
  2. Tap the Menu key.
  3. Tap Settings.
  4. Scroll to and tap About Phone.
  5. Scroll down and find your phone’s MAC address.

Doing the procedure would surely fix the problem given that MAC filtering is the reason why you can’t connect to your network. If adding your device’s MAC address, however, won’t solve the problem, try turning off the filtering this time and see if you can, otherwise, there’s some problem with your router or network as well.

Having problems with your phone?

Tell us about them by emailing us at mailbag@thedroidguy.com. Make sure to include as much details as possible so that we could understand the problem well and find the best solutions for you. If you can share a screenshot or two, that would be better.

We may not be able to respond to every email we receive but rest assured we do read them… yes, all of them even if some do look like spams.

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Chromecast balks at super-long Wifi passwords

ChromecastHere's an interesting one from yubeie in our Chromecast forums:

The Chromecast was successfully purchased and installed, but it wouldn't connect to the Wifi network. The culprit, it seems, was yubeie's 128-freakin'-character password. (A bit of which you can see here.) "Could not communicate with your Chromecast" was all the error message read.

That's … quite the password. The good news is that changing it to something slightly less ridiculously robust seemed to do the trick.

So let that be a lesson to you, boys and girls. Chromecast doesn't like 128-character passwords.

    

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Infuse 1.3 for iOS adds AirPlay video streaming, web-based WiFi transfers

Infuse 13 for iOS adds AirPlay, webbased WiFi syncing

FireCore’s Infuse app is already handy for iOS users who want to play less common video formats; with the 1.3 release, it might prove vital. The new version brings AirPlay, letting viewers push any of 14 video codecs to their Apple TV. Transfers should also be simple now that users can use a web browser or FTP client to copy videos over WiFi. There’s even a social aspect to 1.3 — Infuse now sends play counts and ratings to trakt.tv, and users can advertise what they’re watching through Facebook and Twitter. If VLC for iOS isn’t quite your cup of tea, you can spend $5 at the App Store to try FireCore’s take on mobile movie playback.

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Via: FireCore Blog

Source: App Store

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Galaxy S4 Asks For WiFi Password Every Time, WiFi Turns Itself Off Automatically

gs4-wifi-settings

This post will answer questions or address problems related to Samsung Galaxy S4 WiFi connectivity. While only one email message will be shown here, we have already received tons of questions related to it. Here is the actual email from one of our readers:

I have internet service through my home phone AT&T. I have a wireless modem. I have to enter my password every time I leave my home and return.  The phone detects the modem but I am required to enter the password. Why doesn’t the Galaxy S4 remember/save the password? Is there a setting to fix this? 

Another issue is my WiFi will be off and I have not turned it off. If I’m in an area that does not have WiFi, is there a setting that causes the WiFi to turn off?”

Basically, there are two problems here:

  1. Galaxy S4 always asks for WiFi network password every time the owner tries to connect.
  2. The WiFi automatically turns itself off. (The owner didn’t specify whether the disconnection problem happens while the phone was in use or not.)

Why doesn’t the Galaxy S4 remember/save the password? Is there a setting to fix this?

Yes, there is a fix to it. It’s actually just a matter of ticking a checkbox so the device would automatically connect to a trusted / saved network. Here’s how to do it:

  1. From the Home screen, tap the Menu key.
  2. Tap Settings then touch the Connections tab.
  3. Tap WiFi, then tap the Menu key again.
  4. Touch Advanced.
  5. Tick the option Auto Connect.

The Auto Connect option allows your device to automatically connect to a saved network whenever the phone is within range.

Another issue is my WiFi will be off and I have not turned it off.

Due to the power-saving features of the Galaxy S4, WiFi will be turned off the moment the phone goes to sleep or becomes idle for several minutes. But you can set the device to continue connecting to the network while other processes are being stopped. Here’s how…

  1. From the Home screen, tap the Menu key.
  2. Tap Settings then touch the Connections tab.
  3. Tap WiFi, then tap the Menu key again.
  4. Touch Advanced.
  5. Tap the option Keep WiFi On During Sleep.
  6. Tick Always.

This is just one angle of solving the problem. Let’s try to look at it from another angle; this time, let’s dwell on the network problem.

Modems and routers needed to be refreshed from time to time. When is the last time you power-cycled your modem? If you can’t remember when, then today may be the best time to do it.

  1. Unplug your modem (then the router if you have one).
  2. Let it rest for a minute.
  3. Plug your modem again (it may take 30 seconds or a minute before the modem can boot up).
  4. In your phone, go to WiFi settings and forget your network.
  5. Let the phone detect your network again and connect.

Having problems with your phone?

Tell us about them by emailing us at mailbag@thedroidguy.com. Make sure to include as much details as possible so that we could understand the problem well and find the best solutions for you. If you can share a screenshot or two, that would be better.

We may not be able to respond to every email we receive but rest assured we do read them… yes, all of them even if some do look like spams.

The post Galaxy S4 Asks For WiFi Password Every Time, WiFi Turns Itself Off Automatically appeared first on The Droid Guy.

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Samsung Galaxy Note II Can’t Connect To WiFi

gn2-wifi

The Galaxy Note II was one of Samsung’s most stable devices, however, some owners are still troubled with some problems. One of our readers emailed us asking why her phone cannot connect to any WiFi network. While the email message didn’t exactly describe the problem, I will try to cover the possible reasons why this problem happens.

The email:

Good day All

I bought my Gallexy Note II in March 2013. I cannot connect to Wi-Fi, even when I am at a zone where it is much stronger. Can you please advise me on what to do. I have an app that needs to be updated through Wi-Fi but I cannot update it because of the current problem I am coming accross

Kind Regards

Caroline

Step 1. Make sure WiFi is turned on.

I know it sounds stupid but it’s a necessary step to be able to resolve this problem. From the Home screen, tap and drag the notification bar down. Tap the WiFi icon once or twice so that its color would turn neon green, which means it’s on.

Step 2: Scan for available networks.

After turning on the WiFi, go to Settings => WiFi. As long as you’re within range, you should see available networks on your screen. Tap the network you want to connect to, enter credentials and try to browse the web.

These two steps alone are what you need to be able to connect to any WiFi network. If errors popup during the process, heed to what the device is telling you. But the possible or most common problems you can encounter are the following:

Authentication Error – it means that the credentials you entered like the password are incorrect. Of course, you need to know the correct ones to be able to connect to the network.

Random Disconnection – it’s either the modem / router or the phone itself is causing the problem. If it’s with the network, a simple power-cycle could solve the problem. However, if the disconnection happens when the phone sleeps, the ‘Keep WiFi On During Sleep’ option should be set to ‘Always’ under the Advanced WiFi settings.

Can’t Detect Network – this one’s a bit complicated but knowing that the device we’re talking about in this post is a Samsung Galaxy, there is a possibility that the network the user wants to connect is an ad hoc connection; all Galaxy devices don’t support this kind of connection. Naturally so, the Note 2 cannot detect any signal transmitted using this type of connection.

Device Refuses To Connect – if you’ve done all the possible troubleshooting procedures but the phone still refuses to connect, it could be a hardware problem. Have an appointment with an authorized technician to have the phone checked.

As a workaround, try to use the mobile data if you badly need an internet connection.

Having problems with your phone?

Tell us about them by emailing us at mailbag@thedroidguy.com. Make sure to include as much details as possible so that we could understand the problem well and find the best solutions for you. If you can share a screenshot or two, that would be better.

We may not be able to respond to every email we receive but rest assured we do read them… yes, all of them even if some do look like spams.

The post Samsung Galaxy Note II Can’t Connect To WiFi appeared first on The Droid Guy.

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Galaxy S4 WiFi and Data Work Simultaneously, WiFi Keeps Disconnecting

galaxy s4 wifi problems

Have you ever experienced having both your WiFi and Mobile Data turned on at the same time? Well, you probably did especially if you’re an owner of the new Samsung Galaxy S4. Hundreds of owners turned to online forums to air their problems regarding this issue. Since we have a dedicate mailbox for our readers’ problems, we also received emails related to it.

Here is one email that describes the problem:

Hey Droidguy,

I’m responding to your article on the S4′s WIFI problems.

My problem is simply that S4 often keeps disconnecting and then reconnecting to my home network. Right now as I speak my “Connected to Wi-Fi network” keeps popping up on my screen…and it also will switch from WiFi to data back to WiFi really quickly.

It just does all kind of strange unstable things when it comes to my home network. I work at Best Buy and I can stay connected to that network although it’s jam packed with a ton of devices making it very sluggish.

BTW I have read about the incompatibility with the S4 and DLink routers. I currently have a duel band Netgear. Thanks for taking your time to read my email. BTW I have fiddled with my router settings but I’m not too savvy when it comes to manual network settings and such.

WiFi Disconnection Problem

Actually, the random WiFi disconnection issue on Galaxy S4 is not new anymore because since the day it was released, owners already experienced the problem. Many have resolved their problem by power-cycling their routers to refresh their home network. Others changed security type in their network settings and some were able to fix the problem by doing a factory reset on their phones, although we don’t actually recommend this solution more often.

In this specific case, however, I don’t think it’s a network problem. While this issue seems to be the main concern of our reader since it was mentioned first in the email, it is simply the outcome of the second problem.

Network Switching Problem

There could be plenty of reasons why Wi-Fi and data network switch on Galaxy S4. One of the most common reasons is that both have been enabled by the user. For power-saving purposes, smartphones prioritize WiFi over Mobile Data so when the phone is within range of both networks, 90% of the time it will choose WiFi but it will immediately switch to data in the absence of the former.

According to our reader, the network switching happens so fast. While I said earlier that it’s not a network problem, I would still advice our reader to power-cycle his router just to make sure. After all, it would take two minutes (tops) to reboot a router or a modem.

If you’re also experiencing this problem and you happen to be a Verizon customer, you may want to disable the Caller Name ID app that the carrier pre-installed on your phone.

  1. Go to Settings.
  2. Tap More.
  3. Choose Application Manager.
  4. Swipe to All tab.
  5. Scroll to and tap Caller Name ID.
  6. Tap Disable button.

After doing this, call Verizon’s customer service hotline and request for a credit especially if this problem has been bugging you for weeks or months already.

Do let us know if this works for you.

Having problems with your phone?

Tell us about them by emailing us at mailbag@thedroidguy.com. Make sure to include as much details as possible so that we could understand the problem well and find the best solutions for you. If you can share a screenshot or two, that would be better.

We may not be able to respond to every email we receive but rest assured we do read them… yes, all of them even if some do look like spams.

The post Galaxy S4 WiFi and Data Work Simultaneously, WiFi Keeps Disconnecting appeared first on The Droid Guy.

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How To Fix A Galaxy Note 2 WiFi Auto Connect Problem

wifi-note-2-fix

If you’ve been an owner of the Galaxy Note 2 for quite a while now, you must have experienced your device automatically turned the WiFi on; it is a very common issue. But what made it so common is that it is not a carrier-specific problem. We have received a lot of emails from our readers asking us to research on this matter.

This post will provide recommendations on how to fix this auto connect problem with Galaxy Note 2. While we are optimistic the following procedures will remedy the issue, we cannot really guarantee an ultimate fix to the problem. In other words, these procedures may or may not work. However, we are open to your questions. So feel free to email us at mailbag@thedroidguy.com.

Here are some questions that may help you evaluate what caused the problem:

  1. 1.        Have you recently updated the operating system of your device?
  2. 2.        Have you installed apps that may trigger or turn the WiFi on?
  3. 3.       Does the problem occur when you’re in range of a trusted or saved network?
  4. 4.        Have you experienced this problem before? If so, what did you do to remedy it? 

The following are our recommendations that we believe would solve the problem. However, before doing any of those, we wanted you to turn your device’s WiFi off and reboot your device. Try to see if the problem still occurs after that. If so, then continue reading the troubleshooting procedures we prepared for you.

WiFi Auto Connects After OS Update

Majority of users who reported to have experienced the problem said it occurred shortly after they updated their device to the most recent version of Android Jelly Bean. It was not a bug. Otherwise, Samsung would have acknowledged it. Some XDA Developers said it can easily be fixed by clearing the dalvik cache (rooted) or by doing a factory reset.

Owners who manually installed a new firmware version into their device are advised to clear the dalvik cache right after the installation. The process will clear all cached app data that were saved in the previous installation. Once cleared, the phone will automatically recreate fresh copies of those files upon reboot and inconsistencies will be eliminated including inconsistencies on both WiFi and mobile data.

For owners who are using stock ROMs (original firmware), they are advised to do a factory reset. However, they need to BACKUP ALL IMPORTANT data in their phone before doing so. Here’s how to do a hard reset on the Galaxy Note 2:

  1. Go to Settings.
  2. Choose Privacy.
  3. Tap Factory Data Reset.

Alternatively, you can dial *2767*3855# on your phone to do the same job.

WiFi Auto Connects After Installing An App

There were also reports from owners that indicated the problem could also be caused by an app that required constant internet connection. It could be a game, a news app or an entertainment app that needs to update its local database so as to provide more accurate information. If you haven’t updated your OS and this problem occurred, it is more likely an app is causing it. Here’s what you’re going to do:

  1. Go to the most recently used apps by long-pressing the Home button.
  2. Find an app that looks suspicious. (More often you know/remember apps you’ve installed or use frequently.)
  3. Try to ‘freeze’ or disable the app that looks suspicious and see if the phone auto-connects with the WiFi network. If so, try to find a setting inside the app that may not allow it to connect automatically.
  4. If you can’t find the culprit in the most recent list, then try to recall the ones you recently installed.

Remember, this procedure is just a part of determining what causes the auto-connect behavior of your Galaxy Note 2. If you can’t find the culprit in the apps you installed, continue with other procedures.

WiFi Auto Connects When In Range Of Saved Network

Other owners reported that the problem could be replicated only when they have saved networks in their phone. If this is the case in yours, try to ‘forget’ all saved networks in your phone especially the ones that were saved for a long time already. If your GN2 came from Verizon, go to WiFi menu and hit the Menu capacitive button. Choose Advanced and uncheck the Auto Connect option. This procedure also goes for GN2 units under AT&T network.

Sprint has an app called Connections Optimizer that will automatically establish connections for the device. You can disable this so you could solve the auto-connect problem.

  1. Go to Settings.
  2. More Settings.
  3. Mobile Networks.
  4. Choose Connections Optimizer.

Disabling the app will solve this problem but will NEVER affect 3G/4G reception or connection.

Bottom Line

It is important you should look back to know if you’ve already experienced the problem before. If you did, the troubleshooting steps you may have done before may also work to resolve the same problem you are currently experiencing. After all, nobody knows your phone better than you. Again, the best way to reach us is through email at mailbag@thedroidguy.com.

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AT&T launches Enhanced Push-to-Talk for iPhone with WiFi calling

AT&T launches Enhanced PushtoTalk for iPhone with WiFi calling

When iOS has some sway with the corporate crowd, you can be sure that carriers with enterprise customers will notice — AT&T certainly has. It just released a version of Enhanced Push-to-Talk for Apple’s platform, letting workers with an iPhone 4S or iPhone 5 chat instantly with large groups. While there isn’t much novelty for anyone who has tried push-to-talk before, the iOS app is notable as AT&T’s first to support service over WiFi; poor cell reception won’t be an excuse for an extended lunch break. EPTT still requires an AT&T subscription, but those who’ve just recently jumped ship from Sprint’s soon-to-end iDEN service will be happy to hear that the app is free at the source link.

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Source: App Store

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Best Android apps for transferring files over WiFi [June 2013]

android-wifi-files

Recently, we did a guide on how to move files onto your Android device without using cables. We had quite a bit of feedback on what apps you thought were best suited to file transferring, so in this guide, we’re going to narrow down the topic and talk about the best apps for moving files from your PC to your Android device (and vice versa) through a WiFi network.

AirDroid

AirDroid was one of the most recommended apps for moving files across networks, and for good reason. AirDroid comes fully equipped to essentially use your phone without actually touching your phone and isn’t just limited to file transfers.

The initial set-up and connection is simple: when you first run the app from your phone, you’ll be asked to either sign in or register. You can use your email as a primary sign-in option or use a convenient Google, Facebook or Twitter alternate sign-in instead. After that initial set up, you’ll have a screen that shows two links to go to on your desktop: the AirDroid site for accessing your device over a same WiFi network or a specific IP address for accessing it remotely. For the sake of this guide, we’re mostly going to discuss being able to transfer files through WiFi, but if you ever need remote access away from home, AirDroid has you covered (although it does cap you at a 500 MB monthly limit of transfers).

Over WiFi though, there’s no limit to the amount of files you can transfer. AirDroid supports moving files from your PC onto your phone’s internal storage or SD card, but can also pull music, photos, ringtones, or anything else off of your device onto your PC. The speed is dependent on your router, but for most file transfers, it’s much quicker than going through the internet as a middleman.

At some points, it almost seems like AirDroid does too much. Your web browser page turns into a mini-homescreen for your device where you can text, play music, change ringtones, and even make phone calls (Phone calls require a premium key). From your computer, you can add shortcuts to specific contacts, upload files onto your device from web URLs,  and take screenshots of your phone’s display. It’s ridiculously powerful, incredibly well designed, and for WiFi transfers, it’s free. For a well-rounded utility app, AirDroid is hard to beat, especially for how easy it is to set up.

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Play Store Download Link

Wifi file explorer

WiFi File Explorer is similar to AirDroid with its network transferring capabilities, but it lacks all the other bells and whistles that AirDroid has. On one hand, it can be tough to recommend WiFi File Explorer over AirDroid because it lacks those features, but if you’re just looking for a light application to handle moving some songs and photos onto your device without all the extra fluff, WiFi File Explorer is arguably the better app.

Similar to AirDroid, after installing the application, it gives you an IP address to connect to on your computer’s web browser. This gives you full access to the files on your device, including internal memory and the SD card. From here, it’s easy to copy pictures from your phone to your computer, or move some music from your computer onto your device. There’s also a few small gauges to give you an idea of things like your WiFi strength and free space on your phone. Best of all, the app runs as a service, so you can keep doing anything else on your phone while files transfer.

There is a free and pro version of WiFi File Explorer, with the Pro version adding a handful of extra, handy features like copying multiple files at the same time.

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Play Store Download Link (Free)

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Play Store Download Link (Pro)

solid explorer

When thinking about transferring files to your device, file explorers aren’t generally the first things to come to mind, but some file explorer apps do support file browsing on a local network. Apps that do this basically allow you to browse your computer’s hard drive across a WiFi network as if it was an extra SD card in your phone, which is extremely quick and convenient.

Solid Explorer is one such file explorer that allows network connections by using an FTP connection. In SE’s menu, there’s a file sharing option. Selecting that will allow you to set up an FTP server and give you a corresponding address to connect to in either a web browser or a file explorer on your computer. The cool thing about that type of connection is that you can set up a bookmark in Windows Explorer that always connects to that one connection, so you can always access your phone’s storage just like you would access a music folder on your hard drive. It isn’t as pretty and it isn’t as simple, but if you want something that integrates into your existing PC setup, using Solid Explorer as an FTP connection on your WiFi network is an excellent option.

Solid Explorer isn’t the only option in the Play Store, but it scores some extra points for its root capabilities, holo theme, and the awesome dual-panel view when using the app in landscape orientation. The free application gives you a 14 day trial, but the app is only $1.99. It’s an excellent deal for a powerful file explorer.

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Play Store Download Link (Free)

es file explorer

Sometimes, you’re not going to want to use your PC to do all of your file management. For moving files onto your device using your phone as opposed to your computer, ES File Explorer has a relatively easy to set up feature that will allow you to browse your computer’s hard drive directly from your phone.

Setting up this type of connection is pretty quick, but it’s not automated. First off, you’re going to need to find the IP address on your computer. There’s a handful of ways to do this, but on Windows, the easiest way would be to go to your Network and Sharing Center, clicking your current network, then click the Properties button on the box that pops up. It’ll show a list of properties about your current network, but all you need is the IPv4 address that’s listed. Then, on ES File Explorer, you can tap the fast access button on the top left of the app, then select LAN connection from the Network drop down list. Tap the New button on the bottom left, type in your IP address from earlier in the Server box, then your PC’s user name and password. Click okay, and voila; instant access to any file on your computer hard drive. You can copy and move things around between your PC and your phone’s memory or SD card. ES will also make a shortcut that you can name to have quick access to your PC in the future.

The biggest advantage to using ES File Explorer like this is that you’ll be able to manage PC files from your phone instead of managing your phone’s files from your PC. Generally, most users would need to have access to their PC to get files moved around anyway, but in a pinch, ES is extremely useful to have.

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Play Store Download Link

samba_logo

Setting up a Samba server was one of the methods of file transferring we went over in our earlier guide, and compared to some of the other items on this list, it does have some advantages.

Samba Filesharing is the best app to set up a dedicated server on your phone, but it does require root to fully function. If your device is rooted, this app is worth a look. Samba Filesharing can be set to automatically run whenever your device is connected to a WiFi network, (or a particular WiFi network, if you only want it to run on your home network for security) so you can set it and forget it. Once it’s running, you can access your Android device like any other network drive. It’s extremely simple but still has plenty of power-user functions, such as WiFi white listing, web browser and Unix support if you’re using something like a Chromebook instead of a traditional Windows computer, and a handful of other features. Overall, the app is very simple and won’t bog you down in menus and settings to get up and running.

Samba Filesharing is available as a free app.

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Play Store Download Link

Did we miss any of your favorite apps for moving your files across a WiFi network? Let us know in the comments.

Come comment on this article: Best Android apps for transferring files over WiFi [June 2013]

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Sony Xperia Tablet Z now available in the UK

Xperia Tablet Z

On sale today, prices start at £399 for 16GB + Wifi

A couple of months after Sony first started taking pre-orders, its Xperia Tablet Z slate is now available to buy in the UK. Prices start at £399 for 16GB of storage and Wifi connectivity (black only), or you can opt for 32GB with Wifi (black and white) or 16GB with Wifi and 4G LTE connectivity (black only). The Tablet Z isn't the cheapest Android tablet option around, but it does boast a Snapdragon S4 Pro quad-core CPU inside, a 1080p display and Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, backed up by Sony's suite of apps. For the hacking crowd, there's also AOSP support through Sony's GitHub.

Across the Atlantic, Sony's still taking pre-orders for the Xperia Tablet Z through its official online store, with devices expected to ship out this Friday, May 24.

Source: Sony Store UK

    

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Sony Xperia Tablet Z now available in the UK

Xperia Tablet Z

On sale today, prices start at £399 for 16GB + Wifi

A couple of months after Sony first started taking pre-orders, its Xperia Tablet Z slate is now available to buy in the UK. Prices start at £399 for 16GB of storage and Wifi connectivity (black only), or you can opt for 32GB with Wifi (black and white) or 16GB with Wifi and 4G LTE connectivity (black only). The Tablet Z isn't the cheapest Android tablet option around, but it does boast a Snapdragon S4 Pro quad-core CPU inside, a 1080p display and Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, backed up by Sony's suite of apps. For the hacking crowd, there's also AOSP support through Sony's GitHub.

Across the Atlantic, Sony's still taking pre-orders for the Xperia Tablet Z through its official online store, with devices expected to ship out this Friday, May 24.

Source: Sony Store UK

    

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No Comments

Sony Xperia Tablet Z now available in the UK

Xperia Tablet Z

On sale today, prices start at £399 for 16GB + Wifi

A couple of months after Sony first started taking pre-orders, its Xperia Tablet Z slate is now available to buy in the UK. Prices start at £399 for 16GB of storage and Wifi connectivity (black only), or you can opt for 32GB with Wifi (black and white) or 16GB with Wifi and 4G LTE connectivity (black only). The Tablet Z isn't the cheapest Android tablet option around, but it does boast a Snapdragon S4 Pro quad-core CPU inside, a 1080p display and Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, backed up by Sony's suite of apps. For the hacking crowd, there's also AOSP support through Sony's GitHub.

Across the Atlantic, Sony's still taking pre-orders for the Xperia Tablet Z through its official online store, with devices expected to ship out this Friday, May 24.

Source: Sony Store UK

    

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AT&T Galaxy Note 2 update rolling out, still 4.1.2

G Note 2

The 69MB update is available over Wifi only, brings new kernel and new radio

Build UCAMC3 looks like it's rolling out heavy for the AT&T branded Galaxy Note 2. Since last night, plenty of users are reporting that they have received the 69MB OTA. There's no official change log posted, but a quick chat with someone who has received it shows that you'll be getting a new radio and a new kernel. Besides the obvious performance boosts to the network that comes with new radio software, users are reporting better and stronger Wifi, and increased performance overall.

You'll need to be on Wifi to download this update, so be sure you're not using your cell radio when you check (right after reading this) lest you get the check again in 24 hours message. When and if AT&T posts any official list of changes, we'll update this post.

Via: Android Central forums. Thanks, Shawn!

 

    

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AT&T Galaxy Note 2 update rolling out, still 4.1.2

G Note 2

The 69MB update is available over Wifi only, brings new kernel and new radio

Build UCAMC3 looks like it's rolling out heavy for the AT&T branded Galaxy Note 2. Since last night, plenty of users are reporting that they have received the 69MB OTA. There's no official change log posted, but a quick chat with someone who has received it shows that you'll be getting a new radio and a new kernel. Besides the obvious performance boosts to the network that comes with new radio software, users are reporting better and stronger Wifi, and increased performance overall.

You'll need to be on Wifi to download this update, so be sure you're not using your cell radio when you check (right after reading this) lest you get the check again in 24 hours message. When and if AT&T posts any official list of changes, we'll update this post.

Via: Android Central forums. Thanks, Shawn!

 

    

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AT&T Galaxy Note 2 update rolling out, still 4.1.2

G Note 2

The 69MB update is available over Wifi only, brings new kernel and new radio

Build UCAMC3 looks like it's rolling out heavy for the AT&T branded Galaxy Note 2. Since last night, plenty of users are reporting that they have received the 69MB OTA. There's no official change log posted, but a quick chat with someone who has received it shows that you'll be getting a new radio and a new kernel. Besides the obvious performance boosts to the network that comes with new radio software, users are reporting better and stronger Wifi, and increased performance overall.

You'll need to be on Wifi to download this update, so be sure you're not using your cell radio when you check (right after reading this) lest you get the check again in 24 hours message. When and if AT&T posts any official list of changes, we'll update this post.

Via: Android Central forums. Thanks, Shawn!

 

    

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PSA: AT&T GALAXY S 4 WiFi tethering bug fixes step-by-step

As the Samsung GALAXY S 4 roll-out continues, it is looking like the users are beginning to find some issues. Some of these will most likely be described as being bigger and more important than others. For example, the locked bootloader will probably not bother all that many users, however the limited amount of available storage on the 16GB GALAXY S 4 probably will. With that in mind, it looks like another GALAXY S 4 bug has recently been discovered.

Screen-Shot-2013-04-23-at-2.59.07-PM1-540x3621

This latest deals with WiFi tethering. Specifically, WiFi tethering for those using an AT&T model GALAXY S 4. The issue is affecting those trying to use the official tethering option found in the ‘wireless and networks’ section of the settings. Basically, even those with tethering enabled are not able to activate and use it. This issue is affecting at least some of the AT&T users and our device happens to be one of the affected. You can get a look from the screenshots below, the phone will make an attempt to verify and then jumps to the ‘mobile hotspot is unavailable’ message.

gs4-bug-03
gs4-bug-01
gs4-bug-02

We’ve since reported the issue to Samsung and they’re looking into it. In the meantime, we have done some testing and do have a workaround solution for those in need of tethering. There is an app called Extended Controls available in the Google Play Store. The app isn’t free, however it is sitting at a low-priced $0.99. Getting tethering setup with the Extended Controls app involves just a few steps, which are detailed below.

  • *Install the app from Play Store
  • *Add the widget “EC Widgets 1×1” to your home screen
  • *Tap the widget to open the settings
  • *Tap “Toggles” at the bottom, then “Add new toggle”
  • *Scroll until you find “Hotspot Wi-Fi”
  • *Tap “Apply.” No need to ‘save this profile.’
  • *Tap the widget to open the hotspot toggle

gs4-wifi-01
gs4-wifi-02
gs4-wifi-03

From here, you can begin using tethering as you want and/or need. For those who may have issues with spending $0.99 to be able to use a feature that should be accessible from your phone, you can take some comfort in knowing the Extended Controls app has plenty of other worthwhile features. Just to start, this app offers customizable widgets with lots of available advanced settings for each of the widgets.

The app has the option to set custom backgrounds and adjust the transparency of the widgets. Some of the available widgets include an AlwaysOn feature, AutoLock, AudioManager, Contact Direct Dial and many more. While we wait for something further from Samsung on this issue, those needing WiFi tethering now can find the Extended Controls app using this Google Play Store link.

Device Specifications and Information
Device Info

    Device Name : Galaxy S 4 (Qualcomm)
    Manufactuer : Samsung
    Carrier : AT&T T-Mobile
    Announced Date : March 14, 2013
    Release Date : April 24, 2013
    Also Known As :

Display

  • Screen Size : 5 Inch
  • Resolution : 1080×1920
  • Screen Type : Super AMOLED
Dimension & Weight

  • Height : 5.37 Inch
  • Width : 2.748 Inch
  • Depth : 0.31 Inch
  • Weight : 130 Grams
Battery & Power
    Battery Type:
  • Lithium Ion
  • Battery Capacity : 2600 mAh
  • Talk Time : NA
  • Stand By Time : NA
Software
    Android OS:
  • 4.2.x
    Audio Playback:
  • AAC
  • AAC+
  • AMR
  • MID
  • MP3
  • WAV
  • WMA
    Video Playback:
  • h.263
  • h.264 / AVC
  • 3GP
  • MPEG-4 (MP4)
  • WMV
    Messaging:
  • SMS
  • MMS
  • IM

Hardware

    CPU : Snapdragon 600 APQ8064T
    CPU Clock Speed : 1900 Mhz
    Core : 4
    Ram : 2000 MB
    Internal Storage : 16 GB
    Front Facing Camera :
    Camera Resolution : 13 MP
    External Storage:
  • MicroSD
  • MicroSDHC
    Camera Features:
  • Auto focus
  • Flash
  • 1080p Video Recording
  • 720p Video Recording
    Sensors:
  • Accelerometer
  • Ambient light
  • Proximity
    QWERTY :
Cellular Network
    Network Technology:
  • GSM
    GSM Band:
  • 850
  • 900
  • 1800
  • 1900
Device Connectivity
    Wi-Fi:
  • 802.11a
  • 802.11b
  • 802.11g
  • 802.11n
  • 802.11ac
    Bluetooth:
  • A2DP
  • Bluetooth 4.0
    Location Features:
  • Compass
  • GPS
  • Cellular location
  • Wi-Fi location
    FM Radio :
    NFC :

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PSA: AT&T GALAXY S 4 WiFi tethering bug fixes step-by-step

As the Samsung GALAXY S 4 roll-out continues, it is looking like the users are beginning to find some issues. Some of these will most likely be described as being bigger and more important than others. For example, the locked bootloader will probably not bother all that many users, however the limited amount of available storage on the 16GB GALAXY S 4 probably will. With that in mind, it looks like another GALAXY S 4 bug has recently been discovered.

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This latest deals with WiFi tethering. Specifically, WiFi tethering for those using an AT&T model GALAXY S 4. The issue is affecting those trying to use the official tethering option found in the ‘wireless and networks’ section of the settings. Basically, even those with tethering enabled are not able to activate and use it. This issue is affecting at least some of the AT&T users and our device happens to be one of the affected. You can get a look from the screenshots below, the phone will make an attempt to verify and then jumps to the ‘mobile hotspot is unavailable’ message.

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We’ve since reported the issue to Samsung and they’re looking into it. In the meantime, we have done some testing and do have a workaround solution for those in need of tethering. There is an app called Extended Controls available in the Google Play Store. The app isn’t free, however it is sitting at a low-priced $0.99. Getting tethering setup with the Extended Controls app involves just a few steps, which are detailed below.

  • *Install the app from Play Store
  • *Add the widget “EC Widgets 1×1” to your home screen
  • *Tap the widget to open the settings
  • *Tap “Toggles” at the bottom, then “Add new toggle”
  • *Scroll until you find “Hotspot Wi-Fi”
  • *Tap “Apply.” No need to ‘save this profile.’
  • *Tap the widget to open the hotspot toggle

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From here, you can begin using tethering as you want and/or need. For those who may have issues with spending $0.99 to be able to use a feature that should be accessible from your phone, you can take some comfort in knowing the Extended Controls app has plenty of other worthwhile features. Just to start, this app offers customizable widgets with lots of available advanced settings for each of the widgets.

The app has the option to set custom backgrounds and adjust the transparency of the widgets. Some of the available widgets include an AlwaysOn feature, AutoLock, AudioManager, Contact Direct Dial and many more. While we wait for something further from Samsung on this issue, those needing WiFi tethering now can find the Extended Controls app using this Google Play Store link.

Device Specifications and Information
Device Info

    Device Name : Galaxy S 4 (Qualcomm)
    Manufactuer : Samsung
    Carrier : AT&T T-Mobile
    Announced Date : March 14, 2013
    Release Date : April 24, 2013
    Also Known As :

Display

  • Screen Size : 5 Inch
  • Resolution : 1080×1920
  • Screen Type : Super AMOLED
Dimension & Weight

  • Height : 5.37 Inch
  • Width : 2.748 Inch
  • Depth : 0.31 Inch
  • Weight : 130 Grams
Battery & Power
    Battery Type:
  • Lithium Ion
  • Battery Capacity : 2600 mAh
  • Talk Time : NA
  • Stand By Time : NA
Software
    Android OS:
  • 4.2.x
    Audio Playback:
  • AAC
  • AAC+
  • AMR
  • MID
  • MP3
  • WAV
  • WMA
    Video Playback:
  • h.263
  • h.264 / AVC
  • 3GP
  • MPEG-4 (MP4)
  • WMV
    Messaging:
  • SMS
  • MMS
  • IM

Hardware

    CPU : Snapdragon 600 APQ8064T
    CPU Clock Speed : 1900 Mhz
    Core : 4
    Ram : 2000 MB
    Internal Storage : 16 GB
    Front Facing Camera :
    Camera Resolution : 13 MP
    External Storage:
  • MicroSD
  • MicroSDHC
    Camera Features:
  • Auto focus
  • Flash
  • 1080p Video Recording
  • 720p Video Recording
    Sensors:
  • Accelerometer
  • Ambient light
  • Proximity
    QWERTY :
Cellular Network
    Network Technology:
  • GSM
    GSM Band:
  • 850
  • 900
  • 1800
  • 1900
Device Connectivity
    Wi-Fi:
  • 802.11a
  • 802.11b
  • 802.11g
  • 802.11n
  • 802.11ac
    Bluetooth:
  • A2DP
  • Bluetooth 4.0
    Location Features:
  • Compass
  • GPS
  • Cellular location
  • Wi-Fi location
    FM Radio :
    NFC :

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Samsung Wi-Fi Only Camera to Sell at $450 This Month

Earlier today I was reading about Panasonic’s new Lumix DMC-GF6 camera which will come with WiFi capabilities and I was thinking just how impressive cameras are becoming today.  The Panasonic camera will boast of a 16MP sensor, an improved AF, a fast processor and an impressive screen.  Just after reading it, by chance, I read about how Samsung has introduced a version of its Samsung Galaxy camera that runs on Android – but this time instead of 3G and 4G, it has WiFi.

Samsung Galaxy Camera WiFi

Samsung launched this revolutionary camera that runs on Android mid-last year and despite the hype it received and the effort the company put to make sure that the product they released to the market was one of a kind, it didn’t actually pick up as expected, maybe because the camera is exclusively available on AT&T, but it did well nevertheless.  The new version of the camera had been tipped to come last year but Samsung had not made any commitments on when it would be on the shelves.

According to Samsung, the camera comes with all the features and specs of the one launched last year except of course the difference in connectivity options at a price of $450.  If you have not been on the loop, here are its core specs:

Processor: quad-core 1.4GHz processor

Operating System: Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean)

Video Capture: MPEG4, AVC/H.264 MP4 Full HD 1920×1080 at 30fps; 768×512 Slow motion Movie at 120fps

Audio: AAC

Image: JPEG format  16M, 14M, 12M Wide, 10M, 5M, 3M, 2M Wide, 1M

Lens: 21x Optical Zoom Lens, 23 mm Wide Angle, F2.8 (W) ~ 5.9(T)

Display: 121.2 mm (4.8″), 308 ppi, HD Super Clear Touch Display

Memory: 8GB onboard with memory card slot

Image Sensor: 16.3 effective megapixel 1/2.3″ BSI CMOS

GPS: GPS, GLONASS

IS: OIS

ISO: Auto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200

Connectivity: WiFi a/b/g/n, WiFi HT40; GPS, GLONASS; Bluetooth 4.0

Battery: 1,650 mAh

Build: 128.7 x 70.8 x 19.1 mm, 300g

The best thing about this camera is that there will be no commitments to make with a network carrier, and will work pretty well uploading images to the cloud and to social networks through WiFi.  It is also $50 cheaper compared to the AT&T version and can work just as well as an android smartphone – without the GSM features of course.

Will you consider getting the WiFi camera for $450?  Let us know what you think?

 

Sources: Ubergizmo and Engadget

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